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[CORRECTION] Frost & Sullivan: Detection of More than 800 Guns at Checkpoints during 2011 Shows Importance of Airport Screening Technologies

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[CORRECTION] Frost & Sullivan: Detection of More than 800 Guns at Checkpoints during 2011 Shows Importance of Airport Screening Technologies PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 14, 2012 - Rising health concerns compel market participants to publish scientific evidence regarding the safety of their systems - UPDATE: On a press release issued on June 12, 2012, Frost & Sullivan had a headline stating: "Frost & Sullivan: Detection of More than 800 Guns within Planes during 2011 Shows Importance of Airport Screening Technologies," which was an incorrect statement. The headline above reflects our true findings. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused. MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The transportation security agency (TSA) is responsible for preventing knives, guns and other weapons from being taken aboard airplanes. Despite their precautions, more than 800 guns were detected at checkpoints prior to making it on board planes during 2011. This scenario has highlighted the need for more stringent screening methods. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.aerospace.frost.com), U.S. Airport Screening Technologies Market, finds that during 2011 TSA distributed approximately $437.1 million in contract obligations toward airport screening technologies. If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at jeannette.garcia@frost.
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[CORRECTION] Frost & Sullivan: Detection of
More than 800 Guns at Checkpoints during
2011 Shows Importance of Airport Screening
Technologies
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 14, 2012
- Rising health concerns compel market participants to publish
scientific evidence regarding the safety of their systems
- UPDATE: On a press release issued on June 12, 2012, Frost & Sullivan had a
headline stating: "Frost & Sullivan: Detection of More than 800 Guns within
Planes during 2011 Shows Importance of Airport Screening Technologies,"
which was an incorrect statement. The headline above reflects our true
findings. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused.
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
June 14, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- The transportation
security agency (TSA) is responsible for preventing knives, guns and other
weapons from being taken aboard airplanes. Despite their precautions, more
than 800 guns were detected at checkpoints prior to making it on board planes
during 2011. This scenario has highlighted the need for more stringent
screening methods.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.aerospace.frost.com),
U.S.
Airport Screening Technologies Market
, finds that during 2011 TSA
distributed approximately
$437.1 million
in contract obligations toward airport
screening technologies.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at
jeannette.garcia@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title,
telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and
country.
Currently, explosives detection systems are the main technology for airport
screening processes, but the future demand will call for systems that are
smaller, versatile and can enhance throughput speed. The 9/11 attacks are a
grim reminder of how failed layers of security have lethal consequences.
Authorities are constantly looking to plug gaps in the system effectively and
efficiently.
"Significant revenue growth in airport screening technology will depend on
innovations in systems for the mass screening of personnel," said Frost &
Sullivan Industry Analyst John Hernandez. "A technology that can screen large
groups subtly to categorize and separate them based on risk will revive interest
and open up the market."
Private security companies soon could be handling passenger screening at U.S.
airports. This is due to recently passed legislation cleared by both the House of
Representatives and the Senate.
As terrorism becomes more adaptive, there is an urgent need to replace and
repair the existing security systems. The effectiveness of advanced imaging
technology (AIT) devices in detecting concealed weapons is still under review.