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Frost & Sullivan: Europe Lagging Behind Regarding Standard ESC Fitment in Cars

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Frost & Sullivan: Europe Lagging BehindFrost & Sullivan: Europe Lagging Behind Regarding Standard ESC Fitment in Cars PR Newswire LONDON, Feb. 18, 2014 -- Responsibility lies with dealers as well as OEMs to ensure technology uptake, which provides a solution to reach a zero- fatalities target in road traffic Electronic Stability Control (ESC) is the most dominant enabler for active and passive safety technologies. Built into a car, it is crucial to avoiding crashes caused by losing control over the vehicle. But while the technology has achieved near complete penetration in North America, Europe still lags behind, which is mainly due to the lack of legislations mandating the technology in the region. Despite the European New Car Assessment Programme (EuroNCAP) which includes tests to rate cars fitted with ESC from 2011, the technology has witnessed only minimal growth over the last two years. According to Frost & Sullivan, the European ESC market is expected to reach a market value of close to €2 billion by 2020. Among the various original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), it is the upper tiers in the pyramid that attract maximum fitment rates, with the German Big Three claiming close to 100 percent fitment across the eight segments they cater to. "The mass market segments, though, work differently," says Frost & Sullivan (www.automotive.frost.com) Industry Analyst, Arunprasad Nandakumar.
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Frost & Sullivan: Europe Lagging Behind Regarding Standard ESC Fitment in Cars

PR Newswire

-- Responsibility lies with dealers as well as OEMs to ensure technology uptake, which provides a solution to reach a zero-fatalities target in road traffic

Electronic Stability Control (ESC) is the most dominant enabler for active and passive safety technologies. Built into a car, it is crucial to avoiding crashes caused by losing control over the vehicle. But while the technology has achieved near complete penetration in North America, Europe still lags behind, which is mainly due to the lack of legislations mandating the technology in the region. Despite the European New Car Assessment Programme (EuroNCAP) which includes tests to rate cars fitted with ESC from 2011, the technology has witnessed only minimal growth over the last two years.