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Frost & Sullivan: U.S. DoD Spending on C4ISR Loses Steam as General-purpose Equipment Gains Traction

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Frost & Sullivan: U.S. DoD Spending on C4ISR Loses Steam as General-purpose Equipment Gains Traction PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 12, 2012 - DoD spending trends point to a growth in demand for inexpensive, tried and tested platforms MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Straitened economic circumstances and troop withdrawals are expected to reduce command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) funding, restricting the Department of Defense's (DoD's) spending to applications that have direct relevance to counter- insurgency or terror operations. Planned force structure reductions, particularly for ground forces and satellite assets, will curtail C4ISR spending and instead, turn the DoD's attention to intelligence and special operations. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.defense.frost.com), DoD C4ISR, finds that the 2013 U.S. DoD C4ISR budget request is $42.97 billion and will decline at a moderate rate through 2017. C4ISR spending is about 6.9 percent of the total DoD budget. If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at jeannette.garcia@frost.com, with your full name, company name, title, telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and country.
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Frost & Sullivan: U.S. DoD Spending on C4ISR
Loses Steam as General-purpose Equipment
Gains Traction
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 12, 2012
- DoD spending trends point to a growth in demand for inexpensive,
tried and tested platforms
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
July 12, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Straitened economic
circumstances and troop withdrawals are expected to reduce command,
control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and
reconnaissance (C4ISR) funding, restricting the Department of Defense's
(DoD's) spending to applications that have direct relevance to counter-
insurgency or terror operations. Planned force structure reductions, particularly
for ground forces and satellite assets, will curtail C4ISR spending and instead,
turn the DoD's attention to intelligence and special operations.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.defense.frost.com),
DoD C4ISR
,
finds that the 2013 U.S. DoD C4ISR budget request is
$42.97 billion
and will
decline at a moderate rate through 2017. C4ISR spending is about 6.9 percent
of the total DoD budget.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at
jeannette.garcia@frost.com, with your full name, company name, title,
telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and
country.
"While research, development, test & evaluation (RDT&E) spending will reduce,
the following: repair, maintenance, training, information assurance, and
operational services will continue to be funding priorities," said Frost & Sullivan
Senior Industry Analyst Brad Curran. "The DoD budget will be mostly
earmarked for acquiring cost-efficient, general-purpose equipment."
There will be fewer platforms of all types, as the DoD will eschew high-end
platforms in favor of proven and reliable designs that afford maximum
flexibility.
Most of the available C4ISR equipment has reached the end of its serviceable
life and is awaiting upgrades. The DoD is looking to spruce up neglected
'conventional' capabilities as missile defense and electronic warfare require
substantial investments to keep pace with the advances made by potential
adversaries. Electronic warfare and information operation activities will
experience the fastest growth rate till 2017.
The DoD is perceptibly leaning toward multi-purpose technologies that fuse
various collection disciplines and standardize reporting. Processing and
dissemination of full-motion video will also continue to be an area of robust
growth.
There has been a surge in the adoption of practical, rapid, inexpensive
platforms such as aerostats and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tools like
wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi). C4ISR services such as language and cultural skills,
maintenance, engineering, integration, training, project management –