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Frost & Sullivan: Wider Deployment of Cloud Computing Makes a Case for UPS Installation in the Asia Pacific

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Frost & Sullivan: Wider Deployment of Cloud Computing Makes a Case for UPS Installation in the Asia Pacific PR Newswire KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012 - Better Trained Manpower Crucial to Convince Reluctant End Users to Adopt UPS Based on New Technologies KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Several projects that were deferred during the economic downturn are now getting off the ground, generating demand for UPS systems. The market is expected to recover fully by 2015, mainly due to governments' emphasis on cloud computing, green technology and smart grids. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.powersupplies.frost.com), Asia- Pacific Uninterruptible Power Supplies Market, finds that the market earned revenues of US$1.46 billion in 2011 and estimates this to reach US$2.03 billion in 2017. Data centres' popularity has raised the profile of cloud computing in Southeast Asia, Australia and Japan. Following this development, governments have been eager to adopt cloud computing to accelerate economic development, which, in turn, has accelerated the uptake of UPS systems. "Several public and private companies are included in governments' programmes to convert all government agencies' computing systems to a public cloud system, creating a cast market for UPS devices," says Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Avanthika Satheesh.
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Frost & Sullivan: Wider Deployment of Cloud
Computing Makes a Case for UPS Installation
in the Asia Pacific
PR Newswire
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012
-
Better Trained Manpower Crucial to Convince Reluctant End Users to
Adopt UPS Based on New Technologies
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
,
June 14, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Several projects that
were deferred during the economic downturn are now getting off the ground,
generating demand for UPS systems. The market is expected to recover fully
by 2015, mainly due to governments' emphasis on cloud computing, green
technology and smart grids.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.powersupplies.frost.com),
Asia-
Pacific Uninterruptible Power Supplies Market
, finds that the market
earned revenues of
US$1.46 billion
in 2011 and estimates this to reach
US$2.03
billion
in 2017.
Data centres' popularity has raised the profile of cloud computing in
Southeast
Asia
,
Australia
and
Japan
. Following this development, governments have been
eager to adopt cloud computing to accelerate economic development, which,
in turn, has accelerated the uptake of UPS systems.
"Several public and private companies are included in governments'
programmes to convert all government agencies' computing systems to a
public cloud system, creating a cast market for UPS devices," says Frost &
Sullivan Research Analyst Avanthika Satheesh.
With the existing power network becoming unreliable and the Fukushima
earthquake causing power disruptions in
Japan
, the sales of single phase UPS
soared. End users will also look to adopt UPS systems once companies provide
better product services. Participants can gain a competitive advantage by
offering a combination of a warranty on efficiency, aftersales service, 24/7
customer service and spare parts.
The mining, manufacturing and power utility industries will be the biggest
contributors to market revenues. The introduction of smart grids all over the
region is also creating considerable opportunities for the UPS market, as these
grids require constant monitoring, intelligent control and communication.
However, end users in the mining and power utility sectors tend to be reluctant
to adopt new technologies such green technology due to fears that the
unproven technology could halt their production or cause accidents. Therefore,
UPS products supplied to these sectors have to meet customized technical
specifications.
"Customers' expectations could challenge UPS manufacturers since they
generally lack expertise and industry knowledge in the mining, chemical, power
and manufacturing sectors," notes Satheesh. "Manufacturers will be better
equipped to meet end-user demand by participating in frequent development
programs and training so they have skilled manpower."
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