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Improved Energy Harvesting Technologies Boost Efficiency in Buildings, Finds Frost & Sullivan

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Improved Energy Harvesting Technologies Boost Efficiency in Buildings, Finds Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 10, 2012 - Mass adoption is delayed as more R&D is needed to establish a total solution MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Heating, cooling and lighting are the main energy expenditures in buildings today. A building automation system (BAS), which is powered by batteries, can assist in reducing and optimizing these energy expenses, while maintaining a comfortable environment for occupants. The key in making a BAS function in terms of relaying data related to temperature, occupancy, wind flow, light intensity, and so on, are wireless sensor networks (WSNs). A drawback for WSNs is the dependence on batteries, which have severe limitations with respect to life span and maintenance, among other shortfalls. Energy harvesters (EHs) significantly improve battery life, thereby reducing maintenance and disposal costs. Analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com) Advances in Energy Harvesting Technologies for Building Automation research finds that progression in EH technology has enabled BASs to be more independent and flexible to identify and address energy wastage from buildings. This is provided through EHs' ability to scavenge ambient energy, including solar power as well as thermal, kinetic and electrical energy, allowing EHs to resupply power regularly.
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Improved Energy Harvesting Technologies
Boost Efficiency in Buildings, Finds Frost &
Sullivan
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, July 10, 2012
- Mass adoption is delayed as more R&D is needed to establish a total
solution
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
July 10, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Heating, cooling and
lighting are the main energy expenditures in buildings today. A building
automation system (BAS), which is powered by batteries, can assist in reducing
and optimizing these energy expenses, while maintaining a comfortable
environment for occupants. The key in making a BAS function in terms of
relaying data related to temperature, occupancy, wind flow, light intensity, and
so on, are wireless sensor networks (WSNs). A drawback for WSNs is the
dependence on batteries, which have severe limitations with respect to life
span and maintenance, among other shortfalls. Energy harvesters (EHs)
significantly improve battery life, thereby reducing maintenance and disposal
costs.
Analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com)
Advances in Energy Harvesting Technologies for Building Automation
research finds that progression in EH technology has enabled BASs to be more
independent and flexible to identify and address energy wastage from
buildings. This is provided through EHs' ability to scavenge ambient energy,
including solar power as well as thermal, kinetic and electrical energy, allowing
EHs to resupply power regularly. From this enhanced energy reservoir, WSNs
are enabled to have additional features and options for end-users. Additionally,
the energy efficiency of EHs allow WSNs to be placed anywhere in a building,
with minimal overhead. This eco-friendly technology aligns well with popular
green initiatives currently being implemented.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Britni Myers, Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com,
with your full name, company name, title, telephone number, company email
address, company Web site, city, state and country.
Universities are at the forefront of exploring techniques and designs to reduce
the EH footprint and increase the power density factor. Original equipment
manufacturer (OEM) initiatives have also caused a huge impact in bringing
together market actors to deploy products with interoperability and ease of
implementation for the end-user. Alliances have played a vital role in
collaborating and bringing together the different manufacturers under one
umbrella; however, more collaboration is needed at the university level.
"Reducing the energy consumption of EHs has not affected the performance of
the device," said Technical Insights Industry Analyst Saju John Mathew. "Rather,
the unique microstructuring design and dense packing has increased the power
density several fold. This enables the EH to be physically integrated with
different custom designed WSN applications."