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Increasing Minimal Invasive Surgeries to Boost Adoption of Hybrid Operating Rooms in Europe, Says Frost & Sullivan

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Increasing Minimal Invasive Surgeries to Boost Adoption of Hybrid Operating Rooms in Europe, Says Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire LONDON, Aug. 8, 2012 - Procedure demand expected to swell given the growing number of patients with complex cardiovascular and neurological diseases LONDON, Aug. 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The next five years will see many hospitals in Europe overcoming the high cost and complexity of implementation in hybrid operating rooms (OR) by adopting better planning and budget allocation, thereby encouraging hospitals with larger cardiac and neurosurgery services to implement at least one hybrid OR. Hybrid OR combines conventional surgical equipment with state-of-the-art endovascular imaging equipment to facilitate a multitude of new surgical events for practically all medical disciplines. Currently, Europe has very few hybrid OR in comparison to mature markets such as North America. This is set to change as hybrid OR facilitate sophisticated surgeries while reducing hospitalization periods. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.patientmonitoring.frost.com), Operating Rooms of the Future: A European Perspective, finds that the crisscrossing of disciplines to cure the complex diseases of this age - coupled with the booming demand for minimal invasive surgeries, which are complex with high technology demands over traditional open surgical approaches - will boost adoption of hybrid OR, also known as the Operating Room of the Future.
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Increasing Minimal Invasive Surgeries to Boost Adoption of Hybrid Operating Rooms in Europe, Says Frost & Sullivan
PR Newswire LONDON, Aug. 8, 2012
- Procedure demand expected to swell given the growing number of patients with complex cardiovascular and neurological diseases LONDON, Aug. 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The next five years will see many hospitals inEuropeovercoming the high cost and complexity of implementation in hybrid operating rooms (OR) by adopting better planning and budget allocation, thereby encouraging hospitals with larger cardiac and neurosurgery services to implement at least one hybrid OR. Hybrid OR combines conventional surgical equipment with state-of-the-art endovascular imaging equipment to facilitate a multitude of new surgical events for practically all medical disciplines. Currently,Europehas very few hybrid OR in comparison to mature markets such asNorth America. This is set to change as hybrid OR facilitate sophisticated surgeries while reducing hospitalization periods. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.patientmonitoring.frost.com), Operating Rooms of the Future: A European Perspective, finds that the crisscrossing of disciplines to cure the complex diseases of this age - coupled with the booming demand for minimal invasive surgeries, which are complex with high technology demands over traditional open surgical approaches - will boost adoption of hybrid OR, also known as the Operating Room of the Future. The key restraint to the uptake of hybrid OR is cost. The expense involved in setting up a hybrid suite can vary between$3 million to $9 million, including the heavy investment in large devices like MRI or CT. InEurope, installation costs alone start at$4 millionfor an empty site. "Hybrid OR is perceived as an expensive alternative to traditional operating rooms, mainly due to the high initial investment," says Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Somsainathan CK. "Currently, European countries are struggling to overcome the economic crisis and such investments are not seen as attractive or critical areas that demand immediate budgets. Due to lack of funds, hybrid OR is witnessing a lower adoption rate than its actual potential." However, most operating theatres are running at an average of 68% of their capacity even though it is the largest revenue and cost-generating centre for a hospital – accounting for approximately 42% of the average healthcare organisation's revenue and a proportionate share of its costs. A hybrid OR will allow both human and technical resources to be employed optimally. Thus, integration of a hybrid OR into the central surgical department generates the most advantages, since a hybrid OR allows interdisciplinary applications and is available as an operating room resource. "Practically, once the hybrid is set up, the hospital can save costs through its use and additionally optimise the selection and quality of treatment routines. This also increases patient and staff satisfaction," concluded Somsainathan. "Educating and increasing the awareness about the benefits of hybrid OR, as