//img.uscri.be/pth/bed3520fd300500551996aa87e07c71f3caa25c8
Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

Industrial Wireless Devices will Support Building Plants of the Future, Says Frost & Sullivan

2 pages
Industrial Wireless Devices will Support Building Plants of the Future, Says Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire LONDON, Oct. 17, 2012 - Demand for operational mobility and flexibility drive industrial wireless devices adoption LONDON, Oct. 17, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Since its initial introduction on the plant floor, wireless technology has evolved and so has the perception of industrial wireless among end users. Wireless devices are no longer seen solely in terms of wire replacement but, more importantly, as a critical part of plant optimisation processes. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.industrialautomation.frost.com), Analysis of Wireless Devices in European Industrial Automation Market, finds that the market earned revenues of $218.0 million in 2011 and estimates this to reach $539.5 million in 2016. "Wireless devices reduce maintenance costs, boost productivity and improve quality of production," notes Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Anna Mazurek. "At the same time, initial implementation does not require vast restructuring or expensive machinery replacement. This combination of plant optimisation, quick return on investment and easy installation is highlighting the benefits of industrial wireless automation." Industrial wireless devices optimise the working of plant equipment through better asset allocation and monitoring machine health. They support plant staff with constant data access and easy communication.
Voir plus Voir moins
Industrial Wireless Devices will Support Building Plants of the Future, Says Frost & Sullivan
PR Newswire LONDON, Oct. 17, 2012
- Demand for operational mobility and flexibility drive industrial wireless devices adoption
LONDON, Oct. 17, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Since its initial introduction on the plant floor, wireless technology has evolved and so has the perception of industrial wireless among end users. Wireless devices are no longer seen solely in terms of wire replacement but, more importantly, as a critical part of plant optimisation processes.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.industrialautomation.frost.com),Analysis of Wireless Devices in European Industrial Automation Market, finds that the market earned revenues of$218.0 millionin 2011 and estimates this to reach$539.5 millionin 2016.
"Wireless devices reduce maintenance costs, boost productivity and improve quality of production," notes Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Anna Mazurek. "At the sam e time, initial implementation does not require vast restructuring or expensive machinery replacement. This combination of plant optimisation, quick return on investment and easy installation is highlighting the benefits of industrial wireless automation."
Industrial wireless devices optimise the working of plant equipment through better asset allocation and monitoring machine health. They support plant staff with constant data access and easy communication. Constant and instant access to real-time data also supports enhanced operational flexibility and mobility.
However, the perception of wireless devices as a non-critical improvement threatens to limit penetration levels. The technology provides end users with connections that are often already covered by wires and likely to last another decade. Moreover, plant managers do not yet perceive wireless technology as the harbinger of significant production process improvements.
"End users need to realise that wireless technology not only replaces wires but has the potential to reshape and optimise production process," remarks Mazurek. "Vendor efforts to promote the technology have fallen short, particularly among the more reluctant potential wireless adopters."
Wireless devices manufacturers need to educate end users not only about basic technological features, but also on the full range of usage benefits and opportunities offered by wireless communication.
"Most importantly, end users will need to be educated on how the technology can be tailored to address their particular needs," advises Mazurek. "The market needs another 4-5 years of pilot applications and technology trials to address all pending concerns about the technology performance and convince end users on the advantages of deploying industrial wireless devices."
If you are interested in more information on this study, please send an email with your contact details toAnna Zanchi, Corporate Communications, atanna.zanchi@frost.com.
Analysis of Wireless Devices in European Industrial Automation Marketis part of theIndustrial Automation & Process ControlGrowth Partnership Services program, which also includes research in the following markets: short-range devices, medium-range devices and long-range wireless devices. All research services included in subscriptions provide detailed market opportunities and industry trends that have been evaluated following extensive interviews with market participants.
About Frost & Sullivan Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, w orks in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants.
Our "Growth Partnership" supports clients by addressing these opportunities and incorporating two key elements driving visionary innovation: The Integrated Value Proposition and The Partnership Infrastructure.
The Integrated Value Propositionprovides support to our clients throughout all phases of their journey to visionary innovation including: research, analysis, strategy, vision, innovation and implementation. The Partnership Infrastructureis entirely unique as it constructs the foundation upon which visionary innovation becomes possible. This includes our 360 degree research, comprehensive industry coverage, career best practices as well as our global footprint of m ore than 40 offices.
For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organisation prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices,