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Need for Energy Security Powers up Substation Integration and Automation in the Asia Pacific, Finds Frost & Sullivan

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Need for Energy Security Powers up Substation Integration and Automation in the Asia Pacific, Finds Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012 - Aging Substations Create Significant Opportunities for Replacement Sales and Retrofits KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The recent nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima has highlighted the need for energy security in the Asia Pacific. Governments are looking at alternative sources of energy to meet the escalating demand for electricity in the region. Malaysia and Vietnam are targeting a renewable energy contribution of nearly 11 percent and 6 percent respectively to the energy mix by 2015, which will directly stimulate the demand for substation integration and automation. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.energy.frost.com), Asia-Pacific Substation Integration and Automation Market, finds that the market earned revenues of US$308.3 million in 2010 and estimates this to reach US$376.0 million in 2015. It is not possible to connect diverse sources of renewable energy without having better visibility and control of the network. The high volatility in power generated from renewable energy sources makes it necessary for utilities to fully automate their grids to achieve higher operational efficiency and reduce the system average interruption duration index.
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Need for Energy Security Powers up
Substation Integration and Automation in the
Asia Pacific, Finds Frost & Sullivan
PR Newswire
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, June 14, 2012
- Aging Substations Create Significant Opportunities for Replacement
Sales and Retrofits
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
,
June 14, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- The recent nuclear
power plant accident in Fukushima has highlighted the need for energy security
in the
Asia Pacific
. Governments are looking at alternative sources of energy to
meet the escalating demand for electricity in the region.
Malaysia
and
Vietnam
are targeting a renewable energy contribution of nearly 11 percent and 6
percent respectively to the energy mix by 2015, which will directly stimulate the
demand for substation integration and automation.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.energy.frost.com),
Asia-Pacific
Substation Integration and Automation Market
, finds that the market
earned revenues of
US$308.3 million
in 2010 and estimates this to reach
US$376.0 million
in 2015.
It is not possible to connect diverse sources of renewable energy without
having better visibility and control of the network. The high volatility in power
generated from renewable energy sources makes it necessary for utilities to
fully automate their grids to achieve higher operational efficiency and reduce
the system average interruption duration index.
While the integration of renewable energy sources into a fully automated grid is
expected to stoke the need for new transmission and distribution substations,
the rising demand for higher electricity generation capacity is intensifying the
need for superior electrical infrastructure.
"There is also a significant need to improve existing power infrastructure,
particularly in
Southeast Asia
, as most of the substations are not fully
automated," says Frost & Sullivan Consulting Analyst Jieqiang Tan.
While utilities are eager to incorporate fully automated systems in the
transmission and distribution substations so they can monitor and identify the
location of faults, industrial customers are cost conscious and more
circumspect about their investments. However, they are likely to increase their
spending with greater awareness of the long-term benefits of automated
substations.
The market is characterized by large multinational companies, which provide
an extensive range of products and turnkey solutions, especially for the retrofit
market.
"However, the volatile market projects an unclear picture of ROI and in some
cases, retrofitting aging substations is not economically viable," notes Tan. "The
degree of automation varies from project to project and depends on the age of
the infrastructure, the demographics, and the condition of existing automation
infrastructure."
The replacement market is also abuzz with activity, as the substation