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Unmanned Ground Systems: Semi-Autonomy is the Way Forward over the Next Ten Years, says Frost & Sullivan

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Unmanned Ground Systems: Semi-Unmanned Ground Systems: Semi- Autonomy is the Way Forward over the Next Ten Years, says Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire LONDON, Dec. 2, 2013 -- Military vehicle manufactures may be reluctant to invest heavily in unmanned systems research and development due to a largely undefined need Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) represent a tiny proportion of vehicle inventories globally but replacing and complementing manned vehicles with unmanned systems is a powerful opportunity. As yet, it has not been defined how the technology will be best utilised or how new systems will be integrated into force structures. According to Frost & Sullivan in the five-to-ten-year timeframe there will be only a limited proliferation of unmanned technology into the market. "Currently, the US is at the forefront in terms of integration and acquisition of unmanned systems into its military land vehicle fleet," said Programme Manager, Aerospace, Defence & Security, Richard Hilton. "But even the US has dramatically scaled back its intent to integrate unmanned systems in line with wider cut backs and defence sequestration. Moreover, there are no really significant procurement programmes for UGVs in any other region." The commercial automotive industry is leading the way in unmanned vehicle systems.
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Unmanned Ground Systems: Semi-Autonomy is the Way Forward over the Next Ten Years, says Frost & Sullivan

PR Newswire

-- Military vehicle manufactures may be reluctant to invest heavily in unmanned systems research and development due to a largely undefined need

Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) represent a tiny proportion of vehicle inventories globally but replacing and complementing manned vehicles with unmanned systems is a powerful opportunity. As yet, it has not been defined how the technology will be best utilised or how new systems will be integrated into force structures. According to Frost & Sullivan in the five-to-ten-year timeframe there will be only a limited proliferation of unmanned technology into the market.