Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

Report of the Expert Group on Customer Mobility in relation to ...

De
49 pages

Report of the Expert Group on Customer Mobility in relation to ...

Publié par :
Ajouté le : 21 juillet 2011
Lecture(s) : 105
Signaler un abus
EUROPEAN COMMISSION Internal Market and Services DG  FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Retail issues, consumer policy and payment systems   Brussels,5 June 2007  
EXPERTGROUP ONCUSTOMERMOBILITYIN RELATION TOBANKACCOUNTSREPORT
      
DISCLAIMERThe views expressed in this report are the views of the Expert Group and its members, and not of the European Commission.  Commission européenne, B-1049 Bruxelles / Europese Commissie, B-1049 Brussel - Belgium. Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11. Office: SPA2 4/4. Telephone: direct line (32-2) 295 34 60. Fax: (32-2) 295 07 50.  http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/ E-mail: jurga.stanciute@ec.europa.eu
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FOREWORD BY THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION ...................................................... 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................. 4 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................... 10 2. GENERAL................................................................................................................11 2.1. Scope ...........................................................................................................11 2.2. Three scenarios ............................................................................................... 11 2.3. Future developments of the payments market ................................................ 11 2.4. Switching versus multi-banking ..................................................................... 13 2.5. Consumer behaviour ....................................................................................... 14 2.6. Bank strategies ................................................................................................ 18 3. DISCUSSIONS OF BARRIERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ........................... 19 3.1. Switching ........................................................................................................ 19 3.1.1. Information asymmetry and untransparency of prices...................... 19 3.1.2. Bundling and tying............................................................................ 26 3.1.3. Administrative burden....................................................................... 27 3.1.4. Closing charges ................................................................................. 33 3.2. Cross-border opening...................................................................................... 34 3.2.1. Legal and regulatory barriers ............................................................ 35 3.2.2. Information barriers and uncertainty ................................................ 35 3.2.3. Commercial decisions by banks........................................................ 38 3.2.4. Opening and closing charges ............................................................ 39 ANNEX 1: LIST OF EXPERT GROUP MEMBERS ...................................................... 40 ANNEX 2: EXAMPLES OF NATIONAL MEASURES TO IMPROVE .......................... INFORMATION, PRICE TRANSPARENCY AND COMPARABILITY ............. 41 ANNEX 3: SUMMARY OF NATIONAL SWITCHING ARRANGEMENTS .............. 43  
 
2
FOREWORD BY THEEUROPEANCOMMISSIONThe Commission considers that customer mobility is a key factor to boost competition in retail financial services markets. This is confirmed by the findings of the Commission sector inquiry into retail banking. According to the report on retail banking sector inquiry1, customer mobility and choice exert competitive pressure on existing and potential suppliers to continually improve their performance and thus should be seen as an important contributor to competitive retail banking markets. Furthermore, obstacles to mobility can function as entry barriers. In May 2006, the Commission set up the Expert Group on Customer Mobility in relation to Bank Accounts (the Group) in order to identify existing obstacles to customer mobility in relation to bank accounts and provide recommendations to the Commission on how the obstacles identified should be addressed.2 a list  Experts,of whom can be found in Annex 1, were selected in a personal capacity and do not necessarily represent the views of their respective organisations. The Group was requested to produce a final report containing its findings and recommendations. The Commission considers the Group's report as a very important contribution in the preparation of its own policy decisions in the area of customer mobility in relation to bank accounts. It is, however, important to note that the Group was not asked to measure the impact of its recommendations. In line with better regulation principles and as a follow-up to the Group's work, the Commission will hold a public consultation on the Group's report and will assess the impact of the Group's recommendations. The Commission will then evaluate what actions should be taken to improve customer mobility in relation to bank accounts.
                                                 1 Commission Staff Working Document, SEC(2007) 106, 31 January 2007. Available at: http://ec.europa.eu/comm/competition/antitrust/others/sector_inquiries/financial_services/sec_2007_106.pdf. 22006 (OJ L 132, p. 37 Decision 2006/355/EC of 16 May  Commission).  3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INTRODUCTIONThe Expert Group on Customer Mobility in relation to Bank Accounts (the Group) was asked to cover three scenarios of customer mobility: national switching (switching from one bank to another within the same Member State); cross-border switching (switching from a bank in one Member State to a bank in another Member State); and cross-border opening (opening of a bank account in another Member State, with or without physical presence). The Group members' views diverged on most issues. While consumer experts consider customer mobility in relation to bank accounts as a problem, banking industry experts do not consider that it represents an actual problem. Both groups of experts base their view on a number of available reports, studies and surveys. This final report of the Group summarises its discussions and presents the recommendations of the experts participating in the Group. Where possible, the report reflects unanimous views and, where necessary, the various positions expressed. The recommendations have been made on the basis that appropriate impact assessments are completed before any implementation of the recommendations can be considered. The scope of the report is customer mobility in relation to current accounts, including payment facilities attached to the latter (credit transfers, direct debits and cash withdrawal), and simple savings accounts (excluding savings such as securities accounts or life insurance) in as much as obstacles and solutions are the same or similar as for current accounts. It covers retail customers (individuals and micro and small enterprises).
GENERALThis section covers a number of issues that the Group, or parts of it, considered relevant to the discussion on customer mobility. a) Future developments in payments market The Group considers that the Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on payment services in the internal market (the Payment Services Directive – PSD) and its interplay with the implementation of the Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA) will have an impact on the issue of customer mobility in relation to payment accounts, since they both define the future market for payment services. However, views differ on what kind of impact this will be, and how it will affect various scenarios of customer mobility. Consumer experts consider that there is still a large degree of uncertainty as regards the implementation of the PSD and the launch of SEPA products. Banking industry experts disagree with consumer experts and argue that the PSD will remove some obstacles to customer mobility, such as closing fees, while SEPA, according to them and some academics, will decrease the need for consumers to open a bank account in another Member State but also will give consumers an opportunity to shop around and open a bank account in another Member State. The Group acknowledges that, in order to maximise the potential benefits of SEPA, it is necessary to address obstacles to cross-border opening and switching of bank accounts.
 
4