La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Access Audit An Lanntair

De
13 pages
HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITYInclusive Environmental Access and Design CourseModule 5An Lanntair Arts centreStornowayIsle of LewisAccess Audit ReportCarried out by Joseph Thomas1ContentsIntroduction 12External Environment and Approach3Entrance and ReceptionHorizontal Circulation 4Vertical Circulation 5W.C Facilities 6Auditorium 78Emergency Evacuation9Audit SummaryRecommendations 10References 1112Legislative ContextAppendix A 131. IntroductionThis audit is being carried out as an exercise for module 5 of theHeriot-Watt University access course.This is a report of an Access Audit of the An Lanntair Arts Centreconducted by Joseph Thomas. BS8300 standards will used for thisaudit.The An Lanntair Arts Centre is situated On the Stornoway seafront withthe main entrance on the corner of Kenneth Street and Francis Street.The centre opened its doors on 1st October 2005 and was officially openedthby the First Minister on the 13 February 2006.The building comprises of two floors of which the ground floor is on two2levels accessed by a lift or short flight of stairs. The reception, shop andgallery are found on the upper ground floor, the artists dressing rooms andlounge area, which include an accessible toilet and shower are on the lowerground floor. There is also an art room and an accessible toilet on this level,as well as access to the auditorium, which is the largest area andencompasses all floors.On he first floor is the restaurant and bar areas, ...
Voir plus Voir moins

Vous aimerez aussi

HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY
Inclusive Environmental Access and Design Course
Module 5
An Lanntair Arts centre
Stornoway
Isle of Lewis
Access Audit Report
Carried out by Joseph Thomas
1Contents
Introduction 1
2External Environment and Approach
3Entrance and Reception
Horizontal Circulation 4
Vertical Circulation 5
W.C Facilities 6
Auditorium 7
8Emergency Evacuation
9Audit Summary
Recommendations 10
References 11
12Legislative Context
Appendix A 13
1. Introduction
This audit is being carried out as an exercise for module 5 of the
Heriot-Watt University access course.
This is a report of an Access Audit of the An Lanntair Arts Centre
conducted by Joseph Thomas. BS8300 standards will used for this
audit.
The An Lanntair Arts Centre is situated On the Stornoway seafront with
the main entrance on the corner of Kenneth Street and Francis Street.
The centre opened its doors on 1st October 2005 and was officially opened
thby the First Minister on the 13 February 2006.
The building comprises of two floors of which the ground floor is on two
2levels accessed by a lift or short flight of stairs. The reception, shop and
gallery are found on the upper ground floor, the artists dressing rooms and
lounge area, which include an accessible toilet and shower are on the lower
ground floor. There is also an art room and an accessible toilet on this level,
as well as access to the auditorium, which is the largest area and
encompasses all floors.
On he first floor is the restaurant and bar areas, again there is an
accessible toilet on this floor also.
The third floor is mainly given over to offices, with a community room and
access to the auditorium at the upper level. This floor is mainly for staff
use.
The audit follows a tour sequence with the approach to the building from
a drop off area, into reception then horizontal circulation on the ground
floor and progressing upwards with horizontal circulation on each floor.
The report will highlight areas of good practice as well as identifying
possible hazards and barriers; recommendations will be given in section 10.
A priority code will be used as follows:
1. An area, which gives immediate concern for the safety of
disabled people and should be dealt with as a matter of some
urgency.
2. An area, requiring design work and/or expense funded from a
capital expenditure budget.
3. An item of minor cost that could be covered as minor work or as
part of a routine maintenance schedule.
4. An item requiring little or no expense, which may be
dealt with immediately.
2. External Environment and Approach
There are no designated accessible parking bays adjacent to the building or
within convenient walking distance of the centre; the footpaths are narrow
and unsuitable for wheelchair users.
The main entrance is on a busy thoroughfare; the main car park and bus
station is a two-minute walk away on the seafront. The surfacing leading
up to the front of the building is made up of stone blocks which although
they give a level surface at this time there is the potential in the future
for a trip hazard to occur.
The centre is easily identifiable and is well lit in the evenings. There is a
drop off area in front of the centre with dropped kerbs from Kenneth
3Street and there is sufficient space for possibly three, but at least two
accessible parking bays adjacent to the building. It is recommended that
accessible parking bays should be marked out in the forecourt adjacent
to the building. This is a code 1 priority. Photographs 1 to 6 Annex A
3. Entrance and Reception
The main entrance door is a revolving glass door with a clearly
distinguishable façade, immediately to the right of this is an accessible
power operated glass door, although the door opens outwards it does so
slowly enough to allow a wheelchair user to easily manoeuvre through it,
signage could be better on this door.
The reception area is very spacious and clear of any obsructions; the
reception desk is suitable for approach and use from both sides by people
either standing or seated. The reception area is well lit; the shop is next to
reception and is open plan with plenty of space to allow wheelchair users
access purchases are made at reception.
There is however a noticeable lack of signage in this area.
It is recommended that an inductive loop be installed, code 3 Priority
and that signage that is both large enough for people with vision
impairments to be able to see and place at ideally two levels so that
wheelchair user are not having to constantly look up in order to see the
signs. This is a code 4. Priority. Photographs 7 to 12 Annex A
4. Horizontal Circulation
The gallery is spacious and easily accessible from the reception area, on
leaving the gallery a small flight of stairs takes you to the lower ground
floor areas, there is a lift to this floor also from the reception. There is an
accessible toilet that well meets the needs of wheelchair users but is spoil
by the fact that it is not easily recognisable as a toilet, larger signage
needed.
Connecting doors are easily opened; corridors are well lit and wide enough
to allow wheelchair users to manoeuvre. The art room is accessible and
spacious, the artists dressing room and rest area is well equipped, spacious
and has an accessible toilet and shower room. Signage is not very good
throughout this floor and is a code 4 priority
The first floor is a restaurant and bar area that is open plan and is well laid
out, with a good variety of seating available. It is well lit both by natural
4light from the large glass area in the restaurant affording customers a view
of the Stornoway sea front. The restaurant seating arrangements are
suitable for disabled people including wheelchair users, both the bar and
restaurant are table service, even so the bar is at two levels to allow use by
standing and seated persons. This floor has an accessible toilet close to the
lift. The staff in these areas have received disability awareness training
and are most helpful. Again signage is not very good and is a code 4
priority.
Photographs 13 to 20 Annex A
5. Vertical Circulation
Vertical circulation is by lift or by stairs. The lift car is large enough for a
wheelchair user and carer and it has suitable support rails. The controls are
easily visible, tactile and within easy reach of all users, it has audio floor
indication, it has separate entrance and exit facilities, therefore a
wheelchair user will be facing the exit when they reach their desired floor
and the door operation is slow enough to allow entry and exit.
There are stairs to all floors, which in the main are carpeted with easily
identifiable nosings and handrails on both sides. There are fire doors
leading to the stairwells on each floor, the stairwells have a refuge area on
all levels and are well lit. There are no tactile surfaces at the top or bottom
of the stairs.
However the main stairway to the first floor from the reception area has
four fully carpeted stairs with nosings, but the remaining steps consist of
treads and no sings but there are no risers, this is a trip hazard for
visually impaired, and ambient disabled people. There are handrails with
clear glass panels on both sides; the glass panels could be made more
tactile for visually impaired people.
It is recommended that wooden risers be fitted flush with the treads
on the main stairs from the reception area to the first floor; this is a
code 1 priority. A tactile surface be placed at the top and bottom of
each flight of stairs, this is a code 3 priority.
The clear glass panels could be made more visible, by the use of
suitably sized Stickers similar to those on the revolving doors, this
is a code 4 priority Photographs 9 to 12 and 25 to 28
6. W.C. Facilities
5The toilet facilities in the centre are very good, with several accessible
toilets located on the floors that the public have access to. As well as in
the artists dressing room and rest area. The facilities within the
accessible toilets meet BS 8300 standards. It is recommended that
toilet signposting could be better and at a height that can easily be
seen by wheelchair users. This is a code 4 priority.
7. Auditorium
This is the largest area in the centre and encompasses all levels there is
access from the ground floor and the second floor (Restaurant). Seating is
in rows that step up from front to rear, several of the front rows of seats
are removable to accommodate wheelchair users, who can also access the
rear from the second floor where there are suitable areas for wheelchair
users to view the event.
There are steps down both sides of the auditorium with some blue lights
on the sidewalls, but there are none that actually illuminate the steps.
There are no handrails fitted making it hazardous for ambient disabled
and visually impaired people.
It is recommended that handrails be fitted as soon as possible as this
is a code 1 priority.
A method of illuminating the steps when the auditorium is in darkness
should be considered, as this is a potential hazard for visually
impaired and ambient disabled people. This is a code 2 priority.
An inductive loop should be fitted to allow people with hearing
impairments can enjoy the entertainment provided in this facility. This
is a code 3 Priority Photographs 21 and 22
8. Emergency Evacuation
Management has an emergency evacuation plan, with designated escape
routes, access to the stairwells on each floor is by means of a fire door,
and there is a refuge in the stairwell on each floor. There is a further
refuge in the corridor on the ground floor to allow disabled people to rest
as they are evacuated.
There are two fire exits from the auditorium one of which is ramped and
leads directly to the outside of the building. There is an audio alarm system
only
A major fire exercise was carried out in the building in the middle of
March 2006 wheelchair user were included to test the evacuation
procedure, and the local fire service was involved.
6The only recommendation is that signage suitable for all, indicating the
evacuation routes is inserted as a code 4 priority
9. Audit Summary
This is a relatively new building and a lot of thought has gone into the design
to make it inclusive to all, in the most part the recommendations are to do
with signage and can be easily rectified. The staff are very helpful and
about half have received disability awareness training with the remainder
scheduled to do so in the near future. If and when all the recommendations
are put in place it will become an inclusive building.
10. Recommendations
The recommendations are highlighted at the end of each section and are
copied below in their priority codes:
 Code 4 Priority
 Signage throughout the building, especially the toilets and
evacuation routes to be off a size large enough for persons
with vision impairments and at a level visible to wheelchair
users.
 The clear glass panels on the stairway from the reception area
to the first should be made more visible, for example by the use
of suitably sized stickers similar to those on the revolving doors,
 Code 1 Priority
 It is recommended that accessible parking bays should be
marked out in the forecourt adjacent to the building.
 It is recommended that wooden risers be fitted flush with the
treads on the main stairs from the reception area to the first
floor;
 It is recommended that the handrails be fitted in the
auditorium as soon as possible. (It is understood that the
handrails have been purchased)
 Code 3 Priority
 A tactile surface be placed at the top and bottom of each flight
of stairs, surfaces should be slip-resistant, a ‘corduroy’ hazard
warning surface of raised ribs (no more than 6mm high) set
parallel to the step nosings, as a warning to people with impaired
7vision of the presence of a trip hazard.
 An inductive loop to be fitted in reception and the auditorium.
 Code 2 Priority
 A method of illuminating the steps when the auditorium is in
darkness should be considered, as this is a potential hazard for
visually impaired and ambient disabled people.
11. References
 British Standard 8300
 Course Notes
 Centre for Accessible Environments (checklist)
 An Lanntair (Some photo’s)
12. Legislative Context
The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995 part lll covers Access to
goods, facilities, services and premises.
 Since December 1996 it has been unlawful under the Act for service
providers to treat disabled people less favourably for a reason related
to their disability;
 Since October 1999 service providers have had to make reasonable
adjustments for disabled people such as providing extra help or making
 changes to the way they provide their services.
 From October 2004 service providers may have to make other
reasonable adjustments in relation to the physical features of their
premises to overcome physical barriers to access.
The Disability Rights Commission. (DRC) has produced a code of practice,
which is intended to explain the principles of the law, to illustrate how the
Act might operate in certain situations and to provide general guidance on
good practice.
The code does not impose legal obligations, however it can be used in
evidence in legal proceedings under the Act.
As an employer you have a duty under part 2 of the Act, and as a provider
of goods, facilities, services and premises you also have a duty under part
lll of the Act.
813. Annex A
Approach to Arts Centre
2.
3.
Main Entrance Possible hazards
5. 6.
9Reception Area
10

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin