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Project Gutenberg's A Child's Garden of Verses, by Robert Louis Stevenson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: A Child's Garden of Verses Author: Robert Louis Stevenson Illustrator: Maria L. Kirk Release Date: May 8, 2009 [EBook #28722] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A CHILD'S GARDEN OF VERSES ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Emmy and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
A CHILD'S GARDEN OF VERSES FIFTH IMPRESSION
"Stories All Children Love" A SET OF CHILDREN'S CLASSICS THAT SHOULD BE IN EVERY WINTER HOME AND SUMMER COTTAGE ———— Vinzi BYJOHANNA SPYRI Translated by ELISABETH P. STORK
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Mäzli BYJOHANNA SPYRI Translated by ELISABETH P. STORK
Cornelli BYJOHANNA SPYRI Translated by ELISABETH P. STORK
A Child's Garden of Verses BYROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
The Little Lame Prince and Other Stories BYMISS MULOCK
Gulliver's Travels BYJONATHAN SWIFT
The Water Babies BYCHARLES KINGSLEY
Pinocchio BYC. COLLODI
Robinson Crusoe BYDANIEL DEFOE
HeidiBYJOHANNA SPYRI Translated by ELISABETH P. STORK
The Cuckoo Clock BYMRS. MOLESWORTH
The Swiss Family Robinson EDITED BYG. E. MITTON
The Princess and Curdie BYGEORGE MACDONALD
The Princess and the Goblin BYGEORGE MACDONALD At the Back of the North Wind BYGEORGE MACDONALD
A Dog of FlandersBY"OUIDA"
BimbiBY"OUIDA"
Mopsa, the FairyBYJEAN INGELOW
Tales of Fairyland
BYFERGUS HUME
Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales
Each Volume Beautifully Illustrated in Color. Decorated Cloth. Other Books in This Set are in Preparation.
THEGARDENER  O how much wiser you would be  To play at Indian wars with me!
A CHILD'S GARDEN OF VERSES
BY
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ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLOR BY MARIA L. KIRK
PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY
ILLUSTRATIONS COPYRIGHT, 1919, BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY
PRINTED BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY AT THE WASHINGTON SQUARE PRESS PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A.
TO ALISON CUNNINGHAM FROM HER BOY Fool eht rs yh:eka fed moruny rtwo ywakaAednw tahcng nights you la For your most comfortable hand That led me through the uneven land: For all the story-books you read: For all the pains you comforted: For all you pitied, all you bore, In sad and happy days of yore:— My second Mother, my first Wife, The angel of my infant life— From the sick child, now well and old, Take, nurse, the little book you hold! And grant it, Heaven, that all who read May find as dear a nurse at need, And every child who lists my rhyme, In the bright, fireside, nursery clime,
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May hear it in as kind a voice As made my childish days rejoice!
CONTENTS  PAGE I. BED INSUMMER15 II. A THOUGHT17 III. AT THESEASIDE18 IV. YOUNGNIGHTTHOUGHT19 V. WHOLEDUTY OFCHILDREN21 VI. RAIN22 VII. PIRATESTORY23 VIII. FOREIGNLANDS25 IX. WINDYNIGHTS29 X. TRAVEL30 XI. SINGING34 XII. LOOKINGFORWARD35 XIII. A GOODPLAY36 XIV. WHEREGO THEBOATS?38 XV. AUNTIE'SSKIRTS40 XVI. THELAND OFCOUNTERPANE41 XVII. THELAND OFNOD43 XVIII. MYSHADOW45 XIX. SYSTEM49 XX. A GOODBOY50 XXI. ESCAPE ATBEDTIME53 XXII. MARCHINGSONG55 XXIII. THECOW57 XXIV. HAPPYTHOUGHT59 XXV. THEWIND60 XXVI. KEEPSAKEMILL62 XXVII. GOOD ANDBADCHILDREN65 XXVIII. FOREIGNCHILDREN69 XXIX. THESUN'STRAVELS73 XXX. THELAMPLIGHTER75 XXXI. MYBED IS ABOAT77 XXXII. THEMOON79 XXXIII. THESWING81 XXXIV. TIMETORISE83 XXXV. LOOKING-GLASSRIVER84 XXXVI. FAIRYBREAD87 XXXVII. FROM ARAILWAYCARRIAGE88 XXXVIII. WINTER-TIME90 XXXIX. THEHAYLOFT93 XL. FAREWELL TO THEFARM95 XLI. NORTH-WESTPASSAGE:
R. L. S.
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 1. Good Night97  2. Shadow March99  3. In Port101 THE CHILD ALONE PAGE I. THEUNSEENPLAYMATE105 II. MYSHIP ANDI109 III. MYKINGDOM111 IV. PICTURE-BOOKS INWINTER115 V. MYTREASURES119 VI. BLOCKCITY121 VII. THELAND OFSTORYBOOKS125 VIII. ARMIES IN THEFIRE129 IX. THELITTLELAND133 GARDEN DAYS PAGE I. NIGHT ANDDAY141 II. NESTEGGS147 III. THEFLOWERS151 IV. SUMMERSUN153 V. THEDUMBSOLDIER157 VI. AUTUMNFIRES163 VII. THEGARDENER165 VIII. HISTORICALASSOCIATIONS169 ENVOYS PAGE I. TOWILLIE ANDHENRIETTA177 II. TOMYMOTHER179 II. TOAUNTIE180 IV. TOMINNIE181 V. TOMYNAME-CHILD187 VI. TOANYREADER190
ILLUSTRATIONS
 THEGARDENER O how much wiser you would be To play at Indian wars with me! PIRATESTORY Three of us aboard in the basket on the lea. THELAND OFNOD And up the mountain-sides of dreams. THEWIND I felt you push, I heard you call,
PAGE Frontispiece 23 43 60
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I could not see yourself at all— THESWING Up in the air and down. THEHAYLOFT The mice that in these mountains dwell No happier are than I. MYSHIP ANDI And my ship it keeps a-turning all around and all about. THELITTLELAND In that forest to and fro I can wander, I can go.
A CHILD'S GARDEN OF VERSES
I BED IN SUMMER IN wi I gnteru teta pgin nAthdrd s es ybyloel wacdnell-gith. In summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people's feet Still going past me in the street. And does it not seem hard to you, When all the sky is clear and blue, And I should like so much to play, To have to go to bed by day?
II A THOUGHT IT is very nice to think The world is full of meat and drink, With little children saying grace
81 93 109 134
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In every Christian kind of place.
III AT THE SEASIDE N I was down beside the sea WA wooHEee av mtoht eg ye neddaps To dig the sandy shore. My holes were empty like a cup, In every hole the sea came up, Till it could come no more.
IV YOUNG NIGHT THOUGHT ALL night long and every night, When my mamma puts out the light, I see the people marching by, As plain as day, before my eye. Armies and emperors and kings, All carrying different kinds of things, And marching in so grand a way, You never saw the like by day. So fine a show was never seen, At the great circus on the green; For every kind of beast and man Is marching in that caravan. At first they move a little slow, But still the faster on they go, And still beside them close I keep Until we reach the town of Sleep.
V WHOLE DUTY OF CHILDREN CHILD should always say what's true
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And speak when he is spoken to, And behave mannerly at table; At least as far as he is able.
VI
RAIN HE rain is raining all around, TIt falls on field and tree, It rains on the umbrellas here, And on the ships at sea.
PIRATESTORY Three of us aboard in the basket on the lea
VII
PIRATE STORY
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eht iws T,gneerh tin mhedoeabyw EEo  fsua lfao tTHRkelihe tea mw dono eeht evawra sing,And  the sprwoni gni yra elbhe tr,aie thn  iera sdniW.ael ehon tket  bas the dniobrasua o  f
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VIII FOREIGN LANDS Utho che ryerre tPtni t lib bu me?ttles ohWeohlcmilu d I held the trunk with both my hands And looked abroad on foreign lands. I saw the next door garden lie, Adorned with flowers, before my eye, And many pleasant places more That I had never seen before. I saw the dimpling river pass And be the sky's blue looking-glass; The dusty roads go up and down With people tramping in to town. If I could find a higher tree Farther and farther I should see, To where the grown-up river slips Into the sea among the ships, To where the roads on either hand Lead onward into fairy land, Where all the children dine at five, And all the playthings come alive.
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rehee arav w teserehahs s taW.aeventure,ll we adhttaw 'et -oad y oryWat,oafl arena rehtaew eht fy a ng beerid st teblli S?ahtsra ot irfA ,acts-ariee ongthf boe taT, orPvodineec, or Babylon, or ot ffo ?rabalaMt bu! Hi a'srehedaors uqoriw n-an thng oaCae segrni giwwoa c-ahthe meadttle on e llpacsdna 'ew Qur!k,ic athoa ryeac shtdaa sam 're theyem, e tha ruobrah eht sit keic whe,Tben  theshore.dnt ehg raed nsi
IX WINDY NIGHTS and stars are set, W whe terevenWhhe moon ENEVER tgi,Hhsih ni d All night long in the dark and wet, A man goes riding by. Late in the night when the fires are out, Why does he gallop and gallop about? Whenever the trees are crying aloud, And ships are tossed at sea, By, on the highway, low and loud, By at the gallop goes he. By at the gallop he goes, and then By he comes back at the gallop again.
X TRAVEL ISHOULD like to rise and go Where the golden apples grow;— Where below another sky Parrot islands anchored lie, And, watched by cockatoos and goats, Lonely Crusoes building boats;— Where in sunshine reaching out Eastern cities, miles about, Are with mosque and minaret Among sandy gardens set, And the rich goods from near and far Hang for sale in the bazaar; Where the Great Wall round China goes, And on one side the desert blows, And with bell and voice and drum, Cities on the other hum;— Where are forests, hot as fire, Wide as England, tall as a spire, Full of apes and cocoa-nuts And the negro hunters' huts;— Where the knotty crocodile Lies and blinks in the Nile, And the red flamingo flies Hunting fish before his eyes;— Where in un les, near and far,
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