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Letters of Franklin K. Lane

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Title: The Letters of Franklin K. Lane
Author: Franklin K. Lane  Edited by Anne Wintermute Lane and Louise Herrick Wall
Release Date: July, 2003 [Etext #4206] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on December 01, 2001] Edition: 10 Language: English
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THE LETTERS OF FRANKLIN K. LANE
Personal and Political
EDITED BYANNEWINTERMUTELANEAND LOUISEHERRICK WALL
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
PREFACE
Prom the thousands of typewritten letters found in his files, and from the many holograph letters sent to me from his friends in different parts of the country, we have attempted, in this volume, to select chiefly those letters which tell the story of Franklin K. Lane's life as it unfolded itself in service to his country which was his passion. A few technical letters have been included, because they represent some incomplete and original phases of the work he attempted, —work, to which he brought an intensity of interest and devotion that usually is given only to private enterprise.
In editing his letters we have omitted much, but we have in no way changed anything that he wrote. Even where, in his haste, there has been an obvious slip of the pen, we have left it. Owing to his dictating to many stenographers, with
their varying methods of punctuation and paragraphing, and because the letters that he wrote himself were often dashed off on the train, in bed, or in a hurried five minutes before some engagement, we found in them no uniformity of punctuation. In writing hastily he used only a frequent dash and periods; these letters we have made agree with those which were more formally written.
With the oncoming of war his correspondence enormously increased— the more demanded of him, the more he seemed able to accomplish. Upon opening his files it took us weeks to run through and destroy just the requests for patronage, for commissions, passports, appointments as chaplains, promotions, demands from artists who desired to work on camouflage, farmers and chemists who wished exemption, requests for appointments to the War Department; letters asking for every kind of a position from that of night- watchman to that of Brigadier-General. For his friends, and even those who had no special claim upon him, knew that they could count on his interest in them.
One of his secretaries, Joseph J. Cotter, a man he greatly trusted, in describing his office work says: "Whatever was of human interest, interested Mr. Lane. His researches were by no means limited to the Department of the Interior. For instance, I remember that at one time, before the matter had been given any consideration in any other quarter, he asked Secretary of Agriculture Houston to come to his office, in the Interior Department, and went with him into the question of the number of ships it would take to transport our soldiers to the other side. And as a result of this conference, a plan was laid before the Secretary of War. I remember this particularly because it necessitated my looking up dead-weight tonnage, and other matters, with which I was entirely unfamiliar. …
"I have never known any one who could with equal facility follow an intricate line of thought through repeated interruptions. I have seen Mr. Lane, when interrupted in the middle of an involved sentence of dictation, talk on some other subject for five or ten minutes and return to his dictation, taking it up where he left it and completing the sentence so that it could be typed as dictated, and this without the stenographer's telling him at what point he had been interrupted."
His letters are peculiarly autobiographical, for whenever his active mind was engaged on some personal, political, or philosophical problem, his thought turned naturally to that friend with whom he would most like to discuss the subject, and, if he could possibly make the time, to him he wrote just what thoughts raced through his mind. To Ambassador Page he wrote in 1918, "I have a very old-fashioned love for writing from day to day what pops into my mind, contradicting each day what I said the day before, and gathering from my friends their impressions and their spirit in the same way." And in another letter he says, "Now I have gossiped, and preached, and prophesied, and mourned, and otherwise revealed what passes through a wandering mind in half an hour, so I send you at the close of this screed, my blessing, which is a poor gift."
At home on Sunday morning before the fire, he would often write many letters—some of them twenty pages in length and some mere scrappy notes. He wrote with a pencil on a pad on his knee, rapidly stripping off the sheets for me to read, in his desire to share all that was his, even his innermost thoughts.
To the many correspondents who have generously returned to me their letters, and with no restrictions as to their use, I wish particularly to express here my profound gratitude. The limits of one volume have made it possible to use only a part of those received, deeply as I have regretted the necessity of omitting any of them. In making these acknowledgments I wish especially to thank John H. Wigmore, since to him we owe all the early letters— the only ones covering that period.
For possible future use I shall be grateful for any letters that I have not already seen, and if in the preparation of these letters for publication we have allowed any mistakes to slip in, I hope that the error will be called to my attention.
Anne Wintermute Lane March, 1922
CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION
Youth—Education—Characteristics
II. POLITICS AND JOURNALISM. 1884-1894
Politics—Newspaper Work—New York—Buying into Tacoma News —Marriage—Sale of Newspaper
LETTERS: To John H. Wigmore To John H. Wigmore To John H. Wigmore
To John H. Wigmore
III. LAW PRACTICEAND POLITICAL ACTIVITIES. 1894-1906
Law—Drafting New City Charter—Elected as City and County Attorney— Gubernatorial Campaign—Mayoralty Campaign—Earthquake —Appointment as Interstate Commerce Commissioner
LETTERS: To P. T. Spurgeon To John H. Wigmore To John H. Wigmore To John H. Wigmore To Lyman Naugle To John H. Wigmore To John H. Wigmore To William R. Wheeler To Orva G. Williams To the Iroquois Club, Los Angeles, California To Isadore B. Dockweiler To Edward B. Whitney To Hon. Theodore Roosevelt To Benjamin Ide Wheeler To William E. Smythe To John H. Wigmore To Benjamin Ide Wheeler To William R. Wheeler To John H. Wigmore To William R. Wheeler
IV. RAILROAD AND NATIONAL POLITICS. 1906-1912
Increased Powers of Interstate Commerce Commission—Harriman Inquiry—Railroad Regulation—Letters to Roosevelt
LETTERS: To Edward F. Adams To Benjamin Ide Wheeler To Elihu Root To E. B. Beard To George W. Lane To Charles K. McClatchy To Lawrence F. Abbott To John H. Wigmore To Mrs. Franklin K. Lane To Theodore Roosevelt To John H. Wigmore To William R. Wheeler To Lawrence F. Abbott To Charles K. McClatchy To Charles K. McClatchy To John Crawford Burns To Theodore Roosevelt To Samuel G. Blythe To Sidney E. Mezes To John H. Wigmore To George W. Lane To Carl Snyder From Oliver Wendell Holmes To Oliver Wendell Holmes To John H. Wigmore To Daniel Willard To John McNaught
V. EXPRESS CASE—CABINET APPOINTMENTS 1912-1913
Politics—Democratic Convention—Nomination of Wilson —Report on Express Case—Democratic Victory—Problems for New Administration —On Cabinet Appointments
LETTERS: To Albert Shaw To Curt G. Pfeiffer To George W. Lane
To Oscar S. Straus To Benjamin Ide Wheeler, To George W. Lane. To John H. Wigmore. To Timothy Spellacy. To Adolph C. Miller. To William F. McComba, To Hugo K. Asher. To Francis G. Newlands. To Woodrow Wilson. To William J. Bryan. To James D. Phelan. To Herbert Harley. To Charles K. McClatchy. To Ernest S. Simpson. To Fairfax Harrison. To James P. Brown. To Adolph C. Miller. To Edward M. House. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To Sidney E. Mezes. To John H. Wigmore. To John H. Wigmore. To Joseph N. Teal. To Edward M. House. To Mitchell Innes.
VI. SECRETARYOFTHEINTERIOR. 1913-1915
Appointment as Secretary of the Interior—Reorganization of the Department—Home Club—Bills on Public Lands
LETTERS:
To John H. Wigmore. To Walter H. Page. To Edwin A. Alderman. To Theodore Roosevelt. To Lawrence F. Abbott. To William M. Bole. To Fairfax Harrison. To Frank Reese. To Mark Sullivan. To Edward M. House. To James H. Barry. To Edward F. Adams. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson, To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To Albert Shaw. To Charles K. Field. To Frederic J. Lane. To Edward E. Leake. To William R. Wheeler. To—. To his Brother on his Birthday. To Cordenio Severance. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Theodore Roosevelt. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Lawrence F. Abbott.
VII. EUROPEAN WAR AND PERSONAL CONCERNS. 1914-1915
Endorsement of Hoover—German Audacity—LL.D. from Alma Mater —England's Sea Policy—Christmas letters
LETTERS: To William J. Bryan. To John Crawford Burns. To Alexander Vogelsang. To John H. Wigmore. To John Crawford Burns. To Edward J. Wheeler. To John Crawford Burns.
To William P. Lawlor. To William G. McAdoo. To John Crawford Burns. To E. W. Scripps. To George W. Wickersham. To Frederic J. Lane. To John Crawford Burns. To Eugene A. Avery. To John F. Davis. To Dick Mead. To John Crawford Burns. To Sidney E. Mezes. To Cordenio Severance. To Frederick Dixon. To Robert H. Patchin. To Francis R. Wall. To John H. Wigmore. To Mrs. Adolph C. Miller. To Mrs. Magnus Andersen. To Mrs. Adolph C. Miller.
VIII. AMERICAN AND MEXICAN AFFAIRS.
On Writing English—Visit to Monticello—Citizenship for Indians—On Religion—American-Mexican Joint Commission
LETTERS: To William M. Bole. To Mrs. Adolph C. Miller. To Edward F. Adams. To Carl Snyder. To Mrs. Franklin K. Lane. To Will Irwin. To—. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Frederic J. Lane. To Frank L Cobb. To George W. Wickersham. To H. B. Brougham. To Frederic J. Lane. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Mrs. Franklin K. Lane. To Mrs. Adolph C. Miller. To Mrs. Franklin K. Lane. To William R. Wheeler. To James S. Harlan. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Alexander Vogelsang. To Frederic J. Lane. To Frank I. Cobb. To R. M. Fitzgerald. To James K. Moffitt. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To Roland Cotton Smith. To James H. Barry.
IX. CABINET TALK AND WAR PLANS. 1917
Cabinet Meetings—National Council of Defense—Bernstorff—War—Plan for Railroad Consolidation—U-Boat Sinkings Revealed—Alaska
LETTERS: To George W. Lane. To George W. Lane. To George W. Lane. To Frank I. Cobb. To George W. Lane. To George W. Lane. To Edward J. Wheeler. To George W. Lane. To Frank I. Cobb. To George W. Lane. To George W. Lane. To Frank I. Cobb.
To Will Irwin. To Robert Lansing. To Henry Lane Eno. To George B. Dorr. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To John O'H. Cosgrave.
X. CABINET NOTES IN WAR-TIME. 1918
Notes on Cabinet Meetings—School Gardens—A Democracy Lacks Foresight—Use of National Resources—Washington in War-time—The Sacrifice of War—Farms for Soldiers
LETTERS: To Franklin K. Lane, Jr. To George W. Lane. To Albert Shaw. To Walter H. Page. To John Lyon. To Frank Lyon. To Miss Genevieve King. To John McNaught. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Allan Pollok. To E. S. Pillsbury. To William Marion Reedy. Notes on Cabinet Meetings. To Daniel Willard. To James H. Hawley. To Samuel G. Blythe. To George W. Lane. To Edgar C. Bradley.
XI. AFTER-WAR PROBLEMS—LEAVINGWASHINGTON. 1919
After-war Problems—Roosevelt Memorials—Americanization—Religion —Responsibility of Press—Resignation
LETTERS: To E. C. Bradley. To George W. Lane. To George W. Lane. To William Boyce Thompson. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To E. S. Martin. To George W. Lane. To Van H. Manning. To E. C. Bradley. To Mrs. Louise Herrick Wall. To—. To M. A. Mathew. To Herbert C. Pell, Jr. To Henry P. Davison. To George W. Lane. To C. S. Jackson. To John Crawford Burns. To Frank I. Cobb. To Mrs. Louise Herrick Wall. To Mrs. M. A. Andersen. To George W. Lane. To Daniel J. O'Neill. To Hamlin Garland. To Hugo K. Asher. To Admiral Gary Grayson. To Herbert C. Pell, Jr. To Hon. Woodrow Wilson. To Frank W. Mondell. To Robert W. De Forest.
XII. POLITICAL COUNSEL—LINCOLN'S EYES. 1920
Suggestions to Democratic Nominee for President—On Election of Senators—Lost Leaders—Lincoln's Eyes—William James's Letters
LETTERS: To William Phelps Eno. To Roland Cotton Smith. To James M. Cox. To Timothy Spellacy. To Edward L. Doheny. To Franklin D. Roosevelt. To Mrs. George Ehle. To Isadore B. Dockweiler. To Hall McAllister. To Mrs. George Ehle. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To John W. Hallowell. To John W. Hallowell. To Robert Lansing. To Carl Snyder. To William R. Wheeler. To George Otis Smith. To George W. Wickersham. Lincoln's Eyes. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. To Lathrop Brown. To Timothy Spellacy. To Frank I. Cobb. To John G. Gehring. To John W. Hallowell. To John G. Gehring.
XIII. LETTERS TO ELIZABETH. 1919-1920
LETTERS: To Mrs. Ralph Ellis.
XIV. FRIENDS AND THEGREAT HOPE. 1921
Need for Democratic Program—Religious Faith—Men who have Influenced Thought—A Sounder Industrial Life —A Super-University for Ideas —"I Accept"—Fragment
LETTERS: To Mrs. Philip C. Kauffmann. To Benjamin Ide Wheeler. To Lathrop Brown. To Mrs. George Ehle. To Mrs. William Phillips. To James H. Barry. To Michael A. Spellacy. To William R. Wheeler. To V. C. Scott O'Connor. Letter sent to several friends. To John G. Gehring. To Lathrop Brown. To Lathrop Brown. To Adolph C. Miller. To John G. Gehring. To John W. Hallowell. To Curt G. Pfeiffer. To John G. Gehring. To D. M. Reynolds. To Mrs. Cordenio Severance. To Alexander Vogelsang. To James S. Harlan. To Adolph C. Miller. To Lathrop Brown. To John G. Gehring. To John H. Wigmore. To Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. To John W. Hallowell. To John G. Gehring. To Hall McAllister. To Mrs. Frederic Peterson. To Roland Cotton Smith. To John G. Gehring.
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