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Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 1

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1, Edited by Charles Dudley Warner This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 Editor: Charles Dudley Warner Release Date: May 17, 2004 [eBook #12369] Language: English Character set encoding: iso-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LIBRARY OF THE WORLD'S BEST LITERATURE, ANCIENT AND MODERN, VOL. 1*** E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland, Charlie Kirschner, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team LIBRARY OF THE WORLD'S BEST LITERATURE ANCIENT AND MODERN VOL. I. CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER EDITOR HAMILTON WRIGHT MABIE LUCIA GILBERT RUNKLE GEORGE HENRY WARNER ASSOCIATE EDITORS Connoisseur Edition PREFACE he plan of this Work is simple, and yet it is novel. In its distinctive features it differs from any compilation that has yet been made. Its main purpose is to present to American households a mass of good reading. But it goes much beyond this. For in selecting this reading it draws upon all literatures of all time and of every race, and thus becomes a conspectus of the thought and intellectual evolution of man from the beginning.
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The Project Gutenberg eBook,
Library of the World's Best
Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol.
1, Edited by Charles Dudley Warner
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1
Editor: Charles Dudley Warner
Release Date: May 17, 2004 [eBook #12369]
Language: English
Character set encoding: iso-8859-1
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LIBRARY OF THE
WORLD'S BEST LITERATURE, ANCIENT AND MODERN, VOL. 1***
E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland, Charlie Kirschner,
and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading
Team
LIBRARY OF THE
WORLD'S BEST LITERATURE
ANCIENT AND MODERN
VOL. I.
CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER
EDITORHAMILTON WRIGHT MABIE
LUCIA GILBERT RUNKLE
GEORGE HENRY WARNER
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Connoisseur Edition
PREFACE
he plan of this Work is simple, and yet it is novel. In its distinctive features it
differs from any compilation that has yet been made. Its main purpose is to
present to American households a mass of good reading. But it goes much
beyond this. For in selecting this reading it draws upon all literatures of all time
and of every race, and thus becomes a conspectus of the thought and
intellectual evolution of man from the beginning. Another and scarcely less
important purpose is the interpretation of this literature in essays by scholars
and authors competent to speak with authority.
The title, "A Library of the World's Best Literature," is strictly descriptive. It
means that what is offered to the reader is taken from the best authors, and is
fairly representative of the best literature and of all literatures. It may be
important historically, or because at one time it expressed the thought and
feeling of a nation, or because it has the character of universality, or because
the readers of to-day will find it instructive, entertaining, or amusing. The Work
aims to suit a great variety of tastes, and thus to commend itself as a household
companion for any mood and any hour. There is no intention of presenting
merely a mass of historical material, however important it is in its place, which
is commonly of the sort that people recommend others to read and do not read
themselves. It is not a library of reference only, but a library to be read. The
selections do not represent the partialities and prejudices and cultivation of any
one person, or of a group of editors even; but, under the necessary editorial
supervision, the sober judgment of almost as many minds as have assisted in
the preparation of these volumes. By this method, breadth of appreciation has
been sought.
The arrangement is not chronological, but alphabetical, under the names of the
authors, and, in some cases, of literatures and special subjects. Thus, in eachvolume a certain variety is secured, the heaviness or sameness of a mass of
antique, classical, or mediaeval material is avoided, and the reader obtains a
sense of the varieties and contrasts of different periods. But the work is not an
encyclopaedia, or merely a dictionary of authors. Comprehensive information
as to all writers of importance may be included in a supplementary reference
volume; but the attempt to quote from all would destroy the Work for reading
purposes, and reduce it to a herbarium of specimens.
In order to present a view of the entire literary field, and to make these volumes
especially useful to persons who have not access to large libraries, as well as
to treat certain literatures or subjects when the names of writers are unknown or
would have no significance to the reader, it has been found necessary to make
groups of certain nationalities, periods, and special topics. For instance, if the
reader would like to know something of ancient and remote literatures which
cannot well be treated under the alphabetical list of authors, he will find special
essays by competent scholars on the Accadian-Babylonian literature, on the
Egyptian, the Hindu, the Chinese, the Japanese, the Icelandic, the Celtic, and
others, followed by selections many of which have been specially translated for
this Work. In these literatures names of ascertained authors are given in the
Index. The intention of the essays is to acquaint the reader with the spirit,
purpose, and tendency of these writings, in order that he may have a
comparative view of the continuity of thought and the value of tradition in the
world. Some subjects, like the Arthurian Legends, the Nibelungen Lied, the
Holy Grail, Provençal Poetry, the Chansons and Romances, and the Gesta
Romanorum, receive a similar treatment. Single poems upon which the authors'
title to fame mainly rests, familiar and dear hymns, and occasional and modern
verse of value, are also grouped together under an appropriate heading, with
reference in the Index whenever the poet is known.
It will thus be evident to the reader that the Library is fairly comprehensive and
representative, and that it has an educational value, while offering constant and
varied entertainment. This comprehensive feature, which gives the Work
distinction, is, however, supplemented by another of scarcely less importance;
namely, the critical interpretive and biographical comments upon the authors
and their writings and their place in literature, not by one mind, or by a small
editorial staff, but by a great number of writers and scholars, specialists and
literary critics, who are able to speak from knowledge and with authority. Thus
the Library becomes in a way representative of the scholarship and wide
judgment of our own time. But the essays have another value. They give
information for the guidance of the reader. If he becomes interested in any
selections here given, and would like a fuller knowledge of the author's works,
he can turn to the essay and find brief observations and characterizations
which will assist him in making his choice of books from a library.
The selections are made for household and general reading; in the belief that
the best literature contains enough that is pure and elevating and at the same
time readable, to satisfy any taste that should be encouraged. Of course
selection implies choice and exclusion. It is hoped that what is given will be
generally approved; yet it may well happen that some readers will miss the
names of authors whom they desire to read. But this Work, like every other, has
its necessary limits; and in a general compilation the classic writings, and those
productions that the world has set its seal on as among the best, must
predominate over contemporary literature that is still on its trial. It should be
said, however, that many writers of present note and popularity are omitted
simply for lack of space. The editors are compelled to keep constantly in view
the wider field. The general purpose is to give only literature; and where
authors are cited who are generally known as philosophers, theologians,publicists, or scientists, it is because they have distinct literary quality, or
because their influence upon literature itself has been so profound that the
progress of the race could not be accounted for without them.
These volumes contain not only or mainly the literature of the past, but they aim
to give, within the limits imposed by such a view, an idea of contemporary
achievement and tendencies in all civilized countries. In this view of the
modern world the literary product of America and Great Britain occupies the
largest space.
It should be said that the plan of this Work could not have been carried out
without the assistance of specialists in many departments of learning, and of
writers of skill and insight, both in this country and in Europe. This assistance
has been most cordially given, with a full recognition of the value of the
enterprise and of the aid that the Library may give in encouraging and
broadening literary tastes. Perhaps no better service could be rendered the
American public at this period than the offer of an opportunity for a
comprehensive study of the older and the greater literatures of other nations. By
this comparison it can gain a just view of its own literature, and of its possible
mission in the world of letters.
THE ADVISORY COUNCIL
CRAWFORD H. TOY, A.M., LL.D.,
Professor of Hebrew,
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass.
THOMAS R. LOUNSBURY, LL.D., L.H.D.,
Professor of English in the Sheffield Scientific School of
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn.
WILLIAM M. SLOANE, PH.D., L.H.D.,
Professor of History and Political Science,
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N.J.
BRANDER MATTHEWS, A.M., LL.B.,
Professor of Literature,
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City.
JAMES B. ANGELL, LL.D.,
President of the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, Mich.
WILLARD FISKE, A.M., PH.D.,
Late Professor of the Germanic and Scandinavian
Languages and Literatures,
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, N.Y.EDWARD S. HOLDEN, A.M., LL.D.,
Director of the Lick Observatory, and Astronomer
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, Cal.
ALCÉE FORTIER, LIT.D.,
Professor of the Romance Languages,
TULANE UNIVERSITY, New Orleans, La.
WILLIAM P. TRENT, M.A.,
Dean of the Department of Arts and Sciences, and
Professor of English and History,
UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH, Sewanee, Tenn.
PAUL SHOREY, PH.D.,
Professor of Greek and Latin Literature,
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago, Ill.
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, LL.D.,
United States Commissioner of Education,
BUREAU OF EDUCATION, Washington, D.C.
MAURICE FRANCIS EGAN, A.M., LL.D.,
Professor of Literature in the
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington,
D.C.
NOTE OF ACKNOWLEDGMENT
wing to the many changes in the assignment of topics and engaging of writers
incident to so extended a publication as the Library of the World's Best
Literature, the Editor finds it impossible, before the completion of the work,
adequately to recognize the very great aid which he has received from a large
number of persons. A full list of contributors will be given in one of the
concluding volumes. He will expressly acknowledge also his debt to those who
have assisted him editorially, or in other special ways, in the preparation of
these volumes.
Both Editor and Publishers have endeavored to give full credit to every author
quoted, and to accompany every citation with ample notice of copyright
ownership. At the close of the work it is their purpose to express in a more
formal way their sense of obligation to the many publishers who have so
courteously given permission for this use of their property, and whose rights of
ownership it is intended thoroughly to protect.TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOL. I
ABÉLARD AND HÉLOISE (by Thomas Davidson) -- 1079-
1142
Letter of Héloise to Abélard
Abélard's Answer to Héloise
Vesper Hymn of Abélard
EDMOND ABOUT -- 1828-1885
The Capture ('The King of the Mountains')
Hadgi-Stavros (same)
The Victim ('The Man with the Broken Ear')
The Man without a Country (same)
ACCADIAN-BABYLONIAN AND ASSYRIAN LITERATURE
(by Crawford H. Toy)
Theogony
Revolt of Tiamat
Descent to the Underworld
The Flood
The Eagle and the Snake
The Flight of Etana
The God Zu
Adapa and the Southwind
Penitential Psalms
Inscription of Sennacherib
Invocation to the Goddess Beltis
Oracles of Ishtar of Arbela
An Erechite's Lament
ABIGAIL ADAMS (by Lucia Gilbert Runkle) -- 1744-1818
Letters--To her Husband:
May 24, 1775; June 15, 1775; June 18, 1775;
Nov. 27, 1775; April 20, 1777; June 8, 1779
To her Sister:
Sept. 5, 1784; May 10, 1785;
July 24, 1784; June 24, 1785
To her Niece
HENRY ADAMS -- 1838-
Auspices of the War of 1812
What the War of 1812 Demonstrated
Battle between the Constitution and the Guerrière
JOHN ADAMS -- 1735-1826
At the French Court ('Diary')
Character of Franklin (Letter to the Boston Patriot)
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS -- 1767-1848
Letter to his Father, at the Age of Ten
From the Memoirs, at the Age of Eighteen
From the Memoirs, Jan. 14, 1831; June 7, 1833; Sept. 9,1833
The Mission of America (Fourth of July Oration, 1821)
The Right of Petition (Speech in Congress)
Nullification (Fourth of July Oration, 1831)
SARAH FLOWER ADAMS -- 1805-1848
He Sendeth Sun, He Sendeth Shower
Nearer, My God, to Thee
JOSEPH ADDISON (by Hamilton Wright Mabie) -- 1672-1720
Sir Roger de Coverley at the Play
Visit to Sir Roger de Coverley
Vanity of Human Life
Essay on Fans
Hymn, 'The Spacious Firmament'
AELIANUS CLAUDIUS -- Second Century
Of Certain Notable Men that made themselves
Playfellowes with Children
Of a Certaine Sicilian whose Eyesight was Woonderfull
Sharpe and Quick
The Lawe of the Lacedaemonians against Covetousness
That Sleep is the Brother of Death, and of Gorgias drawing
to his End
Of the Voluntary and Willing Death of Calanus
Of Delicate Dinners, Sumptuous Suppers, and Prodigall
Banqueting
Of Bestowing Time, and how Walking Up and Downe was
not Allowable among the Lacedaemonians
How Socrates Suppressed the Pryde and Hautinesse of
Alcibiades
Of Certaine Wastgoodes and Spendthriftes
AESCHINES -- B.C. 389-314
A Defense and an Attack ('Oration against Ctesiphon')
AESCHYLUS (by John Williams White) -- B.C. 525-456
Complaint of Prometheus ('Prometheus')
Prayer to Artemis ('The Suppliants')
Defiance of Eteocles ('The Seven against Thebes')
Vision of Cassandra ('Agamemnon')
Lament of the Old Nurse ('The Libation-Pourers')
Decree of Athena ('The Eumenides')
AESOP (by Harry Thurston Peck) -- Seventh Century B.C.
The Fox and the Lion
The Ass in the Lion's Skin
The Ass Eating Thistles
The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing
The Countryman and the Snake
The Belly and the Members
The Satyr and the Traveler
The Lion and the other Beasts
The Ass and the Little Dog
The Country Mouse and the City Mouse
The Dog and the WolfJEAN LOUIS RODOLPHE AGASSIZ -- 1807-1873
The Silurian Beach ('Geological Sketches')
Voices ('Methods of Study in Natural History')
Formation of Coral Reefs (same)
AGATHIAS -- A.D. 536-581
Apostrophe to Plutarch
GRACE AGUILAR -- 1816-1847
Greatness of Friendship ('Woman's Friendship')
Order of Knighthood ('The Days of Bruce')
Culprit and Judge ('Home Influence')
WILLIAM HARRISON AINSWORTH -- 1805-1882
Students of Paris ('Crichton')
MARK AKENSIDE -- 1721-1770
From the Epistle to Curio
Aspirations after the Infinite ('Pleasures of the Imagination')
On a Sermon against Glory
PEDRO ANTONIO DE ALARCÓN -- 1833-1891
A Woman Viewed from Without ('The Three-Cornered Hat')
How the Orphan Manuel gained his Sobriquet ('The Child
of the Ball')
ALCAEUS -- Sixth Century B.C.
The Palace
A Banquet Song
An Invitation
The Storm
The Poor Fisherman
The State
Poverty
BALTÁZAR DE ALCÁZAR -- 1530?-1606
Sleep
The Jovial Supper
ALCIPHRON (by Harry Thurston Peck) -- Second Century
From a Mercenary Girl--Petala to Simalion
Pleasures of Athens--Euthydicus to Epiphanio
From an Anxious Mother--Phyllis to Thrasonides
From a Curious Youth--Philocomus to Thestylus
From a Professional Diner-out--Capnosphrantes to
Aristomachus
Unlucky Luck--Chytrolictes to Patellocharon
ALCMAN -- Seventh Century B.C.
Poem on Night
LOUISA MAY ALCOTT -- 1832-1888
The Night Ward ('Hospital Sketches')
Amy's Valley of Humiliation ('Little Women')
Thoreau's Flute (Atlantic Monthly)
Song from the Suds ('Little Women')
ALCUIN (by William H. Carpenter) -- 735?-8o4On the Saints of the Church at York ('Alcuin and the Rise
of the Christian Schools')
Disputation between Pepin, the Most Noble and Royal
Youth, and Albinus the Scholastic
A Letter from Alcuin to Charlemagne
HENRY M. ALDEN -- 1836-
A Dedication--To My Beloved Wife ('A Study of Death')
The Dove and the Serpent (same)
Death and Sleep (same)
The Parable of the Prodigal (same)
THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH -- 1837-
Destiny
Identity
Prescience
Alec Yeaton's Son
Memory
Tennyson (1890)
Sweetheart, Sigh No More
Broken Music
Elmwood
Sea Longings
A Shadow of the Night
Outward Bound
Reminiscence
Père Antoine's Date-Palm
Miss Mehetabel's Son
ALEARDO ALEARDI -- 1812-1878
Cowards ('The Primal Histories')
The Harvesters ('Monte Circello')
The Death of the Year ('An Hour of My Youth')
JEAN LE ROND D'ALEMBERT -- 1717-1783
Montesquieu (Eulogy in the 'Encyclopédie')
VITTORIO ALFIERI (by L. Oscar Kuhns) -- 1749-1803
Scenes from 'Agamemnon'
ALFONSO THE WISE -- 1221-1284
What Meaneth a Tyrant, and How he Useth his Power
('Las Siete Partidas')
On the Turks, and Why they are So Called ('La Gran
Conquista de Ultramar')
To the Month of Mary ('Cantigas')
ALFRED THE GREAT -- 849-901
King Alfred on King-Craft
Alfred's Preface to the Version of Pope Gregory's 'Pastoral
Care'
From Boethius
Blossom Gatherings from St. Augustine
CHARLES GRANT ALLEN -- 1848-
The Coloration of Flowers ('The Colors of Flowers')
Among the Heather ('The Evolutionist at Large')The Heron's Haunt ('Vignettes from Nature')
JAMES LANE ALLEN -- 1850-
A Courtship ('A Summer in Arcady')
Old King Solomon's Coronation ('Flute and Violin')
WILLIAM ALLINGHAM -- 1828-1889
The Ruined Chapel
The Winter Pear
O Spirit of the Summer-time
The Bubble
St. Margaret's Eve
The Fairies
Robin Redbreast
An Evening
Daffodil
Lovely Mary Donnelly
KARL JONAS LUDVIG ALMQUIST -- 1793-1866
Characteristics of Cattle
A New Undine (from 'The Book of the Rose')
God's War
JOHANNA AMBROSIUS -- 1854-
A Peasant's Thoughts
Struggle and Peace
Do Thou Love, Too!
Invitation
EDMONDO DE AMICIS -- 1846-
The Light ('Constantinople')
Resemblances (same)
Birds (same)
Cordova ('Spain')
The Land of Pluck ('Holland and Its People')
The Dutch Masters ('Holland and Its People')
HENRI FRÉDÉRIC AMIEL (by Richard Burton) -- 1821-1881
Extracts from Amiel's Journal:
Christ's Real Message
Duty
Joubert
Greeks vs. Moderns
Nature, and Teutonic and Scandinavian Poetry
Training of Children
Mozart and Beethoven
FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS

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