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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Library Of The World's Best Literature,
Ancient And Modern, Vol 4, by Charles Dudley Warner
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
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Title: Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 4
Author: Charles Dudley Warner
Release Date: August 19, 2004 [EBook #13220]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BEST LITERATURE, VOL. 4 ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Charlie Kirschner and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team.
LIBRARY OF THE
WORLD'S BEST LITERATURE
ANCIENT AND MODERN
CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER
EDITOR
HAMILTON WRIGHT MABIE
LUCIA GILBERT RUNKLE
GEORGE HENRY WARNER
ASSOCIATE EDITORSConnoisseur Edition
VOL. IV.
1896
THE ADVISORY COUNCIL
CRAWFORD H. TOY, A.M., LL.D.,
Professor of Hebrew,
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass.
THOMAS R. LOUNSBURY, LL.D., L.H.D.,
Professor of English in the Sheffield Scientific School of
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn.
WILLIAM M. SLOANE, PH.D., L.H.D.,
Professor of History and Political Science,
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N.J.
BRANDER MATTHEWS, A.M., LL.B.,
Professor of Literature,
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City.
JAMES B. ANGELL, LL.D.,
President of the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, Mich.
WILLARD FISKE, A.M., PH.D.,
Late Professor of the Germanic and Scandinavian
Languages and Literatures,
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, N.Y.
EDWARD S. HOLDEN, A.M., LL.D.,
Director of the Lick Observatory, and Astronomer
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, Cal.
ALCÉE FORTIER, LIT.D.,
Professor of the Romance Languages,
TULANE UNIVERSITY, New Orleans, La.
WILLIAM P. TRENT, M.A.,
Dean of the Department of Arts and Sciences, and
Professor of English and History,UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH, Sewanee, Tenn.
PAUL SHOREY, PH.D.,
Professor of Greek and Latin Literature,
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago, Ill.
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, LL.D.,
United States Commissioner of Education,
BUREAU OF EDUCATION, Washington, D.C.
MAURICE FRANCIS EGAN, A.M., LL.D.,
Professor of Literature in the
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington,
D.C.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOL. IV.
GEORGE BANCROFT--Continued: -- 1800-1891
Wolfe on the Plains of Abraham ('History of the United
States')
Lexington (same)
Washington (same)
JOHN AND MICHAEL BANIM -- 1798-1874
The Publican's Dream ('The Bit of Writin'')
Ailleen
Soggarth Aroon
Irish Maiden's Song
THÉODORE DE BANVILLE -- 1823--1891
Le Café ('The Soul of Paris')
The Mysterious Hosts of the Forests ('The Caryatids':
Lang's Translation)
Aux Enfants Perdus: Lang's Translation
Ballade des Pendus: Lang's Translation
ANNA LÆITIA BARBAULD -- 1743-1825
Against Inconsistency in Our Expectations
A Dialogue of the Dead
Life
Praise to God
ALEXANDER BARCLAY -- 1475-1552
The Courtier's Life (Second Eclogue)
RICHARD HARRIS BARHAM -- 1788-1845As I Laye A-Thynkynge
The Lay of St. Cuthbert
A Lay of St. Nicholas
SABINE BARING-GOULD -- 1834-
St. Patrick's Purgatory ('Curious Myths of the Middle Ages')
The Cornish Wreckers ('The Vicar of Morwenstow')
JANE BARLOW -- 18--
Widow Joyce's Cloak ('Strangers at Lisconnel')
Walled Out ('Bogland Studies')
JOEL BARLOW -- 1754-1812
A Feast ('Hasty Pudding')
WILLIAM BARNES -- 1800-1886
Blackmwore Maidens
May
Milken Time
Jessie Lee
The Turnstile
To the Water-Crowfoot
Zummer an' Winter
JAMES MATTHEW BARRIE -- 1860-
The Courtin' of T'nowhead's Bell ('Auld Licht Idylls')
Jess Left Alone ('A Window in Thrums')
After the Sermon ('The Little Minister')
The Mutual Discovery (same)
Lost Illusions ('Sentimental Tommy')
Sins of Circumstance (same)
FRÉDÉRIC BASTIAT -- 1801-1850
Petition of Manufacturers of Artificial Light
Stulta and Puera
Inapplicable Terms ('Economic Sophisms')
CHARLES BAUDELAIRE (by Grace King) -- 1821-1867
Meditation
Death of the Poor
Music
The Broken Bell
The Enemy
Beauty
Death
The Painter of Modern Life ('L'Art Romantique')
Modernness
From 'Little Poems in Prose': Every One His Own Chimera;
Humanity; Windows; Drink
From a Journal
LORD BEACONSFIELD (by Isa Carrington Cabell) -- 1804-
1881
A Day at Ems ('Vivian Grey')
The Festa in the Alhambra ('The Young Duke')
Squibs from 'The Young Duke': Charles Annesley; The
Fussy Hostess; Public Speaking; Female BeautyLothair in Palestine ('Lothair')
BEAUMARCHAIS -- 1732-1799
Outwitting a Guardian ('The Barber of Seville')
Outwitting a Husband ('The Marriage of Figaro')
FRANCIS BEAUMONT AND JOHN FLETCHER -- 1584-1625
The Faithful Shepherdess
Song
Song
Aspatia's Song
Leandro's Song
True Beauty
Ode to Melancholy
To Ben Jonson, on His 'Fox'
On the Tombs in Westminster
Arethusa's Declaration ('Philaster')
The Story of Bellario (same)
Evadne's Confession ('The Maid's Tragedy')
Death of the Boy Hengo ('Bonduca')
From 'The Two Noble Kinsmen'
WILLIAM BECKFORD -- 1759-1844
The Incantation and the Sacrifice ('Vathek')
Vathek and Nouronihar in the Halls of Eblis (same)
HENRY WARD BEECHER -- 1813-1887
Book-Stores and Books ('Star Papers')
Selected Paragraphs
Sermon: Poverty and the Gospel
A New England Sunday ('Norwood')
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (by Irenæus Stevenson) -- 1770-
1827
Letters: To Dr. Wegeler ; To the Same; To Bettina
Brentano;
To Countess Giulietta Guicciardi ; To the Same; To His
Brothers;
To the Royal and Imperial High Court of Appeal ; To
Baroness von Drossdick;
To Zmeskall ; To the Same; To His Brother Johann; To
Stephan v. Breuning
CARL MICHAEL BELLMAN (by Olga Flinch) -- 1740-1795
To Ulla
Cradle-Song for My Son Carl
Amaryllis
Art and Politics
Drink Out Thy Glass
JEREMY BENTHAM -- 1748-1832
Of the Principle of Utility ('An Introduction to the Principles
of Morals snd Legislation')
Reminiscences of Childhood
Letter to George Wilson (1781)
Fragment of a Letter to Lord Lansdowne (1790)JEAN-PIERRE DE BÉRANGER (by Alcée Fortier) -- 1780-
1857
From 'The Gipsies'
The Gad-Fly
Draw It Mild
The King of Yvetot
Fortune
The People's Reminiscences
The Old Tramp
Fifty Years
The Garret
My Tomb
From His Preface to His Collected Poems
GEORGE BERKELEY -- 1685-1753
On the Prospect of Planting Arts and Learning in America
Essay on Tar-Water ('Siris')
HECTOR BERLIOZ -- 1803-1869
The Italian Race as Musicians and Auditors
('Autobiography')
The Famous "K Snuff-Box Treachery" (same)
On Gluck (same)
On Bach (same)
Music as an Aristocratic Art (same)
Beginning of a "Grand Passion" (same)
On Theatrical Managers in Relation to Art
SAINT BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX -- 1091-1153
Saint Bernard's Hymn
Monastic Luxury (Apology to the Abbot William of St.
Thierry)
From His Sermon on the Death of Gerard
BERNARD OF CLUNY (by William C. Prime) -- Twelfth
Century
Brief Life Is Here Our Portion
JULIANA BERNERS -- Fifteenth Century
The Treatyse of Fyssbynge with an Angle
WALTER BESANT -- 1838-
Old-Time London ('London')
The Synagogue ('The Rebel Queen')
BESTIARIES AND LAPIDARIES (by L. Oscar Kuhns)
The Lion
The Pelican
The Eagle
The Phoenix
The Ant
The Siren
The Whale
The Crocodile
The Turtle-Dove
The Mandragora
SapphireCoral
MARIE-HENRI BEYLE (Stendhal) (by Frederic Taber Cooper) -
- 1783-1842
Princess Sanseverina's Interview ('Chartreuse de Parme')
Clélia Aids Fabrice to Escape (same)
WlLLEM BlLDERDIJK -- 1756-1831
Ode to Beauty
From the 'Ode to Napoleon'
Slighted Love
The Village Schoolmaster ('Country Life')
BION -- Second Century B.C.
Threnody
Hesper
AUGUSTINE BIRRELL -- 1850-
Dr. Johnson ('Obiter Dicta')
The Office of Literature (same)
Truth-Hunting (same)
Benvenuto Cellini (same)
On the Alleged Obscurity of Mr. Browning's Poetry (same)
FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS
VOLUME IV.
Egyptian Hieroglyphics (Colored Plate) Frontispiece
"The Irish Maiden's Song" (Photogravure) 1473
"Milking Time" (Photogravure) 1567
"Music" (Photogravure) 1625
Henry Ward Beecher (Portrait) 1714
"Beethoven" (Photogravure) 1750
Jean-Pierre de Béranger (Portrait) 1784
"Monastic Luxury" (Photogravure) 1824
VIGNETTE PORTRAITS
John Banim
Théodore de Banville
Anna Lætitia Barbauld
Richard Harris Barham
Jane Barlow
Joel Barlow
James Matthew BarrieFrédéric Bastiat
Charles Baudelaire
Lord Beaconsfield
Beaumarchais
Francis Beaumont
William Beckford
Ludwig van Beethoven
Jeremy Bentham
George Berkeley
Hector Berlioz
Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
Juliana Berners
Walter Besant
Henri Beyle (Stendhal)
Augustine Birrell
GEORGE BANCROFT (Continued from Volume
III)
WOLFE ON THE PLAINS OF ABRAHAM
From 'History of the United States'
But, in the meantime, Wolfe applied himself intently to reconnoitering the north
shore above Quebec. Nature had given him good eyes, as well as a warmth of
temper to follow first impressions. He himself discovered the cove which now
bears his name, where the bending promontories almost form a basin, with a
very narrow margin, over which the hill rises precipitously. He saw the path that
wound up the steep, though so narrow that two men could hardly march in it
abreast; and he knew, by the number of tents which he counted on the summit,
that the Canadian post which guarded it could not exceed a hundred. Here he
resolved to land his army by surprise. To mislead the enemy, his troops were
kept far above the town; while Saunders, as if an attack was intended at
Beauport, set Cook, the great mariner, with others, to sound the water and plant
buoys along that shore.
The day and night of the twelfth were employed in preparations. The autumn
evening was bright; and the general, under the clear starlight, visited his
stations, to make his final inspection and utter his last words of encouragement.
As he passed from ship to ship, he spoke to those in the boat with him of the
poet Gray, and the 'Elegy in a Country Churchyard.' "I," said he, "would prefer
being the author of that poem to the glory of beating the French to-morrow;"
and, while the oars struck the river as it rippled in the silence of the night air
under the flowing tide, he repeated:--
"The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power,
And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,
Await alike the inevitable hour--
The paths of glory lead but to the grave."
Every officer knew his appointed duty, when, at one o'clock in the morning ofthe thirteenth of September, Wolfe, Monckton, and Murray, and about half the
forces, set off in boats, and, using neither sail nor oars, glided down with the
tide. In three quarters of an hour the ships followed; and, though the night had
become dark, aided by the rapid current, they reached the cove just in time to
cover the landing. Wolfe and the troops with him leaped on shore; the light
infantry, who found themselves borne by the current a little below the
intrenched path, clambered up the steep hill, staying themselves by the roots
and boughs of the maple and spruce and ash trees that covered the precipitous
declivity, and, after a little firing, dispersed the picket which guarded the height;
the rest ascended safely by the pathway. A battery of four guns on the left was
abandoned to Colonel Howe. When Townshend's division disembarked, the
English had already gained one of the roads to Quebec; and, advancing in front
of the forest, Wolfe stood at daybreak with his invincible battalions on the
Plains of Abraham, the battle-field of the Celtic and Saxon races.
"It can be but a small party, come to burn a few houses and retire," said
Montcalm, in amazement as the news reached him in his intrenchments the
other side of the St. Charles; but, obtaining better information, "Then," he cried,
"they have at last got to the weak side of this miserable garrison; we must give
battle and crush them before mid-day." And, before ten, the two armies, equal in
numbers, each being composed of less than five thousand men, were ranged in
presence of one another for battle. The English, not easily accessible from
intervening shallow ravines and rail fences, were all regulars, perfect in
discipline, terrible in their fearless enthusiasm, thrilling with pride at their
morning's success, commanded by a man whom they obeyed with confidence
and love. The doomed and devoted Montcalm had what Wolfe had called but
"five weak French battalions," of less than two thousand men, "mingled with
disorderly peasantry," formed on commanding ground. The French had three
little pieces of artillery; the English, one or two. The two armies cannonaded
each other for nearly an hour; when Montcalm, having summoned De
Bougainville to his aid, and dispatched messenger after messenger for De
Vaudreuil, who had fifteen hundred men at the camp, to come up before he
should be driven from the ground, endeavored to flank the British and crowd
them down the high bank of the river. Wolfe counteracted the movement by
detaching Townshend with Amherst's regiment, and afterward a part of the
Royal Americans, who formed on the left with a double front.
Waiting no longer for more troops, Montcalm led the French army impetuously
to the attack. The ill-disciplined companies broke by their precipitation and the
unevenness of the ground; and fired by platoons, without unity. Their
adversaries, especially the Forty-third and the Forty-seventh, where Monckton
stood, of which three men out of four were Americans, received the shock with
calmness; and after having, at Wolfe's command, reserved their fire till their
enemy was within forty yards, their line began a regular, rapid, and exact
discharge of musketry. Montcalm was present everywhere, braving danger,
wounded, but cheering by his example. The second in command, De
Sennezergues, an associate in glory at Ticonderoga, was killed. The brave but
untried Canadians, flinching from a hot fire in the open field, began to waver;
and, so soon as Wolfe, placing himself at the head of the Twenty-eighth and the
Louisburg grenadiers, charged with bayonets, they everywhere gave way. Of
the English officers, Carleton was wounded; Barré, who fought near Wolfe,
received in the head a ball which made him blind of one eye, and ultimately of
both. Wolfe, also, as he led the charge, was wounded in the wrist; but still
pressing forward, he received a second ball; and having decided the day, was
struck a third time, and mortally, in the breast. "Support me," he cried to an
officer near him; "let not my brave fellows see me drop." He was carried to the
rear, and they brought him water to quench his thirst. "They run! they run!"spoke the officer on whom he leaned. "Who run?" asked Wolfe, as his life was
fast ebbing. "The French," replied the officer, "give way everywhere." "What,"
cried the expiring hero, "do they run already? Go, one of you, to Colonel Burton;
bid him march Webb's regiment with all speed to Charles River to cut off the
fugitives." Four days before, he had looked forward to early death with dismay.
"Now, God be praised, I die happy." These were his words as his spirit
escaped in the blaze of his glory. Night, silence, the rushing tide, veteran
discipline, the sure inspiration of genius, had been his allies; his battle-field,
high over the ocean river, was the grandest theatre for illustrious deeds; his
victory, one of the most momentous in the annals of mankind, gave to the
English tongue and the institutions of the Germanic race the unexplored and
seemingly infinite West and South. He crowded into a few hours actions that
would have given lustre to length of life; and, filling his day with greatness,
completed it before its noon.
D. Appleton and Company, New York.
LEXINGTON
From 'History of the United States'
Day came in all the beauty of an early spring. The trees were budding; the
grass growing rankly a full month before its time; the bluebird and the robin
gladdening the genial season, and calling forth the beams of the sun which on
that morning shone with the warmth of summer; but distress and horror
gathered over the inhabitants of the peaceful town. There on the green lay in
death the gray-haired and the young; the grassy field was red "with the
innocent blood of their brethren slain," crying unto God for vengeance from the
ground.
Seven of the men of Lexington were killed, nine wounded; a quarter part of all
who stood in arms on the green. These are the village heroes, who were more
than of noble blood, proving by their spirit that they were of a race divine. They
gave their lives in testimony to the rights of mankind, bequeathing to their
country an assurance of success in the mighty struggle which they began. Their
names are held in grateful remembrance, and the expanding millions of their
countrymen renew and multiply their praise from generation to generation. They
fulfilled their duty not from the accidental impulse of the moment; their action
was the slowly ripened fruit of Providence and of time. The light that led them
on was combined of rays from the whole history of the race; from the traditions
of the Hebrews in the gray of the world's morning; from the heroes and sages of
republican Greece and Rome; from the example of Him who died on the cross
for the life of humanity; from the religious creed which proclaimed the divine
presence in man, and on this truth, as in a life-boat, floated the liberties of
nations over the dark flood of the Middle Ages; from the customs of the
Germans transmitted out of their forests to the councils of Saxon England; from
the burning faith and courage of Martin Luther; from trust in the inevitable
universality of God's sovereignty as taught by Paul of Tarsus and Augustine,
through Calvin and the divines of New England; from the avenging fierceness
of the Puritans, who dashed the mitre on the ruins of the throne; from the bold
dissent and creative self-assertion of the earliest emigrants to Massachusetts;
from the statesmen who made, and the philosophers who expounded, the
revolution of England; from the liberal spirit and analyzing inquisitiveness of the
eighteenth century; from the cloud of witnesses of all the ages to the reality and
the rightfulness of human freedom. All the centuries bowed themselves from the

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