La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 26, July 1880.

De
156 pages
! "# $ % &''() % % %* * ! * + ), ! % % + * % - ! * ***) ) . ! "# $ % &''() / . 0 1 . 2 % "3 "(&( 4 53&3#67 . 8 . 9 :-''6;-& ? 0 ::@ 9 9?8: / /A9? $> , &''( -- : $ ! " 2 - ! * + ,*- . / ! ! # % ! :#- % ! $ A 0B : + + - - ! + + ! - : # 05 6 5 3 3 ( ' ) * " ' % * ; ! - ' : )- +* : - ! : : . / $ - . 8 -; = ? ! - & ' " ) ' ) 2 " " + 9 : . / - ( ;" ; ! . / ! : ! D8 : :D ! - , !
Voir plus Voir moins
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 26, July 1880., by Various
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 26, July 1880.
Author: Various
Release Date: February 23, 2010 [EBook #31365]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LIPPINCOTT'S MAGAZINE, JULY 1880 ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Josephine Paolucci and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net.
LIPPINCOTT'S MAGAZINE
OF
POPULAR LITERATURE AND SCIENCE.
VOLUME XXVI.
PHILADELPHIA: J.B. LIPPINCOTT AND CO.
1880.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1880, by
Americans Abroad
A Forgotten American Worthy
Ouida
42, 147, 290, 411, 547, 666
68
Prof. T. F. Crane
Rose G. Kingsley
Dr. H. C. Wood
PAGE
A. H. Siegfried
Louise Seymour Houghton
466
171, 279
627, 755
163
438
308
A Villeggiatura in Asisi
Alain Gore
Charles Burr Todd
Lucy H. Hooper
A Pivotal Point
Author of "Dorothy Fox"
A Chapter of American Exploration. (Illustrated.)
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
Bauble Wishart
J.B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.,
CONTENTS.
[Pg 3]
William H. Rideing
Automatism
An Old English Home: Bramshill House
Will O. Bates
137
507
484
Author of "Signor Monaldini's Niece"
William M. Baker
An Open Look at the Political Situation
Glimpses of Portugal and the Portuguese. (Illustrated.)
George J. Varney
Findelkind of Martinswand: A Child's Story
A Great Singer
A Graveyard Idyl
American Aëronauts. (Illustrated.)
An Historical Rocky-Mountain Outpost. (Illustrated.)
Frederick A. Ober.
Dungeness, General Greene's Sea-Island Plantation
LIPPINCOTT'S PRESS, Philadelphia.
719
473
734
747
649
118
Gas-Burning, and its Consequences
559
Author of "Flitters, Tatters and the Counsellor"
Henry A. Beers
241
265
An Episode of Spanish Chivalry
Canoeing on the High Mississippi. (Illustrated.)
Ekoniah Scrub: Among Florida Lakes. (Illustrated.)
Adam and Eve
George Rex Buckman
393
L. Lejeune
M. B. C. True
Olive Logan
Jennie J. Young
Amelia E. Barr
Frances Pierrepont North
Prof. James D. Butler
 IV. Jack
The Arts of India. (Illustrated.)
The Authors of "Froufrou"
Louise Coffin Jones
Helen Campbell
On the Skunk River
Limoges, and its Porcelain
Our Grandfathers' Temples. (Illustrated.)
Seven Weeks a Missionary
Charles F. Richardson
369
586
698
198
567
532
711
9
Margaret Bertha Wright
"Kitty"
How she Kept her Vow: A Narrative of Facts
Paradise Plantation. (Illustrated.)
Frederic G. Mather
Horse-Racing in France. (Illustrated.)
On Spelling Reform
The Early Days of Mormonism
The Palace of the Leatherstonepaughs. (Illustrated.)
[Pg 4]
Pipistrello
Short Studies in the Picturesque William Sloan Kennedy
Louise Seymour Houghton
TheRuinsoftheColoradoValley.
Studies in the Slums—
The Ruin of Me. (Told by a Young Married Man.)
The Price of Safety
William H. Rideing
Margaret Bertha Wright
Mary Dean
E. W. Latimer
J. Brander Matthews
 III. Nan; or, A Girl's Life
The Mistakes of Two People
Heinrich Heine
498
742
213
678
375
103
362
321, 452
594
503
424
84
351
111
56
19
576
613
189
181
336
Louise Coffin Jones
National Music an Interpreter of National Character
M. H. Catherwood
S. G. W. Benjamin
A. Parker
Lawrence Buckley
604
Ouida
Newport a Hundred Years Ago
TheΑπαξΑεγομεν αin Shakespeare
 V. Diet and its Doings
Mrs. Marcellus. By a Guest at her Saturdays
 VI. Jan of the North
Mallston's Youngest
Mrs. Pinckney's Governess
The Practical History of a Play
George L. Catlin
Wikoff, Henry—The Reminiscences of an Idler
Walford, L. B.—Troublesome Daughters
Laffan, May—Christy Carew
29
690
218
232
521
The American Art Review, Nos. 8 and 9
Scoones, W. Baptiste—Four Centuries of English Letters
Stephen, Leslie—Alexander Pope. (English Men-of-Letters Series.)
Nichol, John—Byron. (English Men-of-Letters Series.)
389
519
520
775
51 9
135
263
518
Piatt, John James—Pencilled Fly-Leaves: A Book of Essays in Town and 648 Country
645
647
Where Lightning Strikes
Arr, E. H.—New England Bygones
L'Art: revue hebdomadaíre illustrée. Sixième année, Tome II
TheRuinsoftheColoradoValley. (Illustrated.)
Through the Yellowstone Park to Fort Custer
Smith, Goldwin—William Cowper. (English Men-of-Letters Series.)
 " " —Studies in German Literature
George J. Varney
775
LITERATUREOFTHEDAY, comprising Reviews of the following Works:
261
Auerbach, Berthold—Brigitta
Green, John Richard—History of the English People
391
Mahaffy, M. A., Rev. J. P.—A History of Classical Greek Literature
Symington, Andrew James—Samuel Lover: A Biographical Sketch. With Selections from his Writings and Correspondence
Black, William—White Wings: A Yachting Romance
Forrester, Mrs.—Roy and Viola
Fothergill, Jessie—The Wellfields
Alice Ilgenfritz
Ayres, Anne—The Life and Work of William Augustus Muhlenberg
Mrs. Beauchamp Brown
Alfred Terry Bacon
S. Weir Mitchell, M. D.
Westbrook
517
77 4
133
A Child's Autobiography, 770; A Legion of Devils, 2 57; A Little Ireland in America, 767; A Natural Barometer, 517; An Unfinished Page of History, 764; A Plot for an Historical Novel, 385; A Sermon to Lite rary Aspirants, 637; Civil-Service Reform and Democratic Ideas, 762; Concernin g Night-Noises, 253; Condition of the People in the West of Ireland, 514 ; Conservatory Life in
775
775
135
775
392
Taylor, Bayard—Critical Essays and Literary Notes
Will Democracy Tolerate a Permanent Class of National Office-holders?
OURMONTHLYGOSSIP, comprising the following Articles:
JULY, 1880.
Boston, 511; Edelweiss,126; Fate of an Old Companion of Napoleon III., 516; High Jinks on the Upper Mississippi, 515; Our New V isitors, 388; People's Houses: A Dialogue, 640; Prayer-Meeting Eloquence,129; Seeing is Believing, 642; Spoiled Children,128; Tabarin, the French Merry-Andrew, 255; The Demidoffs, 259; The Jardin d'Acclimatation of P aris,130; The Miseries of Camping Out, 387; The Paris Salon of 1880, 381; "Ti me Turns the Tables," 642; Unreformed Spelling, 388; Wanted—A Real Gainsborough, 772; "Western Memorabilia," 250.
Three Roses
Philip Bourke Marston
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1 880, by J.B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
465
109
Horatio Nelson Powers367
665
211
Julia C. R. Dorr
Edgar Fawcett
POETRY:
Shelley
Dora Reed Goodale
OF
From Far
My Treasure
Lost
Teresa di Faenza
The King's Gifts
Delectatio Piscatoria. The Upper Kennebec
Dawn
[Pg 9]
83
18
718
585
502
The Home of the Gentians
Howard Glyndon
Emily A. Braddock
H. L. Leonard
Mary B. Dodge
John B. Tabb
612
162
350
LIPPINCOTT'SMAGAZINE
Eliza Calvert Hall
240
THE PALACE OF THE LEATHERSTONEPAUGHS.
POPULAR LITERATURE AND SCIENCE.
A Vengeance
J. B. Tabb
G. A. Davis
Emma Lazarus
The Sea's Secret
Possession
Under the Grasses
RUINS OF THE PALACES OF THE CÆSARS.
Every sentimental traveller to Rome must sometimes wonder if to come to the Eternal City is not, after all, more of a loss than a gain: Rome unvisited holds such a solitary place in one's imaginings. It is th en a place around which sweeps a different atmosphere from that of any other city under the sun. One sees it through poetic mists that veil every prosai c reality. It is arched by an horizon against which the figures of its wonderful history are shadowed with scarcely less of grandeur and glory than those the old gods cast upon the Sacred Hill.
One who has never seen Rome is thus led to imagine that those of his country-people who have lived here for years have become in a manner purged of all natural commonplaceness. One thinks of them as refi ned—sublimated, so to speak—into beings worthy of reverence and to be spo ken of with awed admiration. For have not their feet wandered where the Caesars' feet have trod, till that famous ground has become common earth to them? Have they not dwelt in the shadow of mountains that have trembled beneath the tramp of Goth, Visigoth and Ostrogoth, till those shadows ha ve become every-day shadows to them? Have they not often watched beneath the same stars that shone upon knightly vigils, till the whiteness of those shining hosts has made pure their souls as it purified the heroic ones of old? Have they not listened to the singing and sighing of the selfsame winds that sung and sighed about the spot where kingly Numa wooed a nymph, till it must be that into the commoner natures has entered some of the sweetness and wisdo m of that half-divine communion?
Thus the dreamer comes to Rome expecting to enter and become enfolded by those poetic mists, to live an ideal life amid the tender melancholy that broods over stately and storied ruin, and to forget for ev ermore, while within the wondrous precincts, that aught more prosaic exists than the heroes of history, the fairest visions of art and dreams of poesy.
[Pg 10]
"GHOSTS OF FLEAS" (Copied From Sketches Of William Blake).
So came the Leatherstonepaughs. And so have the Lea therstonepaughs sometimes wondered if, after all, to come to Rome is not more of a loss than a gain in the dimming of one of their fairest ideals. For is there another city in the world where certain of the vulgar verities of life press themselves more prominently into view than in the Eternal City? Can one anywhere have a more forcible conviction that greasy cookery is bile-provoking, and that it is because the sylvan bovine ruminates so long upon the melanc holy Campagna that one's dinners become such a heavy and sorrowful matter in Rome? Is there any city in the universe where fleas dwarf more col ossally and fiendishly Blake's famous "ghosts" of their kind? Does one any where come oftener in from wet streets, "a dem'd moist, unpleasant body," to more tomblike rooms? Is one anywhere so ceaselessly haunted by the disagreeable consciousness that one pays ten times as much for everything one buys as a native pays, and that the trousered descendant of the toga'd Roman regards the Western barbarian as quite as much his legitimate prey as the barbari an's barelegged ancestors were the prey of his forefathers before the tables of history were turned, Rome fallen and breeches supplied to all the world? And are any mortal vistas more gorgeously illuminated by the red guidebook of the Tourist than are the stately and storied ruins where the sentimentalist seeketh the brooding of a tender melancholy, and findeth it not in the presence of c ouriers, cabmen, beggars, photograph-peddlers, stovepipe hats, tie-backs and bridal giggles?
The dreamer thought to find old Rome crystallized amid its glorious memories. He finds a nineteenth-century city, with gay shops and fashionable streets, living over the heroic scenes of the ancients and the actual woe and spiritual mysticism of the mediæval age; and he is disappointed—nay, even sometimes enraged into a gnashing of the teeth at all things Roman.
But after many weeks, after the sights have been "d one," the mouldy and mossy nooks of the old city explored, and the marvellous picturesqueness that hides in strange places revealed—after one has a speaking acquaintance with all the broken bits of old statues that gather moth and rust where the tourist cometh not and the guidebook is not known, and has followed the tiniest thread of legend or tradition into all manner of mysteriou s regions,—then the sentimentalist begins to love Rome again—Rome as it is, not Rome as it seemed through the glamours of individual imagination.
This is what the Leatherstonepaughs did. But first they fled the companionship of the beloved but somewhat loudly-shrieking American eagle as that proud bird often appears in the hotels andpensionsof Europe, and lived in a shabby
[Pg 11]
birdoftenappearsinthehotelsandpensionsofEurope,andlivedinashabby Roman palace, where only the soft bastard Latin was heard upon the stairs, and where, if any mediæval ghost stalked in rusted armor or glided in mouldering cerements, it would not understand a single word of their foreign, many-consonanted speech.
This palace stands, gay and grim, at the corner of a gay street and a dingy vicoloClaude Lorraine with a, the street and alley contrasting in color like a Nicholas Poussin. Past one side of the palace drifts all day a bright tide of foreign sightseers, prosperous Romans, gay models a nd flower-venders, handsome carriages, dark-eyed girls with their sall ow chaperones, and olive-cheeked, huge-checkedjeunesse dorée, evidently seeking for pretty faces as for pearls of great price, as is the manner of the jeunesse dorée of the Eternal City; while down upon the scene looks a succession of dwelling-houses, a gray-walled convent or two, one of the stateliest palaces of Rome—now let out in apartments and hiding in obscure rooms the last two impoverished descendants of a proud race that helped to impoverish Rome—one or two more prosperous palaces, and a venerable church, looking like a sleepy watchman of Zion suffering the enemy to do as it will before his closed eyes.
WHAT A ROMAN BUYS FOR TWO CENTS IN THE ETERNAL CITY.
WHAT A FOREIGNER BUYS FOR TWO CENTS IN THE ETERNAL CITY.
On the other side is the vicolo, dark of wall and d ank of pavement, with petticoats and shirts dangling from numerous window s and fluttering like gibbeted wretches in the air; with frowzy women sew ing or knitting in the sombre doorways and squalid urchins screaming every where; with humble vegetables and cheap wines exposed for sale in dirty windows; with usually a carriage or two undergoing a washing at some stable -door; and with almost always an amorous Romeo or two from some brighter r egion wandering hopefully to and fro amid the unpicturesque gloom of this Roman lane to catch a wafted kiss or a dropped letter from the rear window of his Juliet's home. For nowhere else in Europe, Asia, America, the Oceanic Archipelago or the Better
Land can the Romeo-and-Juliet business be more openly and freely carried on than in the by-streets of the Eternal City, where g irls are thought to be as jealously secluded from the monster Man as are the women of a Turkish seraglio or the nuns of a European convent. These Romeos and Juliets usually seem quite indifferent to the number of unsympathetic eyes that watch their little drama, providing only Papa and Mamma Capulet are ke pt in the dark in the shop below. Even the observation of Signor and Sign ora Montague would disturb them little, for it is only Juliet who is guarded, and Romeo is evidently expected to get all the fun out of life he can. In their dingy vicolo the Leatherstonepaughs have seen three Romeos watching three windows at the same twilight moment. One of them stood under an open window in the third story, from whence a line was dropped down to receive the letter he held in his hand. Just as the letter-weighted line was drawn up a window immediately below Juliet's was thrown violently open, and an unromantic head appeared to empty vials of wrath upon the spectacled Romeo belo w for always hanging about the windows of the sillypizzicarole girls above and giving the house a ridiculous appearance in the eyes of the passers-by . Romeo answered audaciously that the signora was mistaken in the man, that he had never been under that window before in his life, had never see n the Signorina Juliet, daughter of Capulet the pizzicarole who lived above , but that he was merely accompanying his friend Romeo, who loved Juliet the daughter of thedrochiere who lived a story below, and who was now wooing her softly two or three windows away. A shriek was his response as the wrathful head disappeared, while the lying Romeo laughed wickedly and the Leat herstonepaughs immoderately, in spite of themselves, to see Juliet, daughter of the drochiere, electrically abstracted fromheras if by the sudden application of a window four-hundred-enraged-mother-power to her lofty chignon from behind, while the three Romeos, evidently all strangers to each other, folded their tents like the Arab and silently stole away.
[Pg 12]
ROMEO.
JULIET.
The Leatherstonepaughs always suspected that no lordly race, from father's father to son's son, had ever dwelt in their immense palace. They suspected rather that it was, like many another mighty Roman pile, reared by plebeian gains to shelter noble Romans fair and proud whom F ate confined to economical "flats," and whose wounded pride could b est be poulticed by the wordpalazzo.
Hans Christian Andersen knew this palace well, and has described it as the early home of hisImprovisatore. In those days two fountains tinkled, one within, the other just outside, the dusky iron-barred basement. One fountain, however, has ceased to flow, and now if a passer-by peeps in at the grated window, whence issue hot strong vapors and bursts of merry laughter, he will see a huge stone basin into whose foaming contents one fo untain drips, and over which a dozen washerwomen bend and pound with all their might and main in a bit of chiaroscuro that reminds one of Correggio.
Over this Correggio glimpse wide stone stairs lead past dungeon-like doors up five flights to the skylighted roof. Each of these doors has a tiny opening through which gleams a watchful eye and comes the s ound of the inevitable "Chi è?e an armed" whenever the doorbell rings, as if each comer wer marauder strayed down from the Middle Ages, who must be well reconnoitred before the fortress-gates are unbarred.
[Pg 13]
THE COURT OF THE LEATHERSTONEPAUGHS' PALACE.
It was in theultimo pianothat the Leatherstonepaughs pitched their lodge in a vast wilderness of colorful tiled roofs, moss-grown and lichen-laden, amid a forest of quaintly-shaped and smokeless chimneys. T heir floors, guiltless of rugs or carpets, were of earthen tiles and worn into hollows where the feet of the palace-dwellers passed oftenest to and fro. A m ultitude of undraped windows opened like doors upon stone balconies, whither the inhabitants flew like a startled covey of birds every time the king and queen drove by in the street below, and upon which they passed always from room to room. The outer balcony looks down upon the Piazza Barberini and its famous Spouting Triton, with an horizon-line over the roofs broken by gloom y stone-pines and cypresses that seem to have grown from the buried g riefs of Rome's dead centuries. The inner balcony overlooks the court, w here through the wide windows of every story, amid the potted plants and climbing vines that never take on a shade of pallor in an Italian winter, and that adorn every Roman balcony, one could see into the penetralia of a doz en Roman families and wrest thence the most vital secrets—even to how muchRomanoAlfredo drank at dinner or whether lemon-juice or sour wine gave piquancy to Rosina's salad. Entirely unacquainted with these descendants of ancient patrician or pleb, the Leatherstonepaughs ventilated original and individu al theories concerning them, and gave them names of their own choosing.
"Rameses the Great has quarrelled with the Sphinx and is flirting with the Pyramid," whispered young Cain one day as some of the family, leaning over the iron railing, looked into the
[Pg 14]
Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin