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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Comedy of Errors, by William Shakespeare This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Comedy of Errors  The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.] Author: William Shakespeare Editor: William George Clark  John Glover Release Date: December 30, 2007 [EBook #23046] Language: English Character set encoding: UTF-8 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE COMEDY OF ERRORS ***
Produced by Louise Hope, Jonathan Ingram and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive/Canadian Libraries)
This text ofThe Comedy of Errorsis from Volume I of the nine-volume 1863 Cambridge edition of Shakespeare. The Preface (e-text 23041) and the other plays from this volume are each available as separate e-texts. General Notes are in their original location at the end of the play, followed by the text-critical notes originally printed at the bottom of each page. All notes are hyperlinked in both directions. In dialogue, a link from a speaker’s name generally means that the note applies to an entire line or group of lines. Line numbers—shown in the right margin and used for all notes—are from the original text. In prose passages the exact line counts will depend on your browser settings, and will probably be different from the displayed numbers. Stage directions were not included in the line numbering.
T H E W
O
OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
EDITED BY
WILLIAM GEORGE CLARK, M.A. FELLOW AND TUTOR OF TRINITY COLLEGE, AND PUBLIC ORATOR IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE;
ANDJOHN GLOVER, M.A. LIBRARIAN OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.
 VOLUME I.  
Cambridge and London: M A C M I 1863.
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Dramatis Personæ    Act IScene 1A hall in the Duke’s palace. Scene 2The Mart. Act IIScene 1The house of Antipholus of Ephesus. Scene 2A public place. Act IIIScene 1the house of Antipholus of Ephesus.Before Scene 2The same. Act IVScene 1A public place. Scene 2The house of Antipholus of Ephesus. Scene 3A public place. Scene 4A street. Act VScene 1A street before a Priory.  Endnotes Critical Apparatus(“Linenotes”) Texts Used(from general preface)
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THE COMEDY OF ERRORS.
1 DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
SOLINUS2, duke of Ephesus. ÆGEON, a merchant of Syracuse. AAHPITNITNLOHPSUSLUO 3esus Ephbrotwin,sa htreno sdns fo f Syracuse, Ætoongend ami Æ.ailo  DDOOMIOROMIRulespiohA tnt owSyra of s.a dna ,srehtorb he tons ntdaentt foE hpsesuwtniesuc, BALTHAZAR, a merchant. ANGELO, a goldsmith. First Merchant, friend to Antipholus of Syracuse. Second Merchant, to whom Angelo is a debtor. PINCH, a schoolmaster.  ÆMILIAwife to Ægeon, an abbess at Ephesus., ADRIANA, wife to Antipholus of Ephesus. LUCIANA, her sister. LUCE, servant to Adriana. A Courtezan.  Gaoler, Officers, and other Attendants. SCENE—Ephesus.
1.DRAMATISPERSONÆfirst given by Rowe. 2.SOLINUS] Seenote (I). 3.ANTIPHOLUS] Seenote (I).
THE COMEDY OF ERRORS.
ACT I. SCENEI.A hall in theDUKESpalace.
I. 1
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EnterDUKE, ÆGEON,Gaoler,Officers, and otherAttendants. Æge.Proceed, Solinus, to procure my fall, And by the doom of death end woes and all. Duke.Merchant of Syracusa, plead no more; I am not partial to infringe our laws: The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your duke To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen, Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives, Have seal’d his rigorous statutes with their bloods, Excludes all pity from our threatening looks. For, since the mortal and intestine jars ’Twixt thy seditious countrymen and us, It hath in solemn synods been decreed, Both by the Syracusians and ourselves, To admit no traffic to our adverse towns: Nay, more, If any born at Ephesus be seen At any Syracusian marts and fairs; Again: if any Syracusian born Come to the bay of Ephesus, he dies, His goods confiscate to the duke’s dispose; Unless a thousand marks be levied, To quit the penalty and to ransom him. Thy substance, valued at the highest rate, Cannot amount unto a hundred marks; Therefore by law thou art condemn’d to die. Æge.Yet this my comfort: when your words are done, My woes end likewise with the evening sun. Duke.Well, Syracusian, say, in brief, the cause Why thou departed’st from thy native home, And for what cause thou camest to Ephesus. Æge.A heavier task could not have been imposed Than I to speak my griefs unspeakable: Yet, that the world may witness that my end Was wrought by nature, not by vile offence, I’ll utter what my sorrow gives me leave. In Syracusa was I born; and wed Unto a woman, happy but for me, And by me, had not our hap been bad. With her I lived in joy; our wealth increased By prosperous voyages I often made To Epidamnum; till my factor’s death, And the great care of goods at random left, Drew me from kind embracements of my spouse: From whom my absence was not six months old, Before herself, almost at fainting under The pleasing punishment that women bear, Had made provision for her following me, And soon and safe arrived where I was. There had she not been lon but she became
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