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The Eternal Maiden

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63 pages
The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Eternal Maiden, by T. Everett HarréThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Eternal MaidenAuthor: T. Everett HarréRelease Date: June 20, 2005 [eBook #16093]Language: English***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ETERNAL MAIDEN***E-text prepared by Al HainesTHE ETERNAL MAIDENA NovelbyT. EVERETT HARRÉPublished byMitchell KennerleyNew YorkPress of J. J. Little & Ives CompanyEast Twenty-fourth StreetNew York1913TOEDGAR WILSON RIDDELLJANUARY 31, 1892—JULY 2, 1912IN MEMORY OFA LIFE'S SUPREME FRIENDSHIPTHE ETERNAL MAIDENPRELUDELong ages ago, darkness brooded over the frozen world and held in its thrall the unreleased waters of the glacial seas.There was no animal life upon the land, and in the depth of the waters no living thing stirred. Kokoyah, the water god,breathed not; Tornahhuchsuah, the earth spirit, who rules above the spirits of the wind and air, was veiled in slumber.Men had risen like willows from the frozen earth; but, although they lived, they were as the dead. They spake not,neither did they hunt, nor eat, nor did they die. Then the Great Spirit, whose name is not known, placed upon earth aman, in his arms the strength to kill, in his heart the primal urge of love. And in that ...
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The Project Gtuneebgre oBko ,e TherEtl naidMa ,neT ybvE .tererrét Ha
E-text prepared by Al Haines
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ETERNAL MAIDEN***
TO EDGAR WILSON RIDDELL JANUARY31, 1892—JULY2, 1912
THE ETERNAL MAIDEN A Novel by T. EVERETT HARRÉ Published by Mitchell Kennerley New York Press of J. J. Little & Ives Company East Twenty-fourth Street New York 1913
Title: The Eternal Maiden
Release Date: June 20, 2005 [eBook #16093] Language: English
Author: T. Everett Harré
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
IN MEMORY OF A LIFE'S SUPREMEFRIENDSHIP
THE ETERNAL MAIDEN PRELUDE
Long ages ago, darkness brooded over the frozen world and held in its thrall the unreleased waters of the glacial seas. There was no animal life upon the land, and in the depth of the waters no living thing stirred. Kokoyah, the water god, breathed not; Tornahhuchsuah, the earth spirit, who rules above the spirits of the wind and air, was veiled in slumber. Men had risen like willows from the frozen earth; but, although they lived, they were as the dead. They spake not, neither did they hunt, nor eat, nor did they die. Then the Great Spirit, whose name is not known, placed upon earth a man, in his arms the strength to kill, in his heart the primal urge of love. And in that flowerless arctic Eden, out of its bounteous compassion, the Great Spirit placed also a maiden, her face beautiful with the young virginity of the world, in her bosom implanted a yearning, not unmixed with fear, for love. Gazing upon her, the youth's heart stirred, with desire, the maiden's with virginal terror. The maiden fled, the youth followed. Over the desolate icy mountains the fleet feet of the youth sped with the swiftness of the wind gods, over the silent white seas the maiden with the elusiveness of the air spirits. In the heart of the youth throbbed the passion of love, indomitable, eternal, which the blasting breath of time should never kill. In the maiden's bosom quaked a reasonless shame, an unconquerable terror. Surrounded by her whirling cloud of hair, the maiden sprang, untiring, across the wild white world. His strength failing, the youth pantingly followed. Thousands of years passed; the breathless pursuit continued; the maiden's nebulous hair became shot with streaks of golden fire, from her eyes beams of light streamed across the expanses over which she exultantly, fearfully bounded; the tremulous faltering youth's face paled until it shone silvery in the darkness, and the beads of perspiration on his forehead glowed with a strange lustre. Reaching, in their mad race, the very edge of the earth, the maiden leaped, fiery, into space, and her hair becoming suddenly molten, she became the sun—the eternal maiden Sukh-eh-nukh, the beautiful, the all-desired. Utterly exhausted, his wan arms yearningly outstretched, the youth swooned after her into the heavens, and was transformed into the moon—the ever-desiring, ever-sorrowing moon. In the smile of Sukh-eh-nukh the seas melted. Walrus and narwhals, seals and whales came into being on the bosom of Kokoyah; on the earth the snows disappeared, and the browof Tornahhuchsuah was crowned with green grasses and starry flowers. Men hunted game, women laughed for joy; they beat drums, they danced, they sang. By the eternal, unrequited passion of the lovers in the skies, happiness and plenty came upon the earth. But, with Light, came also Death. Jealous of men's happiness, Perdlugssuaq, the Great Evil, brought sickness; he struck men on the hunt, on the seas, in the mountains. He was ever feared. He made the Great Dark terrible. But when the night became bright with the love-lorn glamour of the moon, Perdlugssuaq was for the time forgotten; in their hearts men felt a vague, tender, and ineffable stirring—the lure of a passion stronger and stranger even than death. They gazed upon the moon with instinctive, undefined pity. So, as the years passed, and ages melted and remade the snows, the long day was golden with the Beauty that is ever desired, the Ideal never attained; the night was softly silver with the melancholy and eternal hope of the deathless love that eternally desires, eternally pursues, and is eternally denied. Thus runs the Eskimo legend.
h, green and motltdeg lo.dT eha wis  rthniun cngrolofo sama tnarow,gd sned tleamhgt rhuoolduehc tupeer pov clyaltiw derena eci hf or mht sepladeidden hee mist-hor aa raohs  ,erngliun gofs at gnis oo d etsrtbi thelongce ailenirf htiw maws rihe tAs. refid giuorgfo pnem lno  snd. eat Yee tht ihgno  naldna rom every livingaercs def esor ma , ceenenhtigfromemua ts litnfos. Aight a tfter csel al, wnarhognolard- det ehtrs detecquick ea ,htie rta eilefimanf  ousorche ht ni enotrednu e an likhen,ds.Th aeehritnt  yeb cedllsears ffliitiguf eeergylevth rn wins oibboelg  fap ,odarssir aAl. g one thaecow ,nereherc vices of the desecdnni grinoc-ihskoozgoo suolumelyusyojop ruirchnu.g royhtiet  oes lativhe nAs td deskcu-ynwgniwinatgug ur p mr,c ooi cnlielomst, and tressantlyrrdes it eos .hTir.Nhe a manot acnelis oa ehT .ebrvid unnt iedatanas lebllwoni gistened, a deep t nabmer delt niomfrhe tar fce oskimof Eing howllo-fdew ceohht es,op tintaunmoe ht erehT .sgod olled. Frwks shrimade .aHku scsersceye amr iollvai raretnt mof ehar ausfwalrany  nhs eem "htaw,yadher eithk ooshM".yamsid htiw s. "Walrureturned rwayaP sot oaf no," o,teou"Nd.ow d nem ehtimitagni!eA"ehd tst nt histaon morizssguldrelliw qaue iktr serthu yoei sfow tareg erat floes swirledthgieb y sgrmool. ed sInftwidd er
I "Her cheeks were flushed delicately with the soft pink of the lichen flowers that bloom in the rare days of early summer. Her eyes played with a light as elusive, as quick as the golden radiance on the seas."
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