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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 5, Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 5, May, 1886, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 5, Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 5, May, 1886 Author: Various Release Date: April 21, 2008 [EBook #25116] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NEW ENGLAND MAGAZINE, MAY 1886 ***
Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, Anne Storer and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by Cornell University Digital Collections)
Transcriber’s Note: Table of Contents / Illustrations added.
ART, D.DSAMUEL HOFDRB. YEG ,AHTR CTYLEOLSTNTNIRICETNOrinill.towne. br n81egi loelytc .smsiallwi. .j28 pohsib fo eutatSSOR OF ., PROFEultsaritALIT.NlIy itllcos:onintr.968c .t ege1 ni nmsmaosajemti.hllias wifortms,  sraey y rotinajniri tofleol ctyrbwoenll ,not eh campus.proposedwen loc egeliub inld.ggs weoliil.yrarbil eht ni d,ansl ideho rofanutS(gi88.5ni1 ege collity trini ,eht n s'yrtimsep urab.bgehoisawtnno ,fog vo .y.chair e librarli Eelmunaig(SotangiS(niaS )erutSignoot(e) Aatur ).JutereKfrB  .Sin(atgne)uril S )erS .NhW .otaeure) D. R. GoodwsaT toet(niSngtaENLLll.IN HE AM.am:nfhsrrtsuoitaSTER FAM.THE WEBNO .TSPELI.YYBH asmngyw nee thonogol egelloc.muignatn(Sickso. Janyhc.RP T  .ru)eG .PDLIUR A.NAMO OCEKIF  PNGLIHID PERAUTERF ROE UROPE.BY EDWARD VILO OT.EDNEW REMEOL HLLIS HONS.rseeidleco dinenielf daster webahelsra sno:dlw ustratioRICH.Ill.L TDLA EH YREBRFOED.BRD.NNE BEWB IR Y.DM RA.EYBCTURE PIN.THRKMAOW KCOLLUB YNNAFY 4B41--R.WAS P'g the wharfs and fht eirev.rlanovearths.hee  oad stenolaht ghw end fet amarkish .trfedoptserno t htycil.d anl alerrab dnio fo slhurch, utarian certeu.innuoi ntse,usaw hl'elhos .teednamnoinrts ayorof mnce side.terrteeens htrochyad anh rchu cenots eht.hctor sa tectnru.yen w relics of the lc dlnoloar yorliatstn io tof ohe tohocrurgcasu.eustoad.cuse.m hoikool.hc nwod gncoisepe urchl paesuobup.iteeh-gny.arNRHEc librliDHT EMA YABNRRADUCATOR.ERICAN E.NOH ETAL EHT YBRILBHI PD.N OH J RFOHGETD UAKCA.S.BYITAN PUR THEclt  hubseouis.fsi hdnalaes.'nems bethel and saiol'r sohemm.rehcan' tsananchmed nab 'sciediser.kof jnce h grosepllf.niensdm irne.DROCEAL RORICHISTBLE. SATOT'RE.IDD WAHC YB.YROC SELRAS ONTICATOIS HOFICLAUJIDISIFF LAA B. ANNSEL. BENEMIT YB.JRAMEIRO OCETHF OLE N DE'S SEHORA.R MONAWLEY, LL.D.DORRI
NECROLOGY.
LITERATURE.
INDEX TO MAGAZINE LITERATURE.
Illustration: mark hopkins, d.d., ll.d.
THE
NEWENGLANDMA
AND
AGIZEN
 
 
lO deSirse
, Vol. IV. No. 5.
BAY STATE MONTHLY.
May, 1886.
Copyright, 1886, by Bay State Monthly Company. All rights reserved.
New Serise
, Vol. I. No. 5.
poration of YaleC loelegm tei  nt asfoef ortppfotiso,noiehtroc 823,y, 1was it vedeebila l  ,safo; ctfethn  or,d ht21 eaM fo yacsohlo ,emidac lition toa subscr nevr foecife,srn  ie thesofrssouqri herhwcica ts ofl itf aled oer dna ,droftraHt es the tedalpe.m
 imageTRINITY COLLEGE IN1869. The plan for the establishment of a second college in Connecticut was not carried into effect until after the time of the political and religious revolution which secured the adoption of a State Constitution in 1818. Probably no such plan was seriously entertained till after the close of the war of Independence. The Episcopal church in Connecticut had, one may almost say, been born in the library of Yale College; and though Episcopalians, with other dissenters from the “standing order,” had been excluded from taking any part in the government or the instruction of the institution, they did not forget how much they owed to it as the place where so many of their clergy had received their education. In fact, when judged by the standards of that day, it would appear that they had at first little cause to complain of illiberal treatment, while on the other hand they did their best to assist the college in the important work which it had in hand. But Yale College, under the presidency of Dr. Clap, assumed a more decidedly theological character than before, and set itself decidedly in opposition to those who dissented from the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Saybrook Platform of Discipline. Besides, King’s College, which had been lately founded in New York, drew away some Episcopal students from Connecticut and made others dissatisfied; and had not the war with the mother country rudely put a stop to the growth of Episcopacy in the colony, it would seem that steps might have been soon taken for the establishment of some institution of learning, at least a school of theology, under the care of the clergy of the Church of England. T C Brownell  imageTRINITY COLLEGE IN1828. At any rate no sooner was it known that the war was ended than the churchmen of Connecticut sent the Rev. Dr. Seabury across the ocean to seek consecration as a bishop; and it was not long after his return that the diocese, now fully organized, set on foot a plan for the establishment of an institution of sound learning, and in 1795 the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut was founded at Cheshire. It was sometimes called Seabury College, and, under its learned principals, it fitted many young men for entrance upon their theological studies, and gave them part at least of their professional training. But its charter, which was granted by the General Assembly of the State in 1801, did not give it the power of conferring degrees, and the frequent petitions for an extension of charter rights, so as to make of the academy a collegiate institution, were refused. For a time, owing to determined opposition in the State, to the vacancy in the episcopate, and to other causes, the project was postponed. But a combination of events, social, political, and religious, led at length to the great revolution in Connecticut, in which all dissenters from the standing order united in opposition to it, and secured in 1818, though it was by a small majority, the adoption of a State Constitution containing a clause which admitted of “secession” from any ecclesiastical society and secured perfect religious equality before the law. J Williams  
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