La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Darwin, and After Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of 3) - An Exposition of the Darwinian Theory and a Discussion of - Post-Darwinian Questions

De
467 pages
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Darwin, and After Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of3), by George John RomanesThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Darwin, and After Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of 3)An Exposition of the Darwinian Theory and a Discussion ofPost-Darwinian QuestionsAuthor: George John RomanesRelease Date: March 11, 2008 [EBook #24800]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DARWIN ***Produced by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe, LN Yaddanapudi andthe Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.netCharles DarwinDARWIN, AND AFTER DARWINAN EXPOSITION OF THE DARWINIAN THEORY AND A DISCUSSION OFPOST-DARWINIAN QUESTIONSBYGEORGE JOHN ROMANES, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.Honorary Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, CambridgeITHE DARWINIAN THEORYFOURTH EDITIONChicagoTHE OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY.1910The Illustrations of this book (with the exception of the Frontispiece and the colored plate facing page 332) arecopyrighted under the title “Darwinism Illustrated.”The Open Court Publishing Co.PRESS OF THEBLAKELY-OSWALD PRINTING CO.CHICAGOLetter from George Romanes to EdwardHagelerCh. Ch. Oxford:March 15th 1892.My dear Sir,As we have now agreed thatthe Open Court Publishing Company is toundertake the American edition ...
Voir plus Voir moins

Vous aimerez aussi

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Darwin, and After
Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of
3), by George John Romanes
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Darwin, and After Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of 3)
An Exposition of the Darwinian Theory and a
Discussion of
Post-Darwinian Questions
Author: George John Romanes
Release Date: March 11, 2008 [EBook #24800]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
DARWIN ***
Produced by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe, LNProduced by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe, LN
Yaddanapudi and
the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net
Charles Darwin
DARWIN, AND AFTER
DARWIN
AN EXPOSITION OF THE
DARWINIAN THEORY
AND A DISCUSSION OF
POST-DARWINIAN
QUESTIONS
BYGEORGE JOHN
ROMANES, M.A., LL.D.,
F.R.S.
Honorary Fellow of
Gonville and Caius
College, Cambridge
I
THE DARWINIAN
THEORY
FOURTH EDITION
Chicago
THE OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY.
1910
The Illustrations of this book (with the exception of the
Frontispiece and the colored plate facing page 332)
are copyrighted under the title “Darwinism Illustrated.”
The Open Court Publishing Co.PRESS OF THE
BLAKELY-OSWALD PRINTING CO.
CHICAGO
Letter from George Romanes to Edward Hageler
Ch. Ch. Oxford:
March 15th 1892.
My dear Sir,
As we have now agreed that
the Open Court Publishing Company is to
undertake the American edition of my
work entitled “Darwin and after
Darwin,” I have much pleasure
in transferring to you the copyright
thereof, with all that this
includes.
Thanking you very much for
the kindness and liberality which
have marked your conduct of these
negotiations,
I remain,
Yours very faithfully,
George J. Romanes
To
Edward C. Hegeler Esq.
La Salle, Ill. U. S.PREFACE
Several years ago Lord Rosebery founded, in the
University of Edinburgh, a lectureship on “The
Philosophy of Natural History,” and I was invited by the
Senatus to deliver the lectures. This invitation I
accepted, and subsequently constituted the material of
my lectures the foundation of another course, which
was given in the Royal Institution, under the title
“Before and after Darwin.” Here the course extended
over three years—namely from 1888 to 1890. The
lectures for 1888 were devoted to the history of
biology from the earliest recorded times till the
publication of the “Origin of Species” in 1859; the
lectures for 1889 dealt with the theory of organic
evolution up to the date of Mr. Darwin’s death, in
1882; while those of the third year discussed the
further developments of this theory from that date till
the close of the course in 1890.
It is from these two courses—which resembled each
other in comprising between thirty and forty lectures,
but differed largely in other respects—that the present
treatise has grown. Seeing, however, that it has
Grown much beyond the bulk of the original lectures, I
have thought it desirable to publish the whole in the
form of three separate works. Of these the first—or
that which deals with the purely historical side of
biological science—may be allowed to stand over for
an indefinite time. The second is the one which is now
brought out and which, as its sub-title signifies, is
devoted to the general theory of organic evolution as
this was left by the stupendous labours of darwin. assoon as the translations shall have been completed,
the third portion will follow (probably in the autumn
season), under the sub-title, “post-darwinian
questions.”
As the present volume is thus intended to be merely a
systematic exposition of what may be termed the
Darwinism of Darwin, and as on this account it is likely
to prove of more service to general readers than to
professed naturalists, I have been everywhere careful
to avoid assuming even the most elementary
knowledge of natural science on the part of those to
whom the exposition is addressed. The case,
however, will be different as regards the next volume,
where I shall have to deal with the important questions
touching Heredity, Utility, Isolation, &c., which have
been raised since the death of Mr. Darwin, and which
are now being debated with such salutary vehemence
by the best naturalists of our time.
My obligations to the Senatus of the University of
Edinburgh, and to the Board of Management of the
Royal Institution, have already been virtually
expressed; but I should like to take this opportunity of
also expressing my obligations to the students who
attended the lectures in the University of Edinburgh.
For alike in respect of their large numbers, their keen
intelligence, and their generous sympathy, the
members of that voluntary class yielded a degree of
stimulating encouragement, without which the labour
of preparing the original lectures could not have been
attended with the interest and the satisfaction that I
found in it. My thanks are also due to Mr. R. E.
Holding for the painstaking manner in which he hasassisted me in executing most of the original drawings
with which this volume is illustrated; and likewise to
Messrs. Macmillan and Co. for kindly allowing me to
reprint—without special acknowledgment in every case
—certain passages from an essay which they
published for me many years ago, under the title
“Scientific Evidences of Organic Evolution.” Lastly, I
must mention that I am indebted to the same firm for
permission to reproduce an excellent portrait of Mr.
Darwin, which constitutes the frontispiece.
G. J. R.
Christ Church, Oxford,
April 19th, 1892.
CONTENTS
PAG
E
CHAPTER I.
Introductory 1
CHAPTER II.
Classification 23
CHAPTER III.
Morphology 50
CHAPTER IV.
Embryology 98CHAPTER V.
Palæontology 156
CHAPTER VI.
Geographical Distribution 204
CHAPTER VII.
The Theory of Natural Selection 251
CHAPTER VIII.
Evidences of the Theory of Natural Selection 285
CHAPTER IX.
Criticisms of the Theory of Natural Selection 333
CHAPTER X.
The Theory of Sexual Selection, and Concludin
379
g Remarks
Appendix to Chapter V. 421
Note A to Page 257 443
Note B to Page 295 445
Note C to Page 394 448
Index 451
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
P
A
Fig.
G
E1. Successive forms of Paludina, from the Tertiary 1
deposits of Slavonia 9
5
2. Skeleton of Seal
2
5
3. Skeleton of Greenland Whale
3
5
4. Paddle of Whale compared with Hand of Man
4
5
5. Wing of Reptile, Mammal, and Bird
6
6
6. Skeleton of Dinornis gravis
1
6
7. Hermit crabs compared with the cocoa-nut crab
4
6
8. Rudimentary or vestigial hind-limbs of Python
7
6
9. Apteryx Australis
9
10. Illustrations of the nictitating membrane in vario 7
us animals named 5
11. Rudimentary, or vestigial and useless, muscles 7
of the human ear 6
7
12. Portrait of a young male gorilla
8
7
13. Portrait of a young male child
9
14. An infant, three weeks old, supporting its own 8
weight 1
15. Sacrum of Gorilla compared with that of Man, 8

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin