//img.uscri.be/pth/6bd74b8d3b85fe505283ce34a8e6dd9ded994d65
La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Memories of Hawthorne

De
508 pages
Project Gutenberg's Memories of Hawthorne, by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading
or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not
change or edit the header without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this
file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can also
find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!****
Title: Memories of Hawthorne
Author: Rose Hawthorne Lathrop
Release Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6926] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first
posted on February 12, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MEMORIES OF HAWTHORNE ***
MEMORIES OF HAWTHORNE
By
Rose Hawthorne Lathrop PREFACE
It will be seen that this volume is really written by Sophia Hawthorne; whose letters from earliest girlhood are so
expressed, and so profound in thought and loveliness, that some will of ...
Voir plus Voir moins

Project Gutenberg's Memories of Hawthorne, by
Rose Hawthorne Lathrop
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be
sure to check the copyright laws for your country
before downloading or redistributing this or any
other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when
viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not
remove it. Do not change or edit the header
without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other
information about the eBook and Project
Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is
important information about your specific rights and
restrictions in how the file may be used. You can
also find out about how to make a donation to
Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla
Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By
Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands
of Volunteers!****
Title: Memories of HawthorneAuthor: Rose Hawthorne Lathrop
Release Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6926]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of
schedule] [This file was first posted on February
12, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK MEMORIES OF HAWTHORNE ***
MEMORIES OF
HAWTHORNEBy
Rose Hawthorne LathropPREFACE
It will be seen that this volume is really written by
Sophia Hawthorne; whose letters from earliest
girlhood are so expressed, and so profound in
thought and loveliness, that some will of sterner
quality than a daughter's must cast them aside. I
have tried to weed out those written records of
hers (even from 1820) reaching to her last year in
1871, that could give no especial pleasure to any
descendant who might come upon them; and I
have been astonished to find that there was
scarcely one such page. This is the explanation of
my return, in the company of the friends of my
father and mother, to an old garden, a familiar
discourse, and a circle of life that embraced so
much beauty.
ROSE HAWTHORNE LATHROP.
NEW YORK, February 20th, 1897.CONTENTS
[online ed: page numbers omitted]
CHAPTER I
THE HAWTHORNES AND THE PEABODYS
The Hawthornes summoned from their quietude by
the Peabodys. Sophia Peabody's mother and
grandmother, the latter wife of General Palmer,
who was prominent in the Revolution.
Characteristics of the Misses Peabody. Letters to
the Hawthornes from the Peabodys, though so
close at hand, because of the difficulty of seeing
the former at any time. The dignity of George
Peabody's nature. Sophia's fondness for profound
books. The great affection of friends for her, who
bring rare flowers to the little studio where she is
often imprisoned. Elizabeth Hawthorne consents to
walk with the Peabodys. Dr. Channing's regard for
Sophia's artistic talent and motive. Miss Burley's
literary club, to which Hawthorne liked to go with
Sophia. The wooing not a moment delayed. Visits
from Emerson and Very. Elizabeth goes forth
among the most interesting people of Boston, and
remains to teach their daughters.
CHAPTER IITHE DAYS OF THE ENGAGEMENT
Hawthorne and Sophia become engaged, but defer
the announcement for a year. Sophia visits friends
in Boston, and Hawthorne visits Boston also.
Washington Allston's deep approval of Sophia's
talents. Elizabeth visits the Emersons in Concord,
and writes as if from heaven. Mr. Bancroft
remarked to Emerson that Hawthorne was
exceptionally thorough in business. Sophia draws
and paints vigorously in her happy security of the
highest love. Letters from Hawthorne to her.
Fragment of a Scrap-Book kept by Hawthorne at
the Boston Custom House. Friends rejoice in the
engagement when it is made known.
CHAPTER III
THE EARLY DAYS OF THE MARRIAGE
The beautiful marriage is appreciated by all. Letters
to Mrs. Caleb Foote and to Sophia's mother
describe life at the Old Manse in Concord. The
birth of Una. Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne
skate upon the river near the Manse, with differing
aspects. The radiance and sublimity of a
Massachusetts winter enrich the landscape.
Evening readings by Hawthorne to his wife from
the classics begun and always continued. Friends
call somewhat frequently, at last, from the outside
world; Visits to relatives in Boston and Salem. Mary
Peabody becomes the wife of Horace Mann.Sophia describes Una's favorable impression upon
the circle of friends in Salem and Boston.
Returning to the Old Manse renews the enjoyment
of nature and peace.
CHAPTER IV
LIFE IN SALEM
Salem becomes their home for the second time.
Letter from George W. Curtis while in Europe.
Sophia expresses in a letter to Hawthorne her
entire satisfaction, though poor and in the midst of
petty cares, under his enchanting protection.
Daniel Webster's oration in Salem. Alcott's
monologue. Thoreau's lecture. Letters about the
attack of certain mistaken people upon Hawthorne
as a Democrat and official. Hawthorne writes to
Horace Mann upon the subject. The best citizens
are active to remedy the offense against
Hawthorne. George Mullet's letters describing
Hawthorne as official and man.
CHAPTER V
FROM SALEM TO BERKSHIRE
The Hawthornes seek a home by the sea, but drift
up to the mountains of Berkshire, and are happy.
Letter from Mrs. James R. Lowell, nee White. The
Sedgwicks are the kindest friends in the world.Herman Melville is drawn to the life by Mrs.
Hawthorne, in a letter to her mother. A poem, by
Mrs. Hawthorne, to her husband.
CHAPTER VI
LENOX
Letters and visits from friends are frequent in
Lenox, where a literary group begin to suggest
flight to the Hawthornes, who have no liking for a
fussy succession of intercourse. Hawthorne reads
the "House of the Seven Gables" aloud to his wife
as he writes it. He sends a long letter to William B.
Pike. Charming long letters come from Herman
Melville, though he is not far off.
CHAPTER VII
FROM LENOX TO CONCORD
Letter, full of amused astonishment, from
Hawthorne to Mrs. Tappan. Descriptions of the
divine Lenox home life, by Mrs. Hawthorne. The
removal to West Newton, and finally to Concord, is
made. Letter from Maria L. Porter, a kindred
nature. Mr. Alcott is lovingly analyzed by Mrs.
Hawthorne. Letters to her from Mr. Alcott. Letters
to her, from Emerson, of an earlier date. Letters
from Margaret Fuller. Mrs. Hawthorne describes
The Wayside. General Solomon McNiel wields hisaffable sword. The Emersons pervade the little
town like reigning powers.
CHAPTER VIII
THE LIVERPOOL CONSULATE
The Wayside begins to be hospitable in earnest,
and Mr. Miller, the artist, talks unceasingly there.
Mrs. Hawthorne describes her husband.
Hawthorne visits the Isles of Shoals. Ex-President
Pierce is insulted and bears it well. Hawthorne
visits Brunswick College, and is welcomed back
there. A talk on The Wayside hill. The Liverpool
Consulate is given to Hawthorne, who visits
Washington before embarking for England.
Description of Hawthorne by his daughter Rose.
The voyage is described in a letter from Mrs.
Hawthorne. Field Talfourd pleases her, especially.
Mr. Henry Bright shines upon the family. Rose
describes him. Mrs. Hawthorne writes to her father
about him, his family at their home, and of English
ways.
CHAPTER IX
ENGLISH DAYS: I
Hospitable English strangers make the American
strangers welcome. An English mansion described
by Mrs. Hawthorne. Liverpool organizations honor