//img.uscri.be/pth/69fceab9f8fd44d35dab1e26b2ca88af052281f5
La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Travels in Morocco, Volume 2.

De
240 pages
Project Gutenberg's Travels in Morocco, Vol. 2., by James RichardsonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Travels in Morocco, Vol. 2.Author: James RichardsonRelease Date: December 1, 2003 [EBook #10356]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TRAVELS IN MOROCCO, VOL. 2. ***Produced by Carlo Traverso, Tom Allen and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team from images generouslymade available by the Bibliotheque nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) at http://gallica.bnf.fr.[Illustration]TRAVELS IN MOROCCO,BY THE LATE JAMES RICHARDSON,AUTHOR OF "A MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA,""TRAVELS IN THE DESERT OF SAHARA," &C.EDITED BY HIS WIDOW.[Illustration]IN TWO VOLUMES.VOL. II.CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.CHAPTER I.The Mogador Jewesses.—Disputes between the Jew and the Moor.—MelancholyScenes.—The Jews of the Atlas.—Their Religion.—Beautiful Women.—TheFour Wives.—Statues discovered.—Discrepancy of age of married people.—Young and frail fair ones.—Superstition respecting Salt.—WhiteBrandy.—Ludicrous Anecdote.CHAPTER II.The Maroquine dynasties.—Family of the Shereefian Monarchs.—Personal appearances and character of MuleyAbd Errahman.—Refutation of the charge of human sacrifices against the Moorish Princes.—Genealogy of ...
Voir plus Voir moins

Project Gutenberg's Travels in Morocco, Vol. 2., by
James Richardson
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Travels in Morocco, Vol. 2.
Author: James Richardson
Release Date: December 1, 2003 [EBook #10356]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK TRAVELS IN MOROCCO, VOL. 2. ***
Produced by Carlo Traverso, Tom Allen and the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team from images
generously made available by the Bibliotheque
nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) at
http://gallica.bnf.fr.[Illustration]
TRAVELS IN MOROCCO,
BY THE LATE JAMES RICHARDSON,
AUTHOR OF "A MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA,"
"TRAVELS IN THE DESERT OF SAHARA," &C.
EDITED BY HIS WIDOW.
[Illustration]
IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.CONTENTS OF THE SECOND
VOLUME.
CHAPTER I.
The Mogador Jewesses.—Disputes between the
Jew and the Moor.—Melancholy
Scenes.—The Jews of the Atlas.—Their Religion.
—Beautiful Women.—The
Four Wives.—Statues discovered.—Discrepancy of
age of married people.—
Young and frail fair ones.—Superstition respecting
Salt.—White
Brandy.—Ludicrous Anecdote.
CHAPTER II.
The Maroquine dynasties.—Family of the
Shereefian Monarchs.—Personal appearances and
character of Muley Abd Errahman.—Refutation of
the charge of human sacrifices against the Moorish
Princes.—Genealogy of the reigning dynasty of
Morocco.—The tyraufc Yezeed, (half Irish).—
Muley Suleiman, the "The Shereeff of Shereefs."—
Diplomatic relations of the Emperor of Morocco
with European Powers.—Muley Ismael enamoured
with the French Princess de Conti.—Rival
diplomacy of France and England near the
Maroquine Court.—Mr. Hay's correspondence with
this Court on the Slave-trade.—Treaties betweenGreat Britain and Morocco; how defective and
requiring amendment.—Unwritten engagements.
CHAPTER III.
The two different aspects by which the strength
and resources of the Empire of Morocco may be
viewed or estimated.—Native appellation of
Morocco.—Geographical limits of this country.—
Historical review of the inhabitants of North Africa,
and the manner in which this region was
successively peopled and conquered.—The distinct
varieties of the human race, as found in Morocco.
—Nature of the soil and climate of this country.—
Derem, or the Atlas chain of mountains.—Natural
products.—The Shebbel, or Barbary salmon;
different characters of exports of the Northern and
Southern provinces.—The Elæonderron Argan.—
Various trees and plants.—Mines.—The Sherb-
Errech, or Desert-horse.
CHAPTER IV.
Division of Morocco into kingdoms or States, and
zones or regions.—
Description of the towns and cities on the
Maroquine coasts of the
Mediterranean and Atlantic waters.—The Zafarine
Isles.—Melilla.—
Alhucemas.—Penon de Velez.—Tegaza.—
Provinces of Rif and Garet.—
Tetouan.—Ceuta.—Arzila.—El Araish.—Mehedia.—Salee.—Rabat.—
Fidallah.—Dar-el-Beidah.—Azamour.—Mazagran.
—Saffee.—Waladia.
CHAPTER V.
Description of the Imperial Cities or Capitals of the
Empire.— El-Kesar.—Mequinez.—Fez.—Morocco.
—The province of Tafilett, the birth-place of the
present dynasty of the Shereefs.
CHAPTER VI.
Description of the towns and cities of the Interior,
and those of the
Kingdom of Fez.—Seisouan.—Wazen.—Zawiat.—
Muley Dris.—Sofru.—
Dubdu.—Taza.—Oushdah.—Agla.—Nakbila.—
Meshra.—Khaluf.—The Places
distinguished in. Morocco, including Sous, Draka,
and Tafilett.—Tefza.
—Pitideb.—Ghuer.—Tyijet.—Bulawan.—Soubeit—
Meramer.—El-Medina.—
Tagodast.—Dimenet.—Aghmat.—Fronga.—
Tedmest.—Tekonlet.—Tesegdelt.—
Tagawost.—Tedsi Beneali.—Beni Sabih.—Tatta
and Akka.—Mesah or
Assah.—Talent.—Shtouka.—General observations
on the statistics of
population.—The Maroquine Sahara.
CHAPTER VII.London Jew-boys.—Excursion to the Emperor's
garden, and the Argan
Forests.—Another interview with the Governor of
Mogador on the
Anti-Slavery Address.—Opinion of the Moors on
the Abolition of Slavery.
CHAPTER VIII.
El-Jereed, the Country of Dates.—Its hard soil.—
Salt Lake. Its vast
extent.—Beautiful Palm-trees.—The Dates, a
staple article of Food.—
Some Account of the Date-Palm.—Made of
Culture.—Delicious Beverage.—
Tapping the Palm.—Meal formed from the Dates.
—Baskets made of the
Branches of the Tree.—Poetry of the Palm.—Its
Irrigation.—
Palm-Groves.—Collection of Tribute by the "Bey of
the Camp."
CHAPTER IX.
Tour in the Jereed of Captain Balfour and Mr.
Reade.—Sidi Mohammed.—
Plain of Manouba.—Tunis.—Tfeefleeah.—The
Bastinado.—Turkish
Infantry.—Kairwan.—Sidi Amour Abeda.—Saints.
—A French Spy—
Administration of Justice.—The Bey's presents.—The Hobara.—Ghafsa.
Hot streams containing Fish.—Snakes.—
Incantation.—Moorish Village.
CHAPTER X.
Toser.—The Bey's Palace.—Blue Doves.—The
town described.—Industry
of the People.—Sheikh Tahid imprisoned and
punished.—Leghorn.—The
Boo-habeeba.—A Domestic Picture.—The Bey's
Diversions.—The Bastinado.—
Concealed Treasure.—Nefta.—The Two Saints.—
Departure of Santa Maria.—
Snake-charmers.—Wedyen.—Deer Stalking.—
Splendid view of the Sahara.—
Revolting Acts.—Qhortabah.—Ghafsa.—Byrlafee.
—Mortality among the
Camels—Aqueduct.—Remains of Udina.—Arrival
at Tunis.—The Boab's
Wives.—Curiosities.—Tribute Collected.—Author
takes leave of the
Governor of Mogador, and embarks for England.—
Rough Weather.—Arrival
in London.
APPENDIX.TRAVELS IN MOROCCO.CHAPTER I.
The Mogador Jewesses.—Disputes between the
Jew and the Moor.—Melancholy
Scenes.—The Jews of the Atlas.—Their Religion.
—Beautiful Women.—The
Four Wives.—Statues discovered.—Discrepancy of
age of married people.—
Young and frail fair ones.—Superstition respecting
Salt.—White
Brandy.—Ludicrous Anecdote.
Notwithstanding the imbecile prejudices of the
native Barbary Jews, such of them who adopt
European habits, or who mix with European
merchants, are tolerably good members of society,
always endeavouring to restrain their own
peculiarities. The European Jewesses settled in
Mogador, are indeed the belles of society, and
attend all the balls (such as they are). The Jewess
sooner forgets religious differences than the Jew,
and I was told by a Christian lady, it would be a
dangerous matter for a Christian gentleman to
make an offer of marriage to a Mogador Jewess,
unless in downright earnest; as it would be sure to
be accepted.
Monsieur Delaport, Consul of France, was the first
official person who brought prominently forward the
native and other Jews into the European society of
this place, and since then, these Jews have