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Video Editing Workstation Tutorial

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Video Editing Workstation Tutorial April 7, 2006 – By: Mike Young This tutorial will guide you through the process of creating a basic video project consisting of still images and digital video. Even if you have lots of experience with non-linear video editing, it is still strongly recommended that you read this tutorial because there are unique aspects of this workstation that are critically important to know. The video editing workstation features FireWire input (for capturing video footage from a digital camcorder with FireWire output), a DVD writer, a secondary internal removable hard drive, and Sony Vegas Movie Studio+DVD. On this video editing workstation, the main hard drive (the “C:”) is where Windows and the video editing software are installed. The “C:” has been “Deep Frozen.” As a result, any changes to files and folders on “C:” will be lost when Windows is restarted. “C:” was Deep Frozen to prevent someone from corrupting Windows or changing the way the video editor is configured. It also prevents programs from being installed and retained on the system. That helps ensure that the system operates efficiently and stays uniform and user-friendly for everyone who uses it. CAUTION! Because “C:” is Deep Frozen, you will need to save all of your files on the secondary hard drive (the “E:”). If you save your files anywhere on “C:” they will be lost! This tutorial will show you how to save all your files on the “E:” so you will not ...
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Video Editing Workstation Tutorial
April 7, 2006 – By: Mike Young
This tutorial will guide you through the process of creating a basic video project
consisting of still images and digital video.
Even if you have lots of experience with non-
linear video editing, it is still strongly recommended that you read this tutorial because
there are unique aspects of this workstation that are critically important to know.
The video editing workstation features FireWire input (for capturing video footage from a
digital camcorder with FireWire output), a DVD writer, a secondary internal removable
hard drive, and Sony Vegas Movie Studio+DVD.
On this video editing workstation, the main hard drive (the “C:”) is where Windows and
the video editing software are installed.
The “C:” has been “Deep Frozen.”
As a result,
any changes to files and folders on “C:” will be lost when Windows is restarted.
“C:”
was Deep Frozen to prevent someone from corrupting Windows or changing the way the
video editor is configured.
It also prevents programs from being installed and retained on
the system.
That helps ensure that the system operates efficiently and stays uniform and
user-friendly for everyone who uses it.
CAUTION!
Because “C:” is Deep Frozen, you
will need to save all of your files on the secondary hard drive (the “E:”).
If you save your
files anywhere on “C:” they will be lost!
This tutorial will show you how to save all your
files on the “E:” so you will not lose them.
Upon turning on the computer, Windows will load.
On the desktop you will see shortcuts
to run Vegas Movie Studio 6.0 and DVD Architect Studio 3.0.
Vegas Movie Studio 6.0
is the video editing software and DVD Architect Studio 3.0 is the DVD authoring
software (used for creating DVDs from video that has already been edited and rendered).
It is very important to be organized when putting together a video
production.
So before we begin producing a video we must first prepare
project folders on “E:” to keep our project organized.
In this tutorial we will
call our project “Test Project”.
To create the folders do the following…
On the desktop double-click on “My Computer”.
Within “My Computer” double-click on “E:”.
Within “E:” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in the project name, in this case “Test Project”, and then press “ENTER”.
Double-click on “Test Project”.
Within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “video”, press “ENTER”, and click off of the folder so that it’s no longer
highlighted in blue.
Again, within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “audio”, press “ENTER”, and click off of the folder so that it’s no longer
highlighted in blue.
Again, within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “images”, press “ENTER”, and click off of the folder so that it’s no
longer highlighted in blue.
Again, within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “capture”, press “ENTER”, and click off of the folder so that it’s no
longer highlighted in blue.
Again, within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “rendered”, press “ENTER”, and click off of the folder so that it’s no
longer highlighted in blue.
Again, within “Test Project” click “File”, select “New”, and then select “Folder”.
Type in “dvd” and press “ENTER”.
By following those steps you have just created a folder
structure on “E:” as depicted in the picture on the right.
At this point you should gather any digital images that you
want to use in the sample video that we are about to put
together.
Copy the images to the “images” folder within
the folder “Test Project” that you just created.
We will
assume that we have three images in the images folder:
“image1.jpg”, “image2.jpg”, and “image3.jpg”.
Now close all windows and double-click on the “Vegas
Movie Studio 6.0” shortcut on the desktop.
Vegas Movie
Studio 6.0 will then load and open a new project.
We can
now start by adding pictures to the video project.
In the
bottom left portion of the screen you will see the file
explorer.
Double-click on “My Computer”, then “E:”, then
“Test Project”, then “images”, then “image1.jpg”.
Upon double-clicking on the image it
will be loaded in the timeline.
You can add additional images by double-clicking on
them from the file explorer or by clicking and dragging them into the timeline.
Now add
“image2.jpg” and “image3.jpg”.
You have now added still images to the video.
Please consult the Vegas Movie Studio
6.0 manual for learning about the extensive set of editing operations and effects you can
apply to still pictures.
Next we will capture digital video footage
and add it to our project.
First, load your
digital video camcorder with the tape
containing the footage you wish to capture.
Then connect the camcorder to the
computer’s FireWire port.
To do so you
will need a FireWire cable.
Your camcorder
most likely came with one.
The FireWire
port is located in the back of the computer
just to the right of the sound connections.
Consult your camcorder manual to find out
where the FireWire port is on your
camcorder.
It doesn’t matter which of the
three FireWire ports on the computer you
plug the camcorder into.
Once your
camcorder is connected to the computer turn
your camcorder on and set it to playback mode.
Now, within Vegas Movie Studio 6.0, click on “File”, then select “Capture Video”.
A
window will appear titled “Sony Video Capture 6.0”.
Another window will also open.
It
will state that you need to verify the tape name.
Just click “Cancel” to that window.
Within the “Sony Video Capture 6.0” window click on “Options” and select
“Preferences…”.
When the “Preferences” window opens, click on the “Disk
Management” tab.
You will see that the program is currently set to capture to “E:\”.
While capturing directly to “E:\” is okay to do, it’s recommended to instead capture the
project footage to its own capture folder.
That way we stay organized if we have
multiple projects on “E:”.
To select the proper folder, click on “Add Folder”, as seen in
the picture to the right.
You must now select where you want the captured video to be stored.
In the case of our
sample project, we already created a folder for storing captured video footage.
Browse to
“E:\Test Project\capture” and click “OK”.
Now you will see that folder, in addition to
“E:\”.
We really only want to capture to “E:\Test Project\capture” so uncheck the box
next to “E:\”.
Now click “OK”.
NOTE:
Every time you turn on the computer and wish
to capture video you must select where you want the captured video to be stored.
That’s
because the “C:” is frozen and it will forget where you told it to capture to once the
computer is restarted.
You are now ready to capture video footage.
If you click on the “play” button in the
capture window your camcorder should start playing and you should see what’s playing
in the preview window.
While the footage is playing, if you click on the “Capture
Video” button then the program will start capturing the footage live.
To stop capturing
footage, click on the “stop” button or hit the “ESC” key.
When you are done capturing
footage a window will appear, confirming that capture is complete.
Click “Done” on that
window.
There are more sophisticated ways to capture video, though this method is the
most straightforward.
Feel free to explore other methods referenced by the Vegas Movie
Studio 6.0 manual.
Just be sure that you are capturing your video footage to “E:”.
Once you have captured footage you can add it to the timeline.
First, close out of the
capture window if it is still open.
Then, in the file explorer in the bottom left portion of
the screen (be sure to click on the “Explorer” tab to get the file explorer) browse to
“E:\Test Project\capture”.
Within that folder you should find all the video clips that you
just captured.
You can either double-click on them or drag them into the timeline.
At
this point you may wish to consult the manual to learn how to edit the footage together
using video transitions, text, etc.
We will continue on now as if we are ready to output
what we have to a final video file, which will then be used to make a DVD.
Now would
also be a good time to save your project.
Click on “File” and select “Save”.
If you have
not already saved your project then choose a name for it.
Be sure that you are saving it to
“E:” and not “C:”.
In this example we would save it to “E:\Test Project” and we would
call the project “Test Project 1”.
It’s a good idea to save often and to save different
versions when the project undergoes changes.
That way, if need be, you can easily go
back to older versions without wasting time re-editing your footage.
Once you have your video footage edited you must now “render” it to a video file so that
it can be “encoded” and “authored” by the DVD program and then written to a DVD.
To
render the project to a video file click on “File” and select “Render As…”.
Now type in a
name for the video file that you are about to render.
Something like “Test Project final
render” would make sense.
You must also select where to save this rendered video file.
Again, we don’t want to save it to the “C:” because it will be lost when the computer is
restarted.
Instead we must save the rendered video file to the “E:”.
We already created a
folder within our project folder called “rendered”.
Select the folder “E:\Test
Project\rendered”, then click on “Save”.
The project will then be rendered.
Depending
on the length of your project and the amount of video processing required (such as for
adding text, transitioning between video clips, and motion cropping still images),
rendering may take a long time.
Once the file has been rendered we can now create a
DVD with it.
Click close to the render window when rendering is completed.
To create a DVD using the video project file we just rendered, first save your project in
Vegas Movie Studio 6.0 by clicking on “File” and selecting “Save”.
Be sure that you are
saving to the project folder in “E:”.
In the case of our example, that would be “E:\ Test
Project”.
Next, close out of Vegas Movie Studio 6.0 and double-click on DVD Architect
Studio 3.0.
Once the program loads you will see a blue backdrop in the middle of the
screen with text on it saying “Menu 1”.
Click on the “Menu 1” text, then right-click and
select “Edit Text”.
Now change that title text how you see fit, then click somewhere on
the blue backdrop to unselect the text.
Now right-click, again, somewhere in the blue
backdrop.
Then select “Insert Media”.
Now select the video file you just rendered.
It
should be located in “E:\Test Project\rendered”.
Once you have found and selected that
rendered video file it will appear as a button in the menu.
You can now save the project
and create the DVD.
To save the project, click on “File” and select “Save”.
Be sure to
save the DVD project file to the project folder.
Again, in the case of our example, you
would want to save the DVD project file to “E:\Test Project”.
In our example, a good
name to choose for the DVD project would be “Test Project dvd 1”.
Now that you have saved your project you must now create and then write the DVD
video to a DVD disc.
Click on the button labeled “Make DVD”.
A window will appear.
In that window select “Prepare DVD”.
Another window will then appear asking you to
specify a folder to write the DVD files to.
Click on “Browse” and select the “dvd” folder
in your project folder on “E:”.
In the case of our example, that would be “E:\Test
Project\dvd”.
Click “OK” once you have highlighted the folder.
Now click “Next”,
“Next”, and then “Finish”.
The project will then be “encoded” (process of compressing
the originally rendered video into DVD video) and “authored” (process of creating the
DVD structure, menus, etc.).
Just like rendering, encoding and authoring can take a long
time.
When the process is complete a window will appear.
Click “OK” to that window.
Once the DVD project has been “prepared” we can now write it to a DVD disc.
First
insert a blank, writable DVD into the DVD drive.
Then click on “Make DVD” and on
the next windows that appear, click on “Burn”, “Next”, and then “Finish”.
Once the
DVD has been written the program will ask you if you want to write another copy.
This concludes the basic video production tutorial.
For advanced methods of editing and
DVD creation you should consult the manuals.
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