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A longitudinal study on the occurrence of Cryptosporidiumand Giardiain dogs during their first year of life

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10 pages
The primary aim of this study was to obtain more knowledge about the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in young dogs in Norway. The occurrence of these parasites was investigated in a longitudinal study by repeated faecal sampling of dogs between 1 and 12 months of age (litter samples and individual samples). The dogs were privately owned and from four large breeds. Individual faecal samples were collected from 290 dogs from 57 litters when the dogs were approximately 3, 4, 6, and 12 months old. In addition, pooled samples were collected from 43 of the litters, and from 42 of the mother bitches, when the puppies were approximately 1 and/or 2 months old. Methods The samples were purified by sucrose gradient flotation concentration and examined by immunofluorescent staining. Results 128 (44.1%) of the young dogs had one or more Cryptosporidium positive samples, whilst 60 (20.7%) dogs had one or more Giardia positive samples. The prevalence of the parasites varied with age. For Cryptosporidium , the individual prevalence was between 5.1% and 22.5%, with the highest level in dogs < 6 months old, and declining with age. For Giardia , the individual prevalence was between 6.0% and 11.4%, with the highest level in dogs > 6 months old, but the differences between age groups were not statistically significant. Significant differences in prevalences were found in relation to geographic location of the dogs. Both parasites occurred at low prevalences in Northern Norway. Conclusion Both Cryptosporidium and Giardia are common in Norwegian dogs, with Cryptosporidium more prevalent than Giardia . Prevalences of the parasites were found to be influenced by age, geographical location, and infection status before weaning.
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Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
BioMedCentral
Open Access Research A longitudinal study on the occurrence ofCryptosporidiumand Giardiain dogs during their first year of life 1,2 11 Inger S Hamnes*, Bjørn K Gjerdeand Lucy J Robertson
1 Address: NorwegianSchool of Veterinary Science, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Section of Microbiology, Immunology and 2 Parasitology, P.O. Box 8146 Dep, N0033 Oslo, Norway andNational Veterinary Institute, Section for Parasitology, P.O. Box 8156 Dep., N0033 Oslo, Norway Email: Inger S Hamnes*  inger.hamnes@vetinst.no; Bjørn K Gjerde  bjorn.gjerde@veths.no; Lucy J Robertson  lucy.robertson@veths.no * Corresponding author
Published: 11 September 2007Received: 16 March 2007 Accepted: 11 September 2007 Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica2007,49:22 doi:10.1186/1751-0147-49-22 This article is available from: http://www.actavetscand.com/content/49/1/22 © 2007 Hamnes et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract Background:The primary aim of this study was to obtain more knowledge about the occurrence ofCryptosporidiumandGiardiain young dogs in Norway. The occurrence of these parasites was investigated in a longitudinal study by repeated faecal sampling of dogs between 1 and 12 months of age (litter samples and individual samples). The dogs were privately owned and from four large breeds. Individual faecal samples were collected from 290 dogs from 57 litters when the dogs were approximately 3, 4, 6, and 12 months old. In addition, pooled samples were collected from 43 of the litters, and from 42 of the mother bitches, when the puppies were approximately 1 and/or 2 months old. Methods:The samples were purified by sucrose gradient flotation concentration and examined by immunofluorescent staining. Results:128 (44.1%) of the young dogs had one or moreCryptosporidiumpositive samples, whilst 60 (20.7%) dogs had one or moreGiardiapositive samples. The prevalence of the parasites varied with age. ForCryptosporidium, the individual prevalence was between 5.1% and 22.5%, with the highest level in dogs < 6 months old, and declining with age. ForGiardia, the individual prevalence was between 6.0% and 11.4%, with the highest level in dogs > 6 months old, but the differences between age groups were not statistically significant. Significant differences in prevalences were found in relation to geographic location of the dogs. Both parasites occurred at low prevalences in Northern Norway. Conclusion:BothCryptosporidiumandGiardiaare common in Norwegian dogs, with Cryptosporidiummore prevalent thanGiardia. Prevalences of the parasites were found to be influenced by age, geographical location, and infection status before weaning.
Background GiardiaandCryptosporidiumare intestinal protozoan para sites of animals and humans, causing asymptomatic to severe intestinal infections, depending on the virulence of
theCryptosporidiumorGiardiaisolate involved and the immunological capabilities of the hosts.Cryptosporidium infections are common in humans and calves, but also occur in dogs, cats, pigs, horses, sheep, goats and wildlife
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