Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

Assessment of soil and sediment contamination in the Middle Nile Delta area (Egypt)[[Elektronische Ressource]] : Geo-Environmental study using combined sedimentological, geophysical and geochemical methods = Bewertung der Kontamination von Böden und Sediment im Mittleren Nil Delta Gebiet (Ägypten) / Atef Abu Khatita. Betreuer: Roman Koch

De
224 pages
Assessment of soil and sediment contamination in the Middle Nile Delta area (Egypt)- Geo-Environmental study using combined sedimentological, geophysical and geochemical methods Bewertung der Kontamination von Böden und Sediment im Mittleren Nil Delta Gebiet (Ägypten)- Geo-Environmentanalyse mittels kombinierter sedimentologischer, geophysikalischer und geochemischer Methoden. Der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades Dr. rer. nat. vorgelegt von ATEF MOHAMADY ABU KHATITA aus Gharbiya, Ägypten 2011 Als Dissertation genehmigt von der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg Tag der mündlichen Prüfung 17 August, 2011 Vorsitzender der Promotionskommission : Prof. Dr. Rainer Fink Erstberichterstatter: Prof. Dr. Roman Koch Zweitberichterstatterin: Prof. Dr. Helga De Wall Acknowledgements First of all, praise be to “Allah”, the Lord of the World, by whose grace this work has been completed. After four years of confusing, sometimes puzzling and disappointing efforts it is completed. Yet looking back, it was very a fruitful journey and it feels like it started only yesterday.
Voir plus Voir moins






Assessment of soil and sediment contamination
in the Middle Nile Delta area (Egypt)-
Geo-Environmental study using combined sedimentological,
geophysical and geochemical methods


Bewertung der Kontamination von Böden und Sediment
im Mittleren Nil Delta Gebiet (Ägypten)-
Geo-Environmentanalyse mittels kombinierter sedimentologischer,
geophysikalischer und geochemischer Methoden.






Der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät
der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

zur
Erlangung des Doktorgrades Dr. rer. nat.








vorgelegt von
ATEF MOHAMADY ABU KHATITA
aus

Gharbiya, Ägypten
2011







Als Dissertation genehmigt von der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät
der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg





















Tag der mündlichen Prüfung 17 August, 2011

Vorsitzender der
Promotionskommission : Prof. Dr. Rainer Fink

Erstberichterstatter: Prof. Dr. Roman Koch

Zweitberichterstatterin: Prof. Dr. Helga De Wall
Acknowledgements

First of all, praise be to “Allah”, the Lord of the World, by whose grace this work has
been completed.

After four years of confusing, sometimes puzzling and disappointing efforts it is
completed. Yet looking back, it was very a fruitful journey and it feels like it started only
yesterday.
Of course, behind this work there were many people who supported me along the way
and I wish to express my sincere gratitude to them.

First of all, I am deeply indebted to my supervisor Prof. Dr. R. KOCH (Friedrich-
Alexander University (FAU), Germany), who took me under his wing. Without him this
work would not have seen the light of day. Throughout the research, he provided useful
suggestions, many good ideas, guidance ranging from fieldwork up to the conclusion and
critical review of the thesis. I met him during unstable personal circumstances following
the illness of my initial supervisor. Over the years and even now he has alleviated all my
troubles, whether scientific or personal. I want to thank him for all his valuable comments
and fatherly care.

Sincere thanks go to Prof. Dr. H. DE WALL for his help, valuable suggestions,
measurements and fruitful discussions on the magnetic properties of the samples.

I would like to express my deep appreciation to Prof. H.J. TOBSCHALL, (FAU, Germany)
for initiating this project, for his invitation to come to Germany, initial guidance and his
great support.

Sincere thanks go to Prof. DR. R. ROßNER (who did not live to see the end of this work)
for his help.

I would like also to thank Prof. Dr. J. ROHN (FAU) who gave me the opportunity to meet
together with my supervisor Prof. Dr. Koch and helped me obtain the Schmauser-Stiftung
grant.

I would like to offer special thanks to Prof. Dr. J. BARTH for his cooperation and lively
encouragement, Prof. Dr. M. JOACHIMSKI for his help with the organic carbon analysis,
Dr. A. Baier for his help with the geochemical analysis, Dr. S. KRUMM and Mr. P.
LAUSSER for their guidance and XRD measurements and Rietveld analysis, Dr. V.
PUTYRSKAYA and Prof. Dr. E. KLEMT (Hochschule Ravensburg-Weingarten, Germany)
for help with the chronological studies, Dr. J. GÖSKE (for the SEM/EDX measurements)
and Prof. Dr. J. NEUBAUER for offering the use of his chemical laboratory, for his
recommendations and useful suggestions and for the review of the XRD method chapter.
My special gratitude also goes to the laboratory assistance staff in the Geozentrum
Nordbayern, namely, D. LUTZ, M. HERTEL, I. NICHOLSON, and B. Leipner for the thin
section preparation.

I am very grateful to Prof. Dr. R. BÄUMLER (FAU, Institute of Geography) for his critical
review and useful suggestions.

Prof. Dr. J. MATSCHULLAT and Dr. A. PLEßOW (TU Bergakademie Freiberg) should also
be acknowledged for their numerous good scientific discussions and corrections of an
intermediate version.

I greatly appreciate the various kinds of assistance from all the staff members as well as
my colleagues and everyone who made a contribution to this thesis in the Geozentrum
Nordbayern, FAU particularly Dr. TATJANA REHFELDT, Dr. MICHEL BESTMANN, Dr. Jana
JustMs. VERA LIPPKI, Ms. SONJA SZYMCZAK, (special thanks for the translation of the
German summary) Mr. JOHANNES ULLERMANN, Ms. MARION KAEMMLEIN and Mr. AMIR
NAVAB, equally grateful also to Mr. KHALIL BARDAG for his helping.

I thank Ms. K. CHRISTENSON for the fast English corrections chapter by chapter even over
weekends and holidays.

Many thanks to my professors, colleagues and friends at the Geology Department in the
Faculty of Science at Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt, for their continuous
encouragement. I am also thankful to Prof. Dr. A. EL KAMMAR (Geology Department,
Cairo University) for mentoring me and discussing my work.

I am grateful to the Egyptian government for giving me the opportunity to pursue this
scientific degree in the great country of Germany, particularly at the outstanding
Friedrich-Alexander University, through the Egypt mission scholarship program. This
work was also partly supported by the Dr. HERTHA & HELMUT SCHMAUSER Foundation
of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

Many warm thanks to my dear parents for giving me all their support and incalculable
help. Lastly, my heartfelt love and affection goes to my lovely wife EMAN and my sons
MAZEN and MOAZ for their encouragement, patience and understanding during this work.






Contents
Summary…………………………………………………………………..………. I
Zusammenfassung…………………………………………………………….…... III
1 Introduction……………………………………………………………….……... 1
1.1. Preface………………………………………………………………………... 1
1.2 Geology of the Nile Delta…………………………………………………….. 4
1.2.1 The Nile Sediment………………………………………………………… 5
1.2.2 Soils of the Nile Delta…………………………………………………….. 7
1.3 Regional setting of the study area…………………………………………….. 9
1.3.1 Topography……………………………………………………………….. 9
1.3.2 Climate…………………………………………………………………….. 10
1.3.3 Hydrology…………………………………………………………………. 11
1.3.4 Population…………………………………………………………………. 12
1.3.5 Industry……………………………………………………………………. 13
2 Methodology………………………………………………..……………………. 14
2.1. Field Work……………………………………………………………………. 14
2.2. Laboratory Work…………………………………………………………...… 16
2.2.1. Soil structure……………………………………………………………… 16
2.2.2. Grain size analysis (soil texture………………………………...………… 17
2.2.3. Microscopic analysis……………………………………………………... 18
2.2.4. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM/EDX)…………………………….. 18
2.2.5. Total Organic Carbon (TOC……………………………………………… 19
2.2.6. X-ray diffractometry (XRD)……………………………………………… 19
2.2.6. Density measurements……………………………………………………. 21
2.2.7. Magnetic susceptibility…………………………………………………… 21
1372.2.8 Age determination by Ce……………………………………………….. 21
2.2.9. Soil pH……………………………………………………………………. 22
2.2.10. X- ray florescence (XRF)……………………………………………….. 22
2.2.11. Cluster analysis………………………………………………………….. 23
2.2.12. Enrichment factor……………………………………………………….. 24
3 Results of Sedimentological and geochemical investigations………………... 25
3.1. Sedimentology of surface samples…………………………………………… 25
3.1.1. Grain size…………………………………………………………………. 25
3.1.2. Bulk mineralogy………………………………………………………….. 26
3.1.2.1. Mineral distribution within different grain size fractions……………. 27
3.1.3. Petrography………………………………………………………….……. 30
3.1.4. Industrial/anthropogenic particles………………………………………... 34 3.1.4.1. Nonmagnetic particles……………………………………………….. 34
3.1.4.2. Magnetic particles……………………………………...…………….. 40
3.1.5. Aerial distribution of contaminants………………………………………. 43
3.1.5.1. Magnetic spherule concentration…………………………………….. 44
3.1.5.2. Magnetic susceptibility…………………………………….………… 45
3.1.6. Distribution and geochemical characteristics…………………………….. 49
3.1.6.1. Cluster analysis of elements in surface soil samples…………………. 54
3.1.6.2. Anthropogenic input in cultivated soil………………………………. 58
3.1.6.3. Anthropogenic input in urban soil…………………………………… 62
3.1.6.4. Anthropogenic input in industrial soil………………………….……. 65
3.1.7. Elemental distribution and magnetic susceptibility measurements…….… 70
3.2. Nile Sediments……………………………………………………….……….. 73
3.2.1. Grain size……………………………………………………...………….. 73
3.2.2. Age dating of Nile sediments…………………..………………………… 75
3.2.3. Mineralogical composition……………………………………………….. 78
3.2.4. Clay Mineral co……………………………….…………….. 79
3.2.4.1. Origin of clay minerals in the soils……………………….………….. 81
3.2.5. Geochemical characteristics of Nile sediments ………………………….. 82
3.2.5.1. Distribution of elements in downcore Nile sediment…………...…… 85
3.3. Core material from cultivated, urban, and industrial soils…………………… 90
3.3.1. Grain size…………………………………………...…………………….. 90
3.3.2 The distribution of minerals in soil cores……………….………………… 92
3.3.2.1 Clay mineral composition……………………….…….……………… 94
3.3.3 Distribution of elements in different downcore soils……………………... 95
3.3.3.1. Distribution of elements in cultivated soils…………..……………… 95
3.3.3.2. Distribution of elements in urban soils………………………………. 97
3.3.3.3. Distribution of elements in industrial soils……………….………….. 98
4 Discussion………………………………………………………………………… 102
5 Conclusion………………………………….……………………………….……. 132
References ………………………………………………………………….………. 135
Appendices………………………………………………………………….………. 158

Summary
Historically, the Nile Delta, the area under investigation, is considered to be the gift of
the Nile to Egypt. It is the largest green belt area and is regarded as the basic agricultural
wealth of Egypt. Owing to the increasing number of inhabitants in this region and based
on the electrical power generated from the High Dam (constructed in 1964), a wide
variety of industrial activities have developed. In the absence of formal planning,
residential household areas are overlapping with industrial zones. As a consequence, the
various anthropogenic activities, including industrial activities, transportation networks,
residential domestic waste and sewage sludge effluents originating from within or from
nearby urban areas, as well as the use of fertilizer, pesticides and insecticides in the
farmlands are dispersing contaminants into the soil, water and air of the area. This would
ultimately lead to adverse affects on the flora, fauna and human health. Therefore, the
aim of this study was to evaluate the elements and mineralogical contents of the soil and
sediments of the studied area. Furthermore, the source and pathway of the potentially
harmful substances, which can cause risks or directly or indirectly affect human health
were determined.
For this 67 surface and 12 core samples were collected from soils of different land use
(cultivated, urban and industrial) along with 3 cores collected from the bottom of the
River Nile (Rosetta branch), before and after waste water discharge of chemicals from
fertilizer plants.
Sedimentology, the analysis of collected industrial particles, physiochemical parameters,
magnetic susceptibility, geochemical characteristics and statistical analysis were carried
out on the soil and sediments.
Due to the modifications of the sedimentation regime after the dam construction (1964),
some minerals were enriched and others were depleted. Based on the enrichment factor
calculation, the upper part shows marked depletion of quartz (EF = 0.49), garnet (EF =
0.53) and epidote (EF = 0.56), and enrichment in calcite (EF = 6.5), magnetic minerals
(EF = 2.8), clays (EF = 2.4), pyroxene (EF = 2.3), apatite (EF = 2.1), amphiboles EF =
(EF = 1.7), plagioclase (EF = 1.9), biotite, (EF = 1.6) and K-feldspars (EF = 1.2).
Waste water discharge from industrial factories leads to enrichment of trace elements on
the bottom sediments of the Nile. Relative to the local natural background the bottom
sediments display highly enriched As (EF = 6.6), Cu (EF = 5.5), Pb (EF = 5.0), P (EF =
4.9), Zn (EF = 4.6), Mn (EF = 3.4) and Ca (EF = 1.9), and these elements tend to
accumulate on the upper part pf the core and decrease with increasing depth.
The annual accumulations of Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn on the bottom sediments near waste
-1water discharge are calculated to be 1.6, 16.4, 2.3 and 4.7 ppm y , respectively.
Delta soil was classified as silty clay soil according to SHEPARD (1954) and is
composed mainly of clay minerals (59.6 wt. %), quartz (21.5 wt. %) and Plagioclase (5.4
wt. %) along with the less abundant minerals (13.5 wt.%) represented by K-feldspars,
amphiboles, pyroxene, biotite, garnet, epidote, calcite, apatite, magnetic menials (Fe- and
Ti-Oxides), gypsum and halite. Two groups of minerals can be distinguished through the
mineralogical composition of the different soils: natural (geogenic) phases and
anthropogenic/geogenic phases, based on the distribution of bulk mineral phases in the
different types of soil cores and in different grain size fractions. The first group contains
quartz, clay minerals, plagioclase K-feldspars, pyroxene, amphiboles, biotite, garnet, and
epidote, while the second group contains calcite, apatite and magnetic minerals in
addition to gypsum and halite.
I
Thin section analysis reveals that anthropogenic particles are included within the surface
soil samples. These particles were separated, estimated and subjected to intensive
analysis by SEM/EDX. These particles were then classified into magnetic and
nonmagnetic (spheroidal and nonspheroidal) particles.
In cultivated soils the anthropogenic particles originate from wood and straw combustion
in the farmlands, through fertilizers and farming practices. In industrial areas, most of the
particles arise from chemical and fertilizer plants along with brick factories, including
additional contributions from vehicle traffic. The anthropogenic particles collected from
urban areas indicate that the residential area surrounding industrial zones - particularly
those located in the windblown (SE) direction - are seriously affected by industrial dust.
In addition to the industrial dust, vehicle traffic contributes considerable amounts to the
anthropogenic particles. Both contour maps, which were based on the magnetic
properties of the surface soil (magnetic spherules per gram and magnetic susceptibility),
reveal that anthropogenic particles in the industrial zone are transported by wind in a SE
direction (main wind direction in the study area) up to a distance of 16 km, whereas the
maximum transport distance in the commercial zone is just 4.8 km.
Geochemical analysis classified the studied elements into two groups, based on statistical
analysis (correlation coefficient and cluster analysis) and enrichment factors. The first
group includes Fe, Co, Cr, Ni and V, which are mainly of natural origin and controlled by
the distribution of clay minerals. The other group of elements are from anthropogenic
sources and can classified based on the land use as follows; the elements dispersed by
industrial activities are As, Ca, Cu, Ba, Cu, Pb, P and Zn; the elements dispersed by
traffic emissions are Pb, Zn and some Cu; the elements influenced by agrochemicals and
drain water irrigation are As, P, Ca, Cu, and Pb. The concentrations of studied elements
are negatively correlated with the grain size fraction. The concentration of heavy metals
(As, Cu, Pb and Zn) in the studied area is still usually under the maximum acceptable
value and there is no evidence from the vertical distribution indicating element mobility.
It is worth mentioning that the areas characterized by high concentrations of
environmental elements are in the same areas that display anomalies on the contour maps.
These were based on the magnetic properties of soil (magnetic spherule concentration
and magnetic susceptibility) and the chemical composition of collected anthropogenic
particles. This result confirms the assumption that the magnetic properties can provide an
effective tool for demonstrating soil contaminants.

Previous to this study a few scattered publications documented the concentration of
heavy metals in the Nile Delta region. The present study provides a strong tool for better
understanding the composition and distribution of contaminants and their affect on
surrounding areas based on land use. For the first time one will be able to determine the
ecological status of an area, particularly in the studied region, based on several
independent geological approaches.
The study ends with recommendations for reducing the anthropogenic influences. These
comprise monitoring the air quality of the Nile Delta region where aerial deposition
represents the main pollution source of this region, preventing irrigation with
inadequately treated waste water and preventing the discharge of industrial waste water to
the Nile, which has led to an increase in the heavy metals in this very important fresh
water source.

II
Zusammenfassung
Das Nildelta, das Untersuchungsgebiet dieser Arbeit, ist die größte und fruchtbarste
landwirtschaftliche Nutzfläche Ägyptens und wird historisch als ein Geschenk des Nils
an Ägypten betrachtet. Gekennzeichnet ist das Nildelta durch eine hohe
Bevölkerungsdichte, verschiedene Industrien, die mit der hydroelektrischen
Stromerzeugung am Hohen Damm (erbaut im Jahr 1964) versorgt werden, sowie
intensive landwirtschaftliche Nutzung. Aufgrund fehlender Flächennutzungspläne kommt
es häufig zur Überlappung von Industrie- und Wohngebieten. Die intensive Nutzung des
Nildeltas führt zur Kontamination von Boden, Wasser und Luft mit negativen
Auswirkungen auf Flora, Fauna und die menschliche Gesundheit. Ziel der vorliegenden
Arbeit ist es, die Element- und Mineralkonzentrationen im Boden und in den Sedimenten
des Nildeltas zu erfassen und zu evaluieren. Dafür wurden die Quellen und Wege der
potentiell gesundheitsgefährdenden Substanzen identifiziert.
Für die Studie wurden 67 Bodenproben und 12 Bohrkerne (bis 50 cm Tiefe) von Flächen
mit unterschiedlicher Nutzung (landwirtschaftlich, urban und industriell) untersucht.
Zusätzlich wurden 3 Kerne vom Talboden des Nils (Rosetta branch) vor und nach der
Abwassereinleitung der Düngemittelindustrie analysiert.
Die Untersuchungen der Böden und Sedimente umfasste eine Beschreibung der
Sedimentologie, die Analyse von enthaltenen industriellen Partikeln, Bestimmung von
physikalisch-chemischen Parametern, Bestimmung magnetischer Eigenschaften und
geochemischer Charakteristika sowie statistische Analysen.
Durch den Bau des Hohen Damms im Jahre 1964 wurde das Sedimentationsregime des
Nils verändert, weshalb die Sedimente (Bohrkerne bis 50 cm Tiefe) eine Gradierung von
Sand zu schluffig-sandigem Ton aufweisen. Der Mineralgehalt änderte sich ebenfalls.
Der Anreicherungsfaktor (enrichment factor EF) zeigt, dass der obere Bereich an Quarz
(EF = 0.49), Granat (EF = 0.53) und Epdiot (EF = 0.56) abgereichert sowie an Kalzit (EF
= 6.5), magnetischen Mineralen (EF = 2.8), Ton (EF = 2.4), Pyroxen (EF = 2.3), Apatit
(EF = 2.1), Amphibol (EF = 1.7), Plagioklas (EF = 1.9), Biotit (EF = 1.6) und Kalium-
Feldspat (EF = 1.2) angereichert ist.
Industrieabwässer führten zu einer Anreicherung von Spurenelementen in den
Sedimentschichten unterhalb der Einleitungsstelle in den Nil. Diese Sedimente weisen
gegenüber des natürlichen Mineralgehaltes eine deutlich höhere Konzentration von As
(Enrichment Factor EF = 6.6), Cu (EF = 5.5), Pb (EF = 5.0), P (EF = 4.9), Zn (EF = 4.6),
Mn (EF = 3.4) und Ca (EF = 1.9) auf. In den oberen Sedimentschichten kommt es zu
einer Akkumulation der Spurenelemente, während ihre Konzentration mit zunehmender
Tiefe abnimmt. Die jährliche Akkumulationsrate von Cu, Mn, Pb und Zn in den
-1Sedimenten in der Nähe der Abwasserzuleitung beträgt 1.6, 16.4, 2.3 and 4.7ppm y .
Die Deltasedimente sind nach der Klassifikation von SHEPARD (1954) ein schluffiger
Ton, die zu 59.6% aus Tonmineralen und 21.5% aus Quarz bestehen. Plagioklas macht
5.4 % aus und die restlichen 13.5% setzen sich aus weniger häufig vorkommenden
Mineralen zusammen (Kalim-Feldspate, Amphibole, Pyroxene, Biotit, Granat, Epidot,
Kalzit, Apatit, magnetische Minerale wie Fe- und Ti-Oxiden, Gips und Halit). Es lassen
sich zwei Gruppen von Mineralen aufgrund ihrer mineralogischen Zusammensetzung
unterscheiden: natürliche (geogene) Phasen und anthropogene/geogene Phasen. Die
natürlichen Mineralphasen beinhalten Quarz, Tonminerale, Plagioklas, Kalium-Feldspat,
Pyroxene, Amphibole, Biotit, Granat und Epidot, die anthropogenen Mineralphasen
Kalzit, Apatit, magnetische Minerale, Gips und Halit.
III
Dünnschliffanalysen zeigen, dass die anthropogenen Partikel in den oberflächennahen
Bodenproben enthalten sind. Diese Partikel wurden händisch angereichert (ausgelesen),
ihre Menge geschätzt und mit SEM/EDX analysiert. Sie wurden unterteilt in magnetische
und nichtmagnetische (runde und eckige) Partikel.
Bei Böden von landwirtschaftlichen Nutzflächen erfolgt die Zufuhr von anthropogenen
Partikeln durch Holz- und Strohverbrennung, Düngung und andere landwirtschaftliche
Tätigkeiten.
In Industriegebieten sind die Quellen der anthropogenen Partikel chemische Industrien,
Ziegeleien und Abgase.
Urbane Bereiche in der Nähe von Industrien sind deutlich von Industrieabgasen
betroffen, besonders diejenigen, die in der Hauptwindrichtung (Südost) liegen. Der
Verkehr stellt eine zusätzliche Quelle der anthropogenen Partikel dar.
Zwei Diagramme zur Verteilungsdichte (Drahtgitterkarten) wurden mit Hilfe der
magnetischen Eigenschaften der Partikel in den oberflächennahen Bodenschichten
(magnetische spherules pro Gramm und magnetische Suszeptibilität) erstellt. Sie zeigen,
dass Partikel aus den industriellen Zonen bis zu 16 km durch Wind (hauptsächlich in
südöstliche Richtung) transportiert werden können. In Gewerbegebieten ist die maximale
Transportdistanz mit 4.8 km deutlich geringer.

Die geochemische Analyse unterteilt die untersuchten Elemente in 2 Gruppen, basierend
auf statistischen Analysen (Korrelationskoeffizient und Cluster-Analyse) und
Anreicherungsfaktoren. Die erste Gruppe enthält die Elemente Fe, Co, Cr, Ni and V, die
überwiegend einen natürlichen Ursprung haben und deren Vorkommen durch die
Verteilung der Tonminerale bestimmt wird. Die zweite Gruppe ist anthropogenen
Ursprungs und lässt sich nach der Landnutzung in folgende Gruppen klassifizieren:
Elemente, die durch industrielle Aktivitäten verbreitet werden (As, Ca, Cu, Ba, Cu, Pb, P
und Zn), Elemente, die durch Abgase verbreitet werden (Pb, Zn und Cu) und Elemente,
die durch landwirtschaftliche Aktivitäten (Düngung, Bewässerung) verbreitet werden
(As, P, Ca, Cu und Pb). Die Elementkonzentrationen zeigen eine negative Korrelation mit
der Korngröße der Sedimente. Die Schwermetallkonzentration (As, Cu, Pb und Zn) im
Untersuchungsgebiet ist unterhalb des zulässigen Grenzwertes, und es gibt keine
Hinweise auf eine vertikale Verteilung und somit eine Auswaschung der Elemente.
Regionen mit hohen Konzentrationen von natürlichen Elementen weisen Anomalien in
den Isolinienlkarten auf. Die Profilkarten basieren auf den magnetischen
Bodeneigenschaften und der chemischen Zusammensetzung der anthropogenen Partikel.
Somit zeigen diese Ergebnisse, dass magnetische Bodeneigenschaften geeignet sind, um
Bodenkontaminationen anzuzeigen.
Die vorliegende Studie liefert Basisdaten für ein besseres Verständnis der
Zusammensetzung und Verteilung der Kontaminationen und ihre Auswirkungen auf
benachbarte Regionen. Zusätzlich ist es zum ersten Mal möglich, mit Hilfe verschiedener
unabhängiger geologischer Untersuchungen den ökologischen Zustand der Region
abzuschätzen.
Abschließend werden Empfehlungen ausgesprochen, wie sich negative anthropogene
Einflüsse verringern lassen. In Regionen, in denen der äolische Transport anthropogener
Partikel die Hauptverunreinigungsquelle ist, sollte die Luftqualität kontrolliert werden,
Bewässerung sollte nicht mit ungenügend gereinigtem Abwasser erfolgen und
industrielles Abwasser nicht in den Nil, die wichtigste Süßwasserquelle, geleitet werden.

IV

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin