La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Johannes Fink

De
147 pages
Characterization of the ImagingPerformance of the SimultaneouslyCounting and Integrating X-ray DetectorCIXDissertationzurErlangung des Doktorgrades (Dr. rer. nat.)derMathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakult atderRheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universit at Bonnvorgelegt vonJohannes FinkausNeuwiedBonn 2009Angefertigt mit Genehmigung der Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakult at derRheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universit at Bonn1. Referent: Prof. Dr. N. Wermes2. Referent: Prof. Dr. H. Schmieden.Tag der Promotion: 23.10.2009Erscheinungsjahr: 2010AbstractThe CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-rayimaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counteras well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range ofmore than ve orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the averagephoton energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfullyconnected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested withrespect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating conceptunder X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic bene ts of theCIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signalprocessing concepts o er valuable insights into material related e ects like polarization andtemporal response.
Voir plus Voir moins

Characterization of the Imaging
Performance of the Simultaneously
Counting and Integrating X-ray Detector
CIX
Dissertation
zur
Erlangung des Doktorgrades (Dr. rer. nat.)
der
Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakult at
der
Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universit at Bonn
vorgelegt von
Johannes Fink
aus
Neuwied
Bonn 2009Angefertigt mit Genehmigung der Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakult at der
Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universit at Bonn
1. Referent: Prof. Dr. N. Wermes
2. Referent: Prof. Dr. H. Schmieden.
Tag der Promotion: 23.10.2009
Erscheinungsjahr: 2010Abstract
The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray
imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter
as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of
more than ve orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average
photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully
connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with
respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept
under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic bene ts of the
CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal
processing concepts o er valuable insights into material related e ects like polarization and
temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling e ects like charge-sharing, Compton
scattering and X-ray uorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements.Contents
1. Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5
2. X-ray imaging : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 7
2.1 Fundamental principles of medical X-ray imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.1.1 Photoelectric e ect and X-ray uorescence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.1.2 Compton scattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2 Medical X-ray imaging techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2.1 Projection radiography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2.2 Computed tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.3 X-ray detector concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.4 Signal formation in direct converting pixel detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.5 Direct converting sensor materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.5.1 Silicon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.5.2 CdTe and CdZnTe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.6 Additional considerations for hybrid pixel detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3. CIX 0.2 detector : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 29
3.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2 CIX 0.2 ASIC speci cations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.3 CIX 0.2 pixel cell concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.3.1 Photon counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.3.2 Integrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.3.3 Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.3.4 Static leakage current compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.3.5 Dynamic leakage current compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.3.6 Issues with the leakage current compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.4 CIX 0.2 modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.4.1 Sensor overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.4.2 Module assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.4.3 Module overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
3.5 Chip periphery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4. ASIC performance - Electrical tests on bumped CIX 0.2 modules : : : : : : : 49
4.1 Measurement conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.2 Calibration of the charge injection circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.2.1 Current chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.2.2 Bipolar switched capacitance chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.2.3 Other charge injection circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3 Dynamic range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.1 Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.2 Integrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594.4 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.4.1 Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.4.2 Integrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
5. CIX X-ray test setup : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 67
5.1 X-ray tube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2 X-Y stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.3 Mechanical chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
6. Sensor material characterization : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 71
6.1 Leakage current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.1.1 Bias dependence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.1.2 Temperature dependence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
6.1.3 Photon ux dep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
6.2 Temporal response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
6.2.1 Long-term response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
6.2.2 Short-term response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
6.2.3 Concluding remarks on the temporal response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
6.3 Module homogeneity and lateral polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
6.3.1 Potential chip-based inhomogeneities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
6.3.2 Sensor-based inhomogeneities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.4 Spectroscopic performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
2416.4.1 Am spectra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.4.2 Charge collection e ciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.4.3 Tube spectra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
7. CIX module performance under X-ray irradiation : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 97
7.1 Dynamic range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
7.1.1 Counter dynamic range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
7.1.2 Integrator range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
7.2 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
7.2.1 Counter noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
7.2.2 Integrator noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
7.2.3 Noise correlations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
7.3 Average photon energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
8. X-ray images : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 117
8.1 Raw data and at eld corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
8.2 Beam hardening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
8.3 Oversampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
8.4 Average photon energy and contrast enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
9. Conclusion and outlook : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 127
9.1 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
9.2 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Appendix 131
A. Di erential current logic : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 1333
B. CIX 0.2 readout : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 135
C. Threshold scans and tuning : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 137
Bibliography : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 139
Acknowledgements : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 14241. Introduction
In high energy physics pixellated semiconductor detectors have evolved into a standard
tool for the reconstruction of particle tracks. Owing to the small physical dimensions of
1the detector’s pixel cells, these detectors o er very high position resolutions. However, as
standard high energy physics particle detectors are equipped with Si sensors, they su er
from a low X-ray absorption probability. Thus, alternative sensor materials are required
in order to transfer the pixel detector concept into X-ray detection. In order to overcome
this limitation, highly X-ray absorbing sensor materials like CdTe and CdZnTe are under
research since the mid 1970’s. Still, only recent years have seen a large increase in the
availability as well as the material quality of these sensors, such that CdTe or CdZnTe
based detectors can be realized.
Against this background, a new detector concept for medical X-ray imaging has been de-
veloped in a joint research e ort by the University of Bonn, the University of Heidelberg
and the Philips Research Laboratories Aachen. The main feature of this detector is that
it combines two, currently alternatively used, signal processing concepts in every pixel
cell. So far medical X-ray detectors have either integrated the photon ux or counted
individual photons. The Counting and Integrating X-ray detector CIX applies both con-
cepts simultaneously and is thereby able to draw upon the strengths of both concepts,
while at the same time balancing their individual weaknesses. For example, CIX o ers
a larger dynamic range than conventional counting or integrating only detectors and it
furthermore pro ts from the fact that it takes both measurements on one X-ray beam.
These two simultaneous measurements allow a determination of the average photon energy
of the recorded spectrum and therefore give a direct handle of the changes in the X-ray
spectrum introduced by the imaged object.
After the electrical performance of the second generation CIX ASIC had been character-
ized in a di erent work [1], the aims of this work were the assembly of a full CIX X-ray
detector and the assessment of the potential benets of the simultaneously counting and
integrating concept in combination with di erent Cd-based sensor materials. For this, a
number of CIX ASICs were out tted with semiconductor sensors. These modules were
quali ed with respect to the in uence of the sensor on the electrical performance of the
system, the quality of the semiconductor sensors and nally the imaging performance of
the detector under X-ray irradiation.
1
"picture element"

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin