Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

How relational is self-evaluation? [Elektronische Ressource] : self-esteem and social relationships across life span and family situations / vorgelegt von Jenny Wagner

De
249 pages
How relational is self‐evaluation? Self‐esteem and social relationships across life span and family situations       Inaugural‐Dissertation in der Philosophischen Fakultät und Fachbereich Theologie der Friedrich‐Alexander‐Universität Erlangen‐Nürnberg  vorgelegt von Jenny Wagner  aus Leipzig  D 29                      Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 28.05.2009   Dekan:  Universitätsprofessor Dr. Jens Kulenkampff Erstgutachter:  Dr. Frieder R. Lang Zweitgutachter:  Dr. Karen L. Fingerman            Acknowledgement First of all I would like to thank my supervisor Prof. Dr. Frieder R. Lang for his support and his inspiring scientific expertise that helped greatly to extend my knowledge. His advice was always challenging and improving this dissertation. Secondly, I am very grateful to Prof. Karen L. Fingerman for the opportunity to work in her lab, where she took much time to exchange ideas and discuss my dissertation, opening up new perspectives. This  dissertation  is  part  of  the  project  “Personality  and  Relationship  Regulation across Adulthood”. My special thanks go to the German Research Foundation for funding and to Prof. Franz J. Neyer and Dr. Cornelia Wrzus, who never were short of helpful in‐sights. I deeply appreciate how much effort and thought Cornelia dedicated to this collabora‐tion.
Voir plus Voir moins

How relational is self‐evaluation? 
Self‐esteem and social relationships across 
life span and family situations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inaugural‐Dissertation 
in der Philosophischen Fakultät und Fachbereich Theologie 
der Friedrich‐Alexander‐Universität 
Erlangen‐Nürnberg 
 
vorgelegt von 
Jenny Wagner 
 
aus 
Leipzig 
 
D 29 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 28.05.2009 
 
 
Dekan:  Universitätsprofessor Dr. Jens Kulenkampff 
Erstgutachter:  Dr. Frieder R. Lang 
Zweitgutachter:  Dr. Karen L. Fingerman  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Acknowledgement 
First of all I would like to thank my supervisor Prof. Dr. Frieder R. Lang for his support and 
his inspiring scientific expertise that helped greatly to extend my knowledge. His advice was 
always challenging and improving this dissertation. 
Secondly, I am very grateful to Prof. Karen L. Fingerman for the opportunity to work 
in her lab, where she took much time to exchange ideas and discuss my dissertation, opening 
up new perspectives. 
This  dissertation  is  part  of  the  project  “Personality  and  Relationship  Regulation 
across Adulthood”. My special thanks go to the German Research Foundation for funding 
and to Prof. Franz J. Neyer and Dr. Cornelia Wrzus, who never were short of helpful in‐
sights. I deeply appreciate how much effort and thought Cornelia dedicated to this collabora‐
tion. She became a fundamental part of my scientific and personal life. 
A great many more people have contributed in important ways to this dissertation, 
and I am very grateful to all of them: my colleagues and the lab of Prof. Fingerman whose 
suggestions and criticism improved the work’s quality, the students in Halle and Erlangen 
that helped to collect the data, and Lindsay Pitzer and Florence W. Jones for proofreading 
the dissertation. Many special thanks go to Margund Rohr, who has always valuable com‐
ments, helps out at all times, and manages to be a scientific sparring‐partner and a friend. 
Very warm thanks go to my parents and family for their interest in what I do and for 
sharing their always highly regarded opinions with me; and to Toralf for everything. 
 Table of Contents    iv 
TABLE OFCONTENTS
1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................ 1
2 ACTIVE SELF: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SELF‐ESTEEM ............................................................. 7
2.1 Self‐Evaluation: Maintaining a Positive Appraisal of the Self .......................................... 7
2.2 Self‐Esteem – The Construct .................................................................................................. 8
2.3 Relational Self‐Esteem: Relationship Specific Evaluations of the Self ........................... 15
2.4 Summary ................................................................................................................................ 18
3 SOCIAL TIES AND RELATIONSHIP REGULATION: PERSONAL NETWORKS IN 
DIFFERENT CONTEXTS ........................................................................................................... 19
3.1 Two Perspectives on Social Relationships ......................................................................... 21
3.2 Integrative Framework of Lifelong Relationship Regulation: Contextual and 
Relationship Effects ............................................................................................................... 24
3.3 Adult Child‐Parent Ties: Relationship Regulation and Self‐Evaluation in the 
Family of Origin .................................................................................................................... 35
3.3.1 Closeness and Reciprocity in Adult Child‐Parent Relationships................ 35
3.3.2 Self‐Esteem as Regulatory Relationship Outcome ........................................ 37
3.3.3 Effects of Contextual Characteristics: Family Constancy ............................. 38
3.4 Childless Couples in Middle Adulthood: Relationship Regulation and Self‐
Evaluation in Different Family Situations ......................................................................... 40
3.4.1 Predictors and Differentiation of Fertility Behaviors.................................... 43
3.4.2 Motivated and Involuntary Childlessness: The Two Observed 
Conditions ........................................................................................................... 45
3.5 Summary ................................................................................................................................ 51
4 SELF‐EVALUATION ACROSS RELATIONAL CONTEXTS: GENERAL SUMMARY AND 
RESEARCH QUESTIONS .......................................................................................................... 52 Table of Contents   v 
5 METHOD .................................................................................................................................. 57
5.1 Online Study: Relational Self‐esteem across the Life Span ............................................. 57
5.1.1 Sample Descriptions of Online Study ............................................................. 58
5.1.2 Measures of Online Study ................................................................................ 59
5.2 Family Study: Personality and Social Relationships in the Family Context ................. 69
5.2.1 Target Sample: Description of Individuals and Couples ............................. 71
5.2.2 Measures of Target Sample .............................................................................. 76
5.2.3 Intergenerational Relations: Adult Children and Their Parents ................. 81
5.2.4 Measures on Intergenerational Relationships ............................................... 84
5.3 Procedures and Methods of Statistical Analyses .............................................................. 86
5.3.1 Data Structures ................................................................................................... 87
5.3.2 Statistical Software Packages ........................................................................... 92
6 RESULTS .................................................................................................................................. 93
6.1 Self‐Esteem across Life Span and Family Situations ........................................................ 93
6.1.1 Online Study: Effects of Age on Self‐Esteem ................................................. 93
6.1.2 Family Study: Effects of Family Situations on Self‐Esteem ....................... 103
6.1.3 Summary: Self‐Esteem across Life Span and Family Situations ............... 107
6.2 Social Networks and Relationship Regulation across Life Span and Family 
Situations .............................................................................................................................. 107
6.2.1 Online Study: Effects of Age on Social Networks and Relationship 
Regulation ......................................................................................................... 108
6.2.2 Family Study: Effects of Family Situation on Social Relationships .......... 115
6.2.3 Summary: Social Networks and Relationship Regulation across Life 
Span and Family Situations ............................................................................ 126
6.3 Functionality of Relationships – Relational and Individual Self‐Evaluation .............. 127
6.3.1 Online Study: Relational Self‐Esteem in Social Networks ......................... 127
6.3.2 Family Study: Self‐Evaluation in Adult Child‐Parent Ties ........................ 141
6.3.3 Family Study: Self‐ in Romantic Partnerships .......................... 154
6.3.4 Summary: Functionality of Relationships – Relational and Individual 
Self‐Evaluation ................................................................................................. 159
6.4 Summary of Findings in Relation to Hypotheses ........................................................... 161 Table of Contents   vi 
7 DISCUSSION .......................................................................................................................... 163
7.1 Different Facets of Self‐Evaluation across Life Span and Family Situations .............. 163
7.2 Social Networks and Relationship Regulation Characteristics: Differential 
Patterns Pertaining to Age Group and Family Situation ............................................... 169
7.3 Social Relationships Differentially Affect Self‐Evaluation across the Life Span 
and in Specific Relationship Dyads .................................................................................. 175
7.3.1 Calibration of Relational Self‐Esteem ........................................................... 175
7.3.2 Relationship Quality and Relational Self‐Esteem........................................ 176
7.3.3 Effects of Level of Data:  and Individual Self‐Esteem. .............. 177
7.3.4 Self‐Evaluation in Specific Dyadic Relationship Contexts ......................... 179
7.4 There Is a Relational Nature to Self‐Evaluation – But That Is Not the Whole 
Story ...................................................................................................................................... 182
7.5 Motivated and Involuntary Childlessness – Differentiation versus Convergence 
in Reproduction and Post‐Reproduction Times ............................................................. 184
7.6 Limitations of the Study ..................................................................................................... 187
7.7 Outlook ................................................................................................................................. 190
8 REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................... 193
9 APPENDIX  9‐1
 Index of Tables    vii 
INDEXOFTABLES
Table 3.1 Research Summary on Motivated andInvoluntary Childlessness .................... 48
Table 5.1   Applied Instruments of the Online Study .............................................................. 60
Table 5.2   Descriptive Statistics of Ego‐centered Social Networks Regarding the 
Entire Network and in Ten Relationship Categories ............................................ 62
Table 5.3   Variables of the Relationship Level – Item Characteristics of the Online 
Study ............................................................................................................................ 66
Table 5.4   Covariates – Scale Characteristics and Intercorrelations of Online Study 
(N = 557) ...................................................................................................................... 68
Table 5.5   Samples of Family Study .......................................................................................... 71
Table 5.6   Demographic Characteristics by Family Type ...................................................... 74
Table 5.7   Applied Instruments of the Family Study.............................................................. 76
Table 5.8   Descriptive Statistics of Entire Ego‐centered Social Networks and 
Composition in Eleven Different Relationship Types .......................................... 78
Table 5.9   Variables of the Relationship Level – Item Characteristics of the Family 
Study (N = 4561) ......................................................................................................... 79
Table 5.10   Covariates – Scale Characteristics and Intercorrelations of the Family 
Study (N = 342) ........................................................................................................... 80
Table 5.11   Descriptive statistics, Internal Consistencies, Inter‐Correlations, and 
Dyadic Similarity in Key Variables ......................................................................... 85
Table 6.1   Means, Standard Deviations, and Effect Sizes (ES) of Global Trait and 
Domain‐Specific State Self‐Esteem Measures by Gender, Partnership 
Status, Parental Status, and across Age Groups .................................................... 95
Table 6.2   Age Specific Intercorrelations between Global Trait and Domain‐Specific 
State Self‐Esteem Measures ...................................................................................... 98
Table 6.3   Regression of Age and Two Indicators of Well‐Being on Trait and State 
Self‐Esteem Measures .............................................................................................. 101
Table 6.4   Means, Standard Deviations, and Effect Sizes (ES) of Global Trait and 
Domain‐Specific State Self‐esteem Measures by Gender, Partnership 
Status, Parental Status, Family Constancy and Family Situations in the 
Follow‐Up Sample (N = 175) .................................................................................. 105
Table 6.5   Descriptive Statistics of Ego‐Centered Social Networks by Age Groups ........ 109
Table 6.6   Parameter Estimates (PE) of Relationship Measurement Two‐Level 
Regression Model on Perceived Closeness to Social Network Partners in 
Five Different Age Groups ..................................................................................... 114 Index of Tables   viii 
Table 6.7 Differences between Familial Situations in Average Number of Overall 
Size of Social Networks as well as in Specific Relationship Types ................... 117
Table 6.8 Differences between Family Types in Characteristics of Social Network 
Partners ..................................................................................................................... 119
Table 6.9   Parameter Estimates (PE) of Relationship Measurement Two‐Level 
Regression Model on Perceived Closeness to Social Network Partners in 
Four Different Familial Situations ......................................................................... 124
Table 6.10   Parameter Estimates (PE) of Multilevel Model on Perceived Communal‐
Esteem to Social Network Partners in Three Relationship Systems ................. 131
Table 6.11   Parameter Estimates (PE) of Multilevel Model on Perceived Communal‐
Esteem to Social Network Partners in Different Age groups in Kin and 
Non‐Kin Relationships ............................................................................................ 133
Table 6.12   Parameter Estimates (PE) and Odds Ratios (OR) of HGLM on Perceived 
Mutual‐esteem to Social Network Partners in Three Relationship 
Systems ...................................................................................................................... 135
Table 6.13   Parameter Estimates (PE) of Multilevel Model on Perceived Communal‐
Esteem to Social Network Partners in Three Relationship Systems with 
Cross Level Effects with Trait and State Self‐Esteem, Life Satisfaction 
and Subjective Health ............................................................................................. 138
Table 6.14   Descriptive Statistics of Relationship Specific Qualities to Parent and 
Aggregated Grand Means of Closeness and Reciprocity for Adult Child ...... 143
Table 6.15   Descriptive Statistics of Relationship Specific Qualities to Adult Child 
and Aggregated Grand Means of Closeness and Reciprocity for Old 
Parent ......................................................................................................................... 144
Table 6.16   Standardized Regression Coefficients Indicating the Effect of 
Generation, Family Constancy, Grand‐Mean Variable of Respective 
Outcome, and Gender on Perceived Closeness and Reciprocity in 
Intergenerational Relations .................................................................................... 147
Table 6.17   Standardized Parameter Estimates of Actor‐Partner Interdependence 
Models of Closeness and Reciprocity Regressed on Global Self‐Esteem in 
Adult Child ‐ Parent Dyads  150
Table 6.18   Descriptive Statistics of Relationship Perceptions in the Couple Sub‐
Sample at T1 and T2 (N = 52 couples) ................................................................... 155
Table 6.19   Descriptive Statistics of Self‐Esteem Measures in the Couple Sub‐Sample 
at T1 and T2 (N = 52 couples) ................................................................................. 156
Table 6.20   Summary of Results................................................................................................. 161 Index of Figures    ix 
INDEXOFFIGURES
Figure 1. Mean level trajectory of self‐esteem, forthetotal sample as well as 
separately for males and females (pictured results extracted from Robins 
et al., 2002, p. 429) ...................................................................................................... 10
Figure 3.   Proportion of Childlessness in Women in Germany (Table is based on 
Data of the Statistisches Bundesamt [Federal Agency of Statistics], 
2007b) ........................................................................................................................... 42
Figure 4.   The Actor‐Partner Interdependence Model (APIM, Based on Cook & 
Kenny, 2005, p. 102). Child = Person A; Parent = Person B; UC = Residual 
(Unexplained) Proportion of Child; UP = Residual (Unexplained) 
Proportion of Parent .................................................................................................. 88
Figure 5.   Trajectories of Cross‐Sectional Data on Global Trait Self‐Esteem as well 
as Performance and Social State Self‐Esteem across Seven Age Groups ........... 96
Figure 6.   Interaction Plotted From Life Satisfaction and Age Regressed on Global 
Self‐Esteem (Regarding Both Predictors ʹHighʹ and ʹLowʹ Is Based on +/‐ 
1 SD) ........................................................................................................................... 100
Figure 7.   Differences in Social Self‐Esteem by Family Constancy and Gender ............... 106
Figure 8.   Mean Perceived Emotional Closeness as a Function of Genetic 
Relatedness and Perceived Under‐ and Over‐Benefit in Social Networks ...... 123
Figure 9.   Mean Perceived Emotional Closeness To Non‐Kin (left) and Kin (right) 
as a Function of Perceived Under‐ and Over‐Benefit in Ego‐Centered 
Social Networks among Four Family Situations ................................................. 125
Figure 10.   Group Differences in Relationship Perceptions by Generation of Adult 
Children and Old Parents ....................................................................................... 146
Figure 11.   Standardized Parameter Estimates of Path Analysis Predicting 
Closeness, Reciprocity, and Self‐esteem at Follow‐up in High and Low 
Family Constancy .................................................................................................... 153
Figure 12.   Standardized Parameter Estimates of Path Analysis Predicting 
Closeness, Reciprocity, and Global Self‐Esteem at Follow‐up in 
Romantic Partnerships ............................................................................................ 158
 
 Abstract   x 
ABSTRACT 
The present research aims at three issues: (1) exploration of different self‐esteem 
measures with respect to age related patterns and contextual sensitivity, (2) consid‐
eration of structural and procedural issues of social networks and regulative mecha‐
nisms in the context of age and family situation, and (3) examination of relational 
self‐evaluation across networks, in intergenerational ties and romantic partnerships. 
The research is based on two studies with independent samples. Study 1 includes a 
cross‐sectional online sample of 562 people (age 17 to 88 years), who completed a 
network‐ and self‐esteem questionnaire. Study 2 is based on a quasi‐experimental 
study of 342 adults (age 30 to 45 years) with different family forms (e.g., motivated 
childless, traditional family). This study explores effects of family situation and pa‐
renthood status on social embeddedness and self‐evaluation. Investigations focus on 
ego‐centered social networks, global and domain‐specific self‐esteem as well as a 
new construct of relationship functioning, that is, relational self‐esteem. Findings 
suggest differential age‐related pathways and patterns of associations between global 
and domain‐specific self‐esteem. Social self‐esteem indicates a particular sensitivity 
to reflect contextual differences of family forms. Considerations of networks and re‐
gulative strategies support differential structures of kinship orientation across age 
groups and family situations. Regulation of over‐ and under‐benefit indicates lack of 
distinctiveness. Results on relational self‐esteem support a differential esteem of rela‐
tionship partners, with perceptions of closeness and reciprocity serving as predictive 
variables. Patterns of dyadic analyses show substantial effects of closeness on self‐
esteem in intergenerational ties and of reciprocity in spousal relations. Contextual 
effects were less distinctive than expected. In accordance with relational self‐esteem, 
findings point to a relational nature of self‐evaluation. The differential and relation‐
ship specific perspective opens up a new perspective of personal functioning across 
the life span. 
 
Words count: 286 

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin