Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

De
10 pages
Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major -BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti- Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus ), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.
Voir plus Voir moins
Carriónet al.Parasites & Vectors2011,4:150 http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/4/1/150
R E S E A R C H
Leishmania infantum HSP70IInull mutant candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation * Javier Carrión, Cristina Folgueira, Manuel Soto, Manuel Fresno and Jose M Requena
Open Access
as
Abstract Background:Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results:In this study, we tested the ability of aLeishmania infantumdeletion mutant, lacking bothHSP70IIalleles (ΔHSP70II), to provide protection againstLeishmaniainfection in theL. majorBALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of antiLeishmaniaIgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown thatΔHSP70II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions:The results suggest that theΔHSP70II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.
Background Leishmaniasis is a vectorborne disease that is caused by the infection of protozoan parasites of the genusLeish mania. The extracellular promastigote forms ofLeishma niaare inoculated into humans (and other mammalian hosts) by sandflies (phlebotomine insects), after which the parasites undergo phagocytosis by macrophages and trans form to intracellular amastigotes. Clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis are particularly diverse [1], ranging from subclinical (unapparent infections) to visceral leishmania sis (VL), which is usually fatal when untreated. Other com mon forms of the disease are mucocutaneous (MCL), diffuse cutaneous (DCL) and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). The clinical outcomes depends upon a number of factors, including the species (and strain) of the parasite, as well as the hosts genetically determined immune responses. Thus,Leishmania majorand many otherLeish maniaspecies cause CL,Leishmania donovaniandLeish mania infantumare mainly associated with VL, whereas
* Correspondence: jmrequena@cbm.uam.es Centro de Biología MolecularSevero Ochoa(CSICUAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
MCL results after infection with parasites from theLeish mania braziliensiscomplex [2]. Leishmaniasis threatens 350 million people worldwide, mainly in developing countries. Annual incidence is esti mated at 2 million cases and the overall prevalence is 12 million people [3]. In developing and underdeveloped parts of the world, AIDS and other immunosuppressive syndromes add to the higher risk of leishmaniasis [4]. In spite of its incidence, leishmaniasis is a neglected disease. Current control strategies rely on reservoir and vector control and pharmacological drugs, but new treatment strategies are clearly needed [5]. Abundant clinical and experimental evidence indicates that leishmaniasis would be preventable by vaccination, but antileishmanial vac cines for human use have yet to be developed [610]. Effective vaccination against human CL has been prac ticed for centuries by deliberate inoculation of living organisms from the exudates of active lesions or, more recently, by the inoculation of culturedLeishmaniapro mastigotes (process known asleishmanization) [11]. The appearance of complications, i.e. developing of severe disease in some individuals, led to abandoning the
© 2011 Carrión et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin