La lecture en ligne est gratuite
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
Télécharger Lire

Structural and nutritional differences between climbers and their supporting trees in a montane rainforest in South-Ecuador [Elektronische Ressource] / Jörg Salzer

De
144 pages
Structural and nutritional differences between climbers and their supporting trees in a montane rainforest in South-Ecuador Dissertation Thesis Department of Systematic Botany and Ecology, University of Ulm Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades Dr. rer. nat an der Fakultät für Naturwissenschaften der Universität Ulm 2004 Dipl.-Biol. Jörg Salzer Amtierender Dekan: Prof. Dr. R. J. Behm 1. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Marian Kazda 2. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Kalko Vorgelegt am 01.10.2003 Tag der Promotion: 05.02.2004 CONTENTS Acknowledgments IV Summary V Zusammenfassung VII Resumen IX 1. Introduction 1 2. Material and Methods 10 2.1. Geographical location of the research area 10 2.2. Climatic conditions 11 2.3. Geology, geomorphology and soils 12 2.4. Vegetation 13 2.5. The investigation plots 15 2.5.1. Soil properties and vegetation types 16 2.6. Sampling procedure and processing of the plant material 20 2.6.1. Measuring leaf area index (LAI) and canopy gap fraction (DIFN) 21 2.6.2. Measuring relative photon flux density (PFD ) 22 rel2.6.3.
Voir plus Voir moins

Structural and nutritional differences
between climbers and their supporting
trees in a montane rainforest
in South-Ecuador

Dissertation Thesis





Department of Systematic Botany and Ecology, University of Ulm


Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades Dr. rer. nat
an der Fakultät für Naturwissenschaften der Universität Ulm










2004
Dipl.-Biol. Jörg Salzer


Amtierender Dekan: Prof. Dr. R. J. Behm

1. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Marian Kazda
2. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Kalko


Vorgelegt am 01.10.2003
Tag der Promotion: 05.02.2004

CONTENTS

Acknowledgments IV
Summary V
Zusammenfassung VII
Resumen IX
1. Introduction 1
2. Material and Methods 10
2.1. Geographical location of the research area 10
2.2. Climatic conditions 11
2.3. Geology, geomorphology and soils 12
2.4. Vegetation 13
2.5. The investigation plots 15
2.5.1. Soil properties and vegetation types 16
2.6. Sampling procedure and processing of the plant material 20
2.6.1. Measuring leaf area index (LAI) and canopy gap fraction (DIFN) 21
2.6.2. Measuring relative photon flux density (PFD ) 22 rel
2.6.3. Calculation of leaf area (LA) and leaf mass per unit area (LMA) 23
2.6.4. Kjeldahl digestion 24
2.6.5. Photometry of phosphorus 24
2.6.6. Atomic absorption spectrometry 25
2.6.7. Measurements of carbon content 25
2.7. Statistical interpretation 26
2.7.1. Description of the investigation plots 26
2.7.2. Control for associations between the two growth forms 26
2.7.3. Testing the differences between the two growth forms 26
2.7.4. Testing the differences between the investigation plots 27
2.7.5. Testing the influence of external factors on the plants 28
2.7.6. Grouping of all variables in a principal components analysis 28

3. Results 29
3.1. Environmental conditions on the investigated plots 29
3.2. Sampled specimens and the host/climber-relationship 34
3.2.1. Plant lists 34
3.2.2. Plant distribution among the plots 36
3.2.3. Associations between the two growth forms 37

3.3. The differences in structural and nutritional parameters 40
3.3.1. Differences between the growth forms 40
3.3.2. Differences between the investigated plots 43
3.3.3. Leaf parameter values of the investigated genera 49
3.4. Leaf parameters of the investigated genera 63
3.5. Synthesis of leaf parameters 69
3.5.1. Factor loadings of the PCA 69
3.5.2. Factor loadings according to the genera 71
3.6. Comparison of young and mature leaves 76
3.6.1. Collected leaf samples 76
3.6.2. Differences in LMA, N and N 77 mass area

4. Discussion 80
4.1. Plot selection 80
4.2. Associations between climbers and host plants 81
4.3. Differences in leaf structure and nutrient allocation 83
4.3.1. Reduction in leaf mass per unit area in the climbers 83
4.3.2. Leaf structure on different plots under changing light regimes 85
4.3.3. Nitrogen allocation and its role in photosynthesis 87
4.3.4. The other nutrients 93
4.3.5. The role of Aluminium 95
4.3.6. Classification derived by PCA 97
4.4. Comparison of young and mature leaves 98
4.5. Conclusions 102

5. Literature 104

Appendices A1
Appendix 1: Environmental conditions at the sample pairs A1
Appendix 2: Soil-pH and content of exchangeable element on the plots A3
Appendix 3: Complete dataset of all collected climber species A4
Appendix 4: Complete dataset of all collected supporter species A6
Appendix 5: Mature and young leaves dataset A8
Appendix 6: Mean leaf structure parameters A9
Appendix 7: Mean leaf element contents A9
Appendix 8: Mean leaf structure parameters among all plots A10
Appendix 9: Mean leaf element contents among all plots A11
Acknowledgements IV
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I want to express my acknowledgements to all who helped me with my work during the
past four years.
Firstly, I want to thank Prof. Dr. Marian Kazda for giving me the opportunity to conduct
my studies in several tropical countries, for guidance in every critical phase, and for the
free and trusty atmosphere he provided me in the Department of Systematic Botany and
Ecology. Not to forget his financial support during the whole time.
Secondly, I want to express my thanks to the co-referent Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Kalko, as she
showed so much interest in my work.
Without Prof. Dr. Sigrid Liede from the University of Bayreuth this work would not have
been possible. She asked me to help one of her PhD students in Ecuador and gave me
also the possibility to perform my own scientific program there. The study was included in
and partly financed by the DFG projects LI 496/11-1 and LI 496/11-2.
Research permit was given by the Instituto Ecuadoriano Forestal de Areas Naturales y
Vida Silvestre (INEFAN), and logistic help came from the Fundación Cinetífica San
Francisco (FCSF). Scientific counterpart in Ecuador was Ing. Zhoffre Aguirre.
I also want to thank Patricia Brtnik for translating the summary into spanish, Graciela
Hinze for her final reviews on the “resumen”, Dr. Iris Schmid, Philipp von Wrangell, Norbert
Gäng, Kordula Heinen and Gregoire Hummel for their ideas during the past years, Christel
Necker for her outstanding help in the laboratory, Steffen Matezki for determination of
most samples, and a long list of other people for their friendship and support – hopefully
they all know that they are mentioned.
Special thanks go out to Rita Schneider. She gave me not only substantial comments on
the manuscript, but also amounts of motivation and a place of peacefulness for my
mind in hard phases during the past months.
Finally, I want to mention my parents. They enabled me always to follow my way and
gave me all the support I needed so much. I just hope that my mother can see how
everything now has come to a great end. Summary V
SUMMARY
Climbing plants, like lianas, vines or root climbers, can be the dominating growth form
on several sites not only in tropical forests but also in other climatic zones. Climbers from a
wide range of plant families can be found especially on forest edges and treefall gaps.
The uneven distribution of this growth form was well investigated in the past years and
different reasons for that patchiness, like light demand, support quality and nutrient or
water availability were mentioned but not fully understood. Further research upon the
relationships between external parameters and climber abundance is necessary as
different types of mostly negative effects on the host trees were reported in many studies.
Knowledge about the climbers ecophysiology is mainly limited on transpiration and water
transport, but other physiological mechanisms that also determine the competitiveness of
a climbing plant and thereby its abundance are still poorly understood. The climbers fast
growth requires fast adaptability to changes in their surrounding conditions, such as
effective biochemical mechanisms within the plant, combined with low growth-cost and
high nutrient content. Former studies already indicated a good assignment of nitrogen
towards light harvesting under shade by low leaf mass per unit area (LMA) in the leaves of
climbers, accompanied by high leaf nitrogen contents. Aim of this study was to improve
the knowledge about the mechanisms that lead to different patterns in climber
abundance. Therefore basic data in high resolution were inquired about the nutritional
status of climber leaves compared with their supporting hosts along different
environmental conditions.
The study was performed in a primary montane rainforest in South-Ecuador along an
altitudinal gradient between 1930 m a.s.l. and 2700 m a.s.l., covering a wide range of
different forest types. On each of the 8 investigation plots 10 pairs of climbers and
supporting host plants were selected. Stand characteristics were investigated by
measuring LAI, DIFN and PFD below each sample pair and directly above them. The rel
single plots distinguished well in their crown closure and light availability, giving so the
possibility to achieve high resolution data about the different reactions of climbers and
their supporting trees towards changing conditions. Retarded nutrient turn-over in the soils
of the undisturbed plots on the investigation area, a varied mosaic of parent materials,
and therefore extremely patchy nutrient availability conditions can explain the uneven
abundance of climbers in the ECSF forest with its huge species and structural diversity.
Host tree preferences by climbers were tested but were not evident and did so not Summary VI
influence the further evaluation. Leaf samples from both growth forms were collected pair
wise and analysed for structural factors (LA, LMA, C, C ) and element contents (N , area mass
N , P, K, Ca, MG, Mn, Al). area
Results showed that investment in supporting tissues on leaf level was lower by the
climbers than that by their hosts. Climbers built smaller leaves with lower specific leaf
mass (LMA). The morphological structures were better adapted to the prevailing light
conditions than within the self supporting vegetation. Very economic allocation of
nutrients was expressed on leaf area basis (N ) by irradiance input optimised nitrogen area
contents. Variations in LMA and N values along the light gradient were remarkably area
lower within the climbers. With less investment per leaf area the climbers can achieve
comparable carbon gain as their hosts, which was confirmed by photosynthesis
measurements in another ecosystem. The efficient use of nutrient resources was also
evident for phosphorus and potassium, which enables the climbers not only to allocate
nutrients towards their shoot growth but also fast responses toward changes in their
environment. Several variables like e.g. PFD , LMA and N were combined to new rel area
factors in a principal components analysis. The percentage of explained variance by the
factors and the factor loadings of the single parameters were higher within the climbers,
and accordingly reflected their higher degree of adaptation. Comparing freshly
emerged with mature leaves, different allocation patterns of nitrogen between trees and
climbers confirmed the results. The climbers leaves were characterised by generally
higher leaf nitrogen concentrations than those of their supporters, but the evidence of a
delayed nitrogen flush into developing leaves might reduce herbivory pressure on the soft
climber leaves. Within the self supporting vegetation some Al-accumulators from the
family of Melastomataceae were found. Low numbers of large lianas might be a result of
less abilities to handle the acid soil conditions that lead to high concentrations of toxic
3+mobile aluminium (Al ).
The combination of several physiological and morphological traits in their leaves
enables the climbers to exploit sites that vary broadly in light and crown closure. But the
good adaptability of climbing plants is strongly demanding a sufficient nutrient supply,
which explains their high abundance on sites with increased nutrient availability. Zusammenfassung VII
ZUSAMMENFASSUNG
In den vielen Klimazonen dieser Erde, aber vor allem in den Tropen stellen Kletterpflan-
zen die lokal dominierende Wuchsform dar. Verschiedene Typen von Kletterpflanzen aus
ganz unterschiedlichen Familien finden sich in hoher Abundanz an Waldrändern oder -
lichtungen. Als Gründe für die ungleichmäßigen Verteilungsmuster der Kletterpflanzen
wurden hoher Lichtbedarf, Wasser- und Nährstoffverfügbarkeit sowie das Vorkommen und
die Qualität von Trägerstrukturen genannt, jedoch fehlt bislang ein umfassendes Ver-
ständnis für die Bedeutung dieser Faktoren. Weiterführende Untersuchungen auf diesem
Gebiet sind nötig, da der Einfluss der Kletterpflanzen auf die Trägerpflanzen in den meis-
ten Fällen stark negativ zu beurteilen ist. Ein Großteil der bisherigen Arbeiten über die Ö-
kophysiologie von Kletterpflanzen behandelt die Transpiration und den Saftfluss. Noch
mangelt es an Wissen darüber, inwiefern weitere physiologische Mechanismen die Kon-
kurrenzkraft und damit die Abundanz dieser Wuchsform beeinflussen. Kletterpflanzen müs-
sen aufgrund ihres schnellen Wachstums in der Lage sein sich an rasch wechselnde Um-
gebungsbedingungen anzupassen, was effektive biochemische Mechanismen innerhalb
der Pflanze erfordert. Die hierzu nötigen hohen Nährstoffgehalte sollten dennoch mit ge-
ringen Wuchskosten einhergehen. Dies wird durch eine geringe flächenbezogene Blatt-
masse (LMA) bei gleichzeitig hohem Stickstoffgehalt ermöglicht Ziel der vorliegenden Ar-
beit war es, die grundlegenden Mechanismen die zu den beschriebenen Verteilungsmus-
tern führen besser zu verstehen. Hochauflösende Daten entlang sich verändernder Um-
gebungsparameter über die Nährstoffgehalte in Blättern von Kletterpflanzen und ihren
Trägern wurden hierzu erfasst und miteinander verglichen.
Die Studie wurde in einem Bergregenwald in Südecuador durchgeführt. Entlang eines
Bergrückens zwischen 1930 und 2700 m ü. NN. wurden 8 Plots in verschiedenen Vegeta-
tionstypen eingerichtet. Jeweils 10 Träger-Kletterpflanze-Paare wurden markiert und ihre
Umgebungsbedingungen mit Hilfe von LAI, DIFN und PFD Messungen - zum einen unter rel
dem jeweiligen Pflanzenpaar, zum anderen unmittelbar über dem zu erntenden Zweig-
paar – bestimmt. Aufgrund der deutlichen Unterschiede die sich hierbei zwischen den
Flächen abzeichneten, war es möglich hochauflösende Informationen über die Reaktio-
nen beider Wuchsformen auf sich verändernde Umgebungsbedingungen zu erhalten.
Das ungleichmäßige Auftreten von Kletterpflanzen im Untersuchungsgebiet lässt sich auf
eine beschränkte Nährstoffmobilität in den Böden, einem Mosaik an Ausgangsgesteinen
und somit auf eine sehr ungleichmäßigen Nährstoffverfügbarkeit zurückführen. Präferen-Zusammenfassung VIII
zen einzelner Kletterpflanzengattungen für spezielle Trägerbäume wurden getestet, konn-
ten ausgeschlossen werden und beeinflussten somit die weitere Auswertung nicht. Nach
paarweiser Ernte wurden die Blätter beider Wuchsformen bezüglich ihrer strukturellen
Merkmale (LA, LMA, C, C ) und ihrer Nährstoffgehalte (N , N , P, K, Ca, MG, Mn, Al) area mass area
untersucht.
Die Kletterpflanzen zeigten deutlich geringere Investitionen in die Stützgewebe ihrer Blät-
ter mit geringerer LMA und LA (Blattfläche) als die Blättern der Trägerbäume. Die morpho-
logische Anpassung der Blätter an die Umgebungsbedingungen war innerhalb der Klet-
terpflanzen deutlicher als bei ihren Trägern. Hohe massenbezogene Blattstickstoffgehalte
ermöglichen hohe Wuchsraten bei den Kletterpflanzen. Zudem war eine ökonomische
Verteilung von Nährstoffen deutlich anhand des niedrigen flächenbezogenen Stickstoff-
gehaltes (N ) zu erkennen. Offensichtlich war N in den Blättern der Kletterpflanzen area area
besser an die jeweilige Lichtbedingung angepasst. Trotz geringerer Investition je Blattflä-
che können die Kletterpflanzen somit vergleichbare Kohlenstoffgewinne wie ihre Träger
erreichen, was durch Gaswechselmessungen in einem anderen Ökosystem bestätigt
wurde. Auch Phosphor und Kalium werden von den Kletterpflanzen sehr effizient für die
Anpassung an die jeweiligen Wuchsbedingungen genutzt. Mit Hilfe einer PCA wurden
mehrere Einzelvariablen, wie z.B. PFD , LMA und N zu neuen Faktoren zusammenge-rel area
führt. Höherer Anteil an erklärter Varianz und höhere Faktorenladungen bestätigten die
bessere Anpassungsfähigkeit von Kletterpflanzen. Auch ein Vergleich von voll ausgebilde-
ten und jungen Blättern beider Wuchsformen ergab ökonomisch sinnvolle Ergebnisse. Der
Blattstickstoffgehalt der Kletterpflanzen ist zwar generell hoch, jedoch schützt ein verzöger-
tes Einlagern in die sich noch entfaltenden weichen Blätter diese vermutlich vor Herbivo-
rie.
Die Kombination spezieller physiologischer und morphologischer Blatteigenschaften er-
laubt es den Kletterpflanzen Flächen zu besiedeln, welche sowohl im Lichtangebot als
auch anderer Ressourcen stark variieren. Die hohe Anpassungsfähigkeit bedingt allerdings
auch eine ausreichende Nährstoffversorgung. Dies wiederum kann die hohe Abundanz
bzw. das Fehlen von Kletterpflanzen auf einigen Flächen erklären. Resumen IX
RESUMEN
En muchas zonas climáticas, especialmente en los tropicos, las plantas trepadadoras,
como las lianas, son la vegetación dominante. Varios tipos de las plantas trepadoras de
diferentes familias se encuentran con alta abundancia en los límites del bosque o en los
claros del bosque. Como razón es posibles para la distribución irregular se discuten la
alta necesidad de luz, la existencia de agua y nutrición tanto como la calidad de las
plantas hospedantes, aunque falta todavía entender por completo el significado de
todo los factores involucrados. Investigaciones completamentarias en este campo son
necesarias, ya que el efecto y la influencia de las plantas trepadoras sobre la planta
hospedante en la mayoría de los casos son negativos. La mayoría de las investigaciones
sobre la ecophysiología de las plantas escaladores tratan de la transpiración y de la
circulación de liquidos. Todavía existe un déficit en el conocimiento de cómo otros
mecanismos physiológicos influyen la competición y así la abundancia de estas plantas.
Plantas trepadoras, por su crecimiento veloz, necesitan acostrumbarse rápidamente a
cambios de las condiciones de su ambiente. Esto requiere mecanismos bioquímicos
efectivos dentro de la planta. Por otro lado la alta necesidad nutritiva requerida debería
estar combinada con costos bajos en el crecimiento. Esto se logro mediante una baja
masa de hojas por unidad (LMA) y a mismo tiempo altas concentraciones de nitrógeno.
La finalidad de esta investigación ha sido mejorar el conocimiento de los mecanismos
conducen al patrón de distribución mencionado. Se han recolectados datos básicos de
alta resolución sobre el estado nutritivo de las plantas trepadoras en comparación con
el de sus plantas hospedantes, en diferentes condiciones ambientales.
El sitio de la investigación fué un bosque tropical montañoso en el Sur de Ecuador. Por
la cuesta de la montaña, entre 1930 y 2700 metros de altura sobre el nivel del mar,
fueron instalados 8 plots en diferentes tipos de vegetación. En cada plot fueren
seleccionadas 10 parejas de plantas hospedantes – plantas escaladoras y se
investigaron las características del lugar por mediciones de sus LAI, DIFN y PFD por rel
abajo y por arriba de las plantas. Los diferentes plots se distinguieron claramente en
quanta a densidad de vegetación y luz, dando asi datos resultantes de alta resolución
sobre las diferentes reacciones de las plantas trepadoras y sus hospedantes en
condiciones cambiantes. La abundancia irregular de las plantas escaladores en el área
del estudio se explica por la mobilidad limitada de la nutrición de los suelos, un mosaico
de material parental y así resulta una disponibilidad irregular de nutritivos. Preferencias

Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin