Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

The use of non-wood forest products by migrants in a new settlement: experiences of a Visayan community in Palawan, Philippines

De
13 pages
Migrants are often constrained by a lack of knowledge regarding their new environment and require new skills for their livelihood. In Palawan, some of these necessary skills and knowledge are related to the collection and use of non-wood forest products (NWFPs), many of which the migrants were previously not familiar with. The predominantly Visayan migrants have been successful in familiarizing themselves with the NWFPs in the surrounding forests, with assistance from some of the local indigenous people, in this case the Tagbanua, and from previous migrant settlers. The NWFPs they know about and the extent of use are presented. Currently, except for almaciga ( Agathis philippinensis Warb.) resin and house-building materials, NWFPs are considered as supplements to agricultural products, not as main source of either subsistence or income.
Voir plus Voir moins
Pga e 1fo1 (3apegum nr bet nor foaticnoitrup esopurnas)JoEthloflogoonibdtEynaicedomhnein
Abstract Migrants are often constrained by a lack of knowledge regarding their new environment and require new skills for their livelihood. In Palawan, some of these necessary skills and knowledge are related to the collection and use of non-wood forest products (NWFPs), many of which the migrants were previously not familiar with. The predominantly Visaya n migrants have been successful in familiarizing themse lves with the NWFPs in the surro unding forests, with assistance from some of the local indigenous people, in th is case the Tagbanua, and from previous migrant settlers. The NWFPs they know about and the extent of use are presented. Currently, except for almaciga ( Agathis philippinensis Warb.) resin and house-building materials, NWFPs are considered as supplements to agricultural products, not as main source of either subsistence or income.
Bio Med Central
Published: 07 September 2006 Received: 30 June 2006 Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 2006 2 :36 doi:10.1186/1746-4269-2-36 Accepted: 07 September 2006 , This article is available from: http ://www.ethnobiomed.com/content/2/1/36 © 2006 Lacuna-Richman; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the orig inal work is properly cited.
Address: Faculty of Forestry, University of Jo ensuu, P. O. Box 111, Joensuu- 80101, Finland Email: Celeste Lacuna-Richman* - c eleste.lacuna-richman@joensuu.fi * Corresponding author
Research Open Access The use of non-wood forest pr oducts by migrants in a new settlement: experiences of a Vi sayan community in Palawan, Philippines Celeste Lacuna-Richman*
Background the diversification from subsistence agriculture to other Palawan province, with a total area of almost 1.5 million income-generating work by second-generation settlers square hectares, has historically been one of the least pop- [4,5]. ulated islands in the Philippine archipelago due to endemic malaria and its historical function as the site of a Current attention to communities living in Palawan's for-leper community and a penal colony [1]. By the early ests tends to concentrate on the island's indigenous peo-Twentieth Century however, Palawan became known as a ple, which is necessary, as they have been marginalized by "frontier," where burgeoning populations from other the larger Philippine society for decades. However, the Philippine islands could form settlements and where the migrants to Palawan are also a vital part both of its past chance to own land was great. The end of the Second and its future development. The Human Development World War coincided with the government resettlement Report 2004 has discerned some trends in economic and of large numbers of people into Palawan [2]. Studies of political data regarding the movement of people around migration into Palawan have emphasized various aspects the world, both across national borders and in-country. of the migrant experience, including the sheer difficulty of Among them is the rejection of cultural determinism as a carving agricultural land from forest and the hunger that measure of economic performance and democracy, intui-comes before the first harvest [3]. Other aspects of the tively appealing as such beliefs may be. Another trend is migration into Palawan that have been examined include the increased political interest in "core values and traits" the role of kinship ties in easing the migration process and of people and culture, occurring just as anthropologists