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Ghost Moon

De
192 pages
In the second installment of the Desert Legends Trilogy, Ghost Moon follows young James Doolen's story after he discovers the terrible truth about his father in Written in Blood. The year is 1878, and young Jim is not yet ready to return to Canada. Instead he heads up to New Mexico in hopes of finding work and building a life. On the way he meets Bill Bonney (later to be known as Billy the Kid), who takes him to a ranch south of the town of Lincoln, where they both find work as cowboys. Little does Jim know that he is about to get caught up in a vicious battle for the lucrative army contracts with nearby Fort Stanton. As the violence explodes around him, Jim becomes a helpless witness to cold-blooded murder and watches as Bill swears revenge and leads a gang of killers into the hills. However hard he tries, Jim can't escape the violence and is finally drawn into its bloody conclusion on the streets of Lincoln.
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J O H N W I L S O N
ghost moon
Text copyright ©2011John Wilson All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system now known or to be invented, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication
Wilson, John ( John Alexander),1951Ghost moon [electronic resource] / John Wilson.
Electronic monograph in PDF format. Issued also in print format. isbn 9781554698806
I. Title. ps8595.i5834g55 2011a jc813'.54 c2011903512x
First published in the United States,2011Library of Congress Control Number:2011907455
Summary: In the late 1870s, young Jim Doolen travels to New Mexico, where he befriends Bill Bonney and ends up in the middle of the Lincoln County War.
Orca Book Publishers is dedicated to preserving the environment and has printed this book ® on paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council .
Orca Book Publishers gratefully acknowledges the support for its publishing programs provided by the following agencies: the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund and the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Province of British Columbia through the BC Arts Council and the Book Publishing Tax Credit.
Cover design by Teresa Bubela Cover photo by John Wilson Author photo by Katherine Gordon
orca book publishers po Box 5626,Stn. B Victoria,bc Canadav8r 6s4
orca book publishers po Box 468 Custer,wa usa 982400468
www.orcabook.com Printed and bound in Canada.
141312114321
For SHaun and Petra, wîtH tHanks or tHe many Aprîl vîsîts.
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t îs tîme or you to go, Busca. he gost moon ït’s mornîng, and Weîngton and ï are sîttîng îs u. on tIe edge outsîde îs cave eatîng a breakast o tortî-as and beans. A îgt breeze îs sendîng tîny wîrwînds o dust across te lat edge beore us. “Wat’s a gost moon? ï ask my od rîend. Weîngton waves îs arm în te dîrectîon o te pae, sîver gobe angîng în te wased-out bue sky above te dark brown îs to te east. “La luna, e says. “he moon îs te poor cousîn o te sun. Her job îs to brîgten te nîgt, but se’s jeaous o er rea-tîve wo gîves so muc îgt and warmt în te day.
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Every mont, te moon trîes as ard as se can to be as brîgt as er cousîn. Se amost succeeds, but te efort îs too muc and se ades away, ony to try once more te next mont. “Sometîmes, wen te moon îs u, se tînks tat tîs tîme se wî become as brîgt as er cousîn. Wen se îs arrogant îke tîs, te sun decîdes to teac er a esson and învîtes er to a competîtîon durîng te dayîgt. O course, te poor moon aways oses tîs competîtîon, as you see. Weîngton îndîcates te moon once more. “La luna del antasma, te gost moon. “ït does ook as î you can see troug ît, ï agree. “ït îs we to know one’s pace în te word, Busca. he moon as no pace în te day. ï’ve enjoyed my days wît Weîngton and Perdîdo, te mummîIed conquîstador wo sîts în my rîend’s cave, teîng te story o my adventures at Casas Grandes and îstenîng to îs storîes o scoutîng wît te army and escortîng Engîs unters. But e’s rîgt, gost moon or not, ît’s tîme or me to move on. Ater Casas Grandes, ï returned to Esqueda, were ï spent Crîstmas wît Santîago avîng my broken rîbs tended to by îs mad wîe, Marîa. ït was a wonderuy reaxîng tîme wît no danger and notîng to do but wrîte etters to my moter back în Yae and readMoby Dîck.
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However, by te tîrd week o January, ï was becomîng restess. ït was tîme to ead up to Lîncon and Ind work, and, on te way, keep my promîse to Weîngton to return and te îm ow my story turned out.ï sadded Coronado, and we retraced our route nort to Weîngton and Perdîdo’s cave. “ït îs tîme or me to go, ï agree wît Weîngton. My rîend nods. “You are a seeker, Busca. Now tat you ave dîscovered your ater, wat do you seek next? “ï’ ead over to Lîncon County. ï’ve eard tere’s work tere and money to be made. Weîngton snorts dîsparagîngy. “ïn my experîence, Busca, werever tere îs money to be made,apuro, troube aways oows cose beînd. “ï don’t mînd, ï say wît a srug. “ï want to earn about te word and ave adventures. “ï envy you your yout and entusîasm, but remember tîs, Busca: to earn rom your adventures, you must Irst survîve tem. You were ucky on te traî to Esqueda. Next tîme ît mîgt not be Na-kee-tats-an wo Inds you. My peope are restess. Many preer te ardsîps o îvîng ree în te mountaîns to acceptîng ood rom te government on te reservatîons. ï soud be sad to see your scap angîng rom a warrîor’s ance.
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ï begîn to protest tat ï’ be Ine, but Weîngton ods up îs and to stop me. “Do not argue wît me, e says wît a smîe. “ï know you wî do wat you must. Just as Perdîdo and ï dîd wen we were young men. Just as Na-kee-tats-an does today. Weîngton as sîent and stares at te moon. ï am about to coect my bedro and go and Ind Coronado, wen e stîrs. “Dîd you read te book ï gave you about te great wîte wae? ï’m a îtte bît taken aback by te questîon and esîtate or a moment beore answerîng. “ï read ît în Esqueda, ï say. “ït’s a good story. “ït’s a ong story. ï tînk your story îs îke tat. ït îs not Inîsed yet. ï ave no îdea were Weîngton îs goîng wît tîs, but ï know îm we enoug to know e as some poînt to make. ï sît în sîence and eventuay e contînues.“ï ave been avîng many dreams atey. You are în tem, and so îs Na-kee-tats-an. ï tînk te spîrîts are teîng me tat your utures are întertwîned. ï can’t îmagîne ow tey mîgt be. he ast tîme ï saw Na-kee-tats-an, e was eadîng east to joîn Vîctorîo. ï doubt very muc î e’ come to Lîncon. “But peraps tat îs not wat my dreams mean, Weîngton goes on. “ï am în tese dreams as we.
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ï sît wît Perdîdo în our cave. He tes me tat tîmes are cangîng and tat te word does not need od men îke us anymore. He says we must eave tîs pace and go our own ways. hen e gets up and goes out o te cave. ï oow îm, but e dîssoves to dust în te sunîgt. ï turn back, but my cave îs gone, repaced by a wîde paîn. On te paîn are a ake and a arge buîdîng o stone. ï tînk ît îs a caste îke te ones tat te Engîsman, Lord Ared George Cambrey Sommervîe, Ear o Canterbury, tod me about, but ît îs a ruîn. here îs a batte ragîng over te ruîns,but ï cannot see wo îs Igtîng. here are many bodîes on te ground and muc bood. A voîce în my ead tes me ï must eave tîs pace, but were am ï to go? ï wak away. “Wat does ît mean? Weîngton srugs. “No sé. ï do not know, but ï am certaîn tat ï must eave my cave. Am ï to accompany you to Lîncon? “ï don’t tînk so, ï say too urrîedy. ï’ve been ookîng orward to beîng on my own agaîn. Fond as ï am o Weîngton, ï can’t see me arrîvîng în Lîncon ookîng or work wît an aged Apace în tow. Weîngton surprîses me by augîng. “Your ace îs îke te page o a book, Busca. Yout does not wîs to
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be tetered to age. ï sa eave ere, but not wît you. Peraps ï am to go and Igt wît Na-kee-tats-an. Dîd you know tat e îs my son? “ï guessed rom takîng wît îm. But you’re too od to Igt, ï burt out rudey. Agaîn Weîngton augs. “Yout tînks îe ends wen te Irst wrînke appears on te skîn or te Irst ace troubes a joînt. You do not know Kas-tzîden, known to you wîte men as Nana? ï sake my ead. “You woud ave caed îm od wen e ougt wît Mangas Cooradas and Cocîse, and was marrîed to Geronîmo’s sîster. Now e îs oder even tan me. Some say e as seen more tan eîgty wînters. Yet e Igts aongsîde te young warrîors în te Sîerra Madre Mountaîns. Yout îs not everytîng. “ï’m sorry, ï say. “ï dîd not mean to însut you. “You do not însut me, Weîngton says, te smîe stî on îs ace. “But you cannot ep me înterpret my dreams. Do not worry. ï sa not troube you wît my company. And ï sa not run to te îs to Igt. Not yet. ï sa dream and sît by my cave, dîscussîng te word and wat ît means wît Perdîdo, untî tîngs become cear. You must oow your story and Ind your adventures. But take care. hese are troubed tîmes,
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