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Understanding Minimalist Syntax

De
192 pages
Understanding Minimalist Syntax introduces the logic of the Minimalist Program by analyzing well-known descriptive generalizations about long-distance dependencies.

  • An introduction to the logic of the minimalist program - arguably the most important branch of syntax
  • Proposes a new theory of how long-distance dependencies are formed, with implications for theories of locality, and the minimalist program as a whole
  • Introduces the logic of the minimalist program by analyzing well-known descriptive generalizations about long-distance dependencies, and asks why they should be true of natural languages
  • Rich in empirical coverage, which will be welcomed by experts in the field, yet accessible enough for students looking for an introduction to the minimalist program.
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Contents
Acknowledgments
1
2
3
Introductory Remarks 1.1 The Framework 1.2 Outline of the Book: Goals and Structure
The Marks of Successive Cyclicity (TheWhatQuestion) 2.1 Subjacency and the Emergence of Successive Cyclicity 2.2 The Evidence 2.2.1 Syntax 2.2.2 Morphology 2.2.3 Phonology 2.2.4 Semantics 2.2.5 Morpho-syntactic evidence from overtly stranded pieces 2.3 A-movement 2.4 Conclusion
The Distribution of Intermediate Landing Sites (TheWhereQuestion) 3.1 Punctuated vs. Uniform Paths 3.2 The Difficulties Faced by Punctuated Path Hypotheses 3.2.1 Phases: an overview 3.2.2 Conceptual arguments for phases
xi
1 1 4
9
9 11 11 14 22 23
26 29 34
39 40
43 44 46
viiiContents 3.2.3 Arguments against phases 3.2.4 Old problems for phases 3.2.5 No empirical argument for phases 3.3 Conclusion
4
5
6
The Timing of Intermediate Steps of Movement (TheWhenQuestion) 4.1 Early vs. Late Successive Cyclicity 4.2 Takahashi (1994) 4.3 The Evidence for Early Successive Cyclic Movement 4.3.1 Background information on applicatives 4.3.2 The need for early successive cyclic movement 4.4 Potential Arguments for Late Successive Cyclic Movement 4.4.1 Sub-extraction out of a moved element 4.4.2 Intervening traces 4.4.3 Object agreement 4.5 Conclusion
The Motivation for Intermediate Movement Steps (TheWhyQuestion) 5.1 Last Resort 5.2 Problematic Cases 5.2.1 Concord 5.2.2 Successive cyclicity 5.3 Anti-locality 5.4 Anti-locality and Successive Cyclicity 5.5 Anti-locality and Last Resort 5.6 TheWhy-Question 5.7 Conclusion
Alternative Views on Successive Cyclicity 6.1 TAG-based Accounts 6.2 An Agreement-based Account 6.3 Prolific Domains 6.4 Greed-based Approaches 6.5 Conclusion
48 50 54 61
64 64 66
70 71
76
80 80 82 83 86
90 90 91 91 92 101 106 110 113 117
119 119 125 129 129 132
7
8
Contentsix Successive Cyclicity and Other Aspects of Locality133 7.1 The Standard View on Islands 134 7.2 Puzzles for the Standard View 136 7.2.1 Movement, freezing, and escape hatch 136 7.2.2 Island by default? 137 7.2.3 Island-obviation 137 7.3 Ross’s View 145 7.4 Agreement and Islandhood 145 7.5 Conclusion 148
Concluding Remarks
References
Index
150
152
167