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Little Lean Guide for the Use of Managers

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120 pages
In a world of permanent crisis, where change is the norm, Lean becomes fashionable. Yet, companies who have chosen to fundamentally transform itself, following the Lean principles and investing first on women and men, have, globally, and in the long term, the best economic results. This book, with simple concepts and illustrated with many examples, analyzes the main misconceptions about Lean, taking each time the views of managers and operational concerned. (Version anglaise de Petit guide Lean à l'usage des managers).
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Cécile «Lean? Just common sense! Besides long
ago it is used without using the word.» ROCHE«Lean is doing more with less. It’s more
stress for everyone.» A little
In a world in permanent crisis, where change
is the norm, Lean becomes fashionable. It’s
quite fun for an approach that has over sixty
Cécile Roche is Lean Director years... But it’s also an opportunity to hear
of Thales Group. With a team a lot of misconceptions about it. Sometimes
of experts and a network it is adorned with all virtues, and sold as a
deployed around the world, LEANready-to-use wand, now it is accused of all
she builds, deploys and
evils, guilty of serving the very short-term supports the Lean approach for
fnancial interests. for all Thales Group, both for
Yet, companies who have chosen to production and engineering the use fundamentally transform it self, following the activities.
She is a member of the Lean principles and investing frst on women
Institut Lean France and and men, have, globally, and in the long term, ofGUIDEholds a Certifcate of the best economic results.
Studies Specialized in Lean But becoming lean, that’s another thing to
Management at Telecom
make (or worse, to delegate!) Lean.
ParisTech. She is also trained Managers
in executive coaching for
This book, with simple concepts and leaders (Alter & Coach).
illustrated with many examples, analyzes the After having a «classical»
main misconceptions about Lean, taking each electronics engineer and
technical manager path, she time the views of managers and operational
led several improvement concerned. It illuminates the point of view of
projects and was in charge diferent experts on the subject, by showing
of the management of the complementarities of these approaches.
several Technical Operations

Units. In this context, she
This is a simple and comprehensive began to implement lean
guide to understand Lean as an approach, management in 2006. She
beyond the use of the most popular, (or more has published numerous
mysterious) tools, decked out not always well- articles on Lean and
provides training.understood acronyms (5S, VSM, Kaizen...).
Foreword by
Jacques CHAIZE
Cover: Thinkstock
ISBN : 978-2-343-05918-1
9 782343 059181
13,50 €
Cécile ROCHE
A LITTLE LEAN GUIDE for the use of MANAG ers
Z
A LITTLE LEAN GUIDE
FOR THE USE OF MANAGERS

Collection Lean Management


Collection directed by Richard Kaminski
(Institut Lean France)
We can choose to succeed... if we find the right path to development:
everyone wants successful, pleasant, useful and affordable products. How
can we focus everyone's energies and initiatives to create innovative
products and services?
The promise that lean management makes is to combine satisfaction (of
customers, employees and partners) and growth (of the company and of
people).
This collection aims to recount field experience and observations made by
managing directors of companies who are engaged in real lean.


Cécile Roche
A LITTLE LEAN GUIDE
FOR THE USE OF MANAGERS
Foreword by Jacques Chaize
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WKWWSZZZKDUPDWWDQIUTo Monique and Daniel, who have always known that the important thing is learning
to learn.


CONTENTS
CONTENTS ......................................................................................................... 7
PREFACE ............................................................................................................. 9
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................... 11
LEAN ASSUMPTIONS ................................................................................... 13
THE PRINCIPLES OF LEAN ...................................................................... 19
LEAN IS A SYSTEM ....................................................................................... 25
A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY ....................................................................... 29
SOME REFERENCES .................................................................................... 31
THE MANAGERIAL PRINCIPLES OF LEAN ....................................... 35
MURI, MURA, MUDA: ................................................................................... 57
WASTE FROM THE LEAN PERSPECTIVE ........................................... 57
LEAN: CHOOSING ........................................................................................ 69
COMPETITIVENESS BY EXCELLENCE ............................................... 71
LEAN AND FINANCE .................................................................................. 73
RESULTS? .......................................................................................................... 81
SOME PITFALLS OF LEAN ........................................................................ 85
LEAN COACHES ............................................................................................ 89
LEAN: AN INDIVIDUAL ............................................................................. 93
FACTSHEETS: SOME .................................................................................... 97

FLOW MANAGEMENT ................................................................................ 99
VISUAL MANAGEMENT ........................................................................... 103
THE STRATEGY/FIELD ACTION LOOP ........................................... 104
PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION OF .................................................. 105
TO CONCLUDE: LEAN IN YOUR COMPANY? ................................ 109
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................................... 115





PREFACE
"Lean" is attracting more and more interest. Its agility and rigour
have stood up to the vagaries of fashion and seem to correspond to
the uncertainties and challenges of today.
But those who are not in the know are often confused by its jargon
or misled by the deceptive simplicity of the tools; they are also
victims of misconceptions and prejudice, perpetuated by those who
have not taken the plunge, or those who have tried without success.
Some say "lean is just common sense"; others call it a "stress factor";
still others evoke resistance from local managers. "It's hard to keep
up," concludes a fourth.
Furthermore, books on lean often fall into one of two extremes:
some authors, taking the lean approach for granted, engage in
excessively detailed presentations that discourage the reader. Others
stick to the theory, describing the challenges, systems and postures
but leaving readers in the lurch if they want advice about how to put
it into practice.
Here is a book that never loses sight of the purpose and goals of lean
and is able to bring together and connect all its strategic and
operational dimensions clearly and pragmatically. This is the author's
first merit: Cécile Roche is a lean practitioner of long standing who is
today helping her company, a world leader in the high tech sector, on
the way to lean management. She writes of her experience and
describes it with simplicity and elegance. Taking stock of the
preconceived ideas she has encountered, she points out the pitfalls
that lead to failure and highlights the essential factors that build
success, and she does this without unnecessary jargon and tedious
details.
As a statement of the obvious that is too often forgotten, she
reminds us that lean is primarily a growth approach that places
customer satisfaction at the heart of the company. "Quality is when
the customer comes back, not the product".
And because this growth involves the development of people, at the
end of each chapter she shows the challenges and benefits of lean for
the manager, and also for his co-workers: "with lean, the
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commitment is individual but the result is collective".
Finally, to the classic but unavoidable question "Where to start? And
how?" Cécile Roche responds with a course for progress in a few
interdependent steps, reminding us that lean is a system, not a toolkit
or a list of independent projects.
This book will help managers and their staff who want to engage in a
long-term lean approach to understand the discussions that will guide
their first steps.
Those of us who are continuing their lean approach will discover in
this sharing of a long experience further pitfalls to be avoided, the best
approaches and the right balance to be struck.
For everyone, it is a book that flows easily, rich in unforgettable key
phrases.
Jacques Chaize, September 2013

10

INTRODUCTION
I have run training courses for many executive committees in
companies where the word "lean" was not something new. Each
time, I began by asking managers to tell me what lean meant for
them. Each time I heard: "doing more with less", "eliminating
waste", "involving people", "it's common sense", "we were doing
it without knowing, before it had a name". Much more rarely,
people spoke about the customer...and almost never about
strategy or vision.
Lean has many paradoxes, some apparent, others not. How can
we become more agile, more flexible and more rigorous? How
can we make room for creativity when everyone is talking about
standardizing? What about managers who think that lean means
"bottom-up", but at the same time remain convinced that a good
manager is one who provides solutions? Or when you see that it is
so difficult to carry out actions that seem full of common sense
with everyone on a daily basis?
I often reply that it seems unlikely that you are engaged in
lean without realising it because the effort that this requires
day after day is probably too great for that.
When you work in a large company, there are often many layers
between top management, company management and operational
staff. And very often, local managers are accused of sabotaging
every attempt to progress. "Resistant to change" and
"overwhelmed by daily preoccupations," they are thought to be the
biggest obstacle to introducing improvement on a daily basis.
Maybe! I have seen that staff and their direct managers often
outpace directors who have delegated lean to them but have not
bothered to be lean themselves!
"The question is not to do lean, but to become lean" (Oreste Fiume).
No book will ever be enough to achieve a lean approach. First of
all because there is no sacred book about lean, one that you would
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