Cette publication ne fait pas partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Elle est disponible uniquement à l'achat (la librairie de YouScribe)
Achetez pour : 183,94 € Lire un extrait

Téléchargement

Format(s) : PDF

avec DRM

Protein Delivery Physical Systems

De
0 page

Researchers describe their work and that of their colleagues in developing delivery systems for proteins. They include biodegradable microspheres, controlled release injectable implants, nondegradable polymer matrices, hydrogels, multiple emulsions, transdermal peptides, infusion pumps, and insulin

Voir plus Voir moins

Vous aimerez aussi

Contents
Chapter 1
Protein Delivery from Biodegradable Microspheres Jeffrey L. Cleland
1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Components for Successful Development of Microsphere Formulations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1. Polymer Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2. Engineering of Microsphere Formulations . . . . . . . . . 8 2.3. Protein Stability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3. Case Studies of Drug Delivery from Biodegradable Microspheres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 ® 3.1. Lupron Depot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.2. MN rgp120 Controlled Release Vaccine . . . . . . . . . . 26 4. Immunogenicity and InjectionSite Considerations . . . . . . . 30 5. Regulatory Requirements for Development of Protein Delivery from Microspheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 5.1. Toxicology Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 5.2. Residual Solvent Concerns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 5.3. Manufacturing Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 5.4. Preclinical Animal Models and Clinical Experiments... 37 6. Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chapter 2
Degradable Controlled Release Systems Useful for Protein Delivery Kathleen V. Roskos and Richard Maskiewicz
1. Introduction 2. Definitions .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45 48
xiii
xiv
Contents
3. Synthetic Hydrophobic Degradable Polymers . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.1. Poly(lactic acid). Poly(glycolic acid). and Their Copolymers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.2. Polycaprolactone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.3. Poly(hydroxybutyrate), Poly(hydroxyvalerate), and Their Copolymers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3.4. Poly(orthoesters). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 3.5. Polyanhydrides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3.6. Polyphosphazenes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 3.7. Delivery of Vaccines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 4. Hydrophilic Polymeric Biomaterials and Hydrophobic Nonpolymeric Biomaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 4.1. General Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 4.2. Specific Hydrophilic Polymeric Biomaterials . . . . . . . . . 71 4.3. Specific Hydrophobic Nonpolymeric Biomaterials . . . . . . . 79 4.4. Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 5. Conclusions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Chapter 3
Delivery of Proteins from a Controlled Release Injectable Implant Gerald L . Yewey. Ellen G . Duysen, S . Mark Cox, and Richard L . Dunn
1. The ATRIGEL. . . . . . . . . . . Drug Delivery System 93 2.Effects of Formulation Variables on Protein Release Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 2.1. Polymer Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 2.2. Polymer Concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 2.3. Polymer Molecular Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 2.4. Solvent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 2.5. Protein Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 2.6. Additives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 . . . 3.In VitroCharacterization . 102. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Protein Quantitation in Different Release Media . . . . . . . . . . 102 3.2. Protein Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 3.3. Enzyme Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 3.4. Cellular Bioactivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 4.In Vivo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110Evaluations . 4.1. Biocompatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 4.2. Protein Release Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 4.3. Bioactivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1. Biocompatible Polymers Used as Hydrophobic Matrices. . 1.2. Protein Releasef rom Polymer Matrices . . . . . . . . . . 2. Mechanisms and Models for Protein Release from Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1. Macroscopic Models of Diffusion in Porous Polymer Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Microscopic Models of Diffusion in Porous Polymer Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Applications of Protein/Polymer Matrix Systems . . . . . . . . 3.1. Topical Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Targeted Delivery of Proteins to Specific Tissue Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Systemic Delivery for Extended Periods . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119 120 122
131 132 133
115 116
5. Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139 140 142 144 145 145 147 149 151 151 152
DiffusionControlled Delivery of Proteins from Hydrogels and Other Hydrophilic Systems Mary Tanya am Ende and Antonios G. Mikos
Chapter 5
Chapter 4
xv
Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1. Mechanisms of Protein Diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2. Structure of Hydrophilic Polymers . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3. Methods for Loading Proteins into Hydrogels . . . . . . . 2. DiffusionControlled Delivery Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1. Reservoir Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Matrix Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3. Biodegradable Hydrogels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Factors Affecting the Diffusion of Proteins . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Hydrogel Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protein Delivery from Nondegradable Polymer Matrices Tammy L . Wyatt and W. Mark Saltzman
125
124
133 134 134
xvi
Contents
4. Techniques for Measurement of the Diffusion Coefficient . . . . 4.1. Membrane Permeation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Absorption/Desorption Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3. Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM) . . . . . . . . . . 4.4. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy . . . . . . 4.5. QuasiElastic Light Scattering (QELS) Method . . . . . . 4.6. Other Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6
153 155 157 160 160 161 162 162
Poly(ethylene glycol)Coated Nanospheres: Potential Carriers for Intravenous Drug Administration Ruxandra Gref Yoshiharu Minamitake, Maria Teresa Peracchia, Avi Domb, Vladimir Trubetskoy, Vladimir Torchilin, and Robert Langer 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 1.1. Approaches to Increase Particle Blood Circulation Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 1.2. PEG Hydrophilic Coatings: Mechanism of Protein Rejection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 2. PEGCoated LongCirculating Drug Carriers . . . . . . . . . 171 3. PEGCoated Biodegradable Nanospheres: Potential LongCirculating Drug Carriers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 3.1. Biodegradable Polymers Containing PEG Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 3.2. Preparation of PEGCoated Nanospheres . . . . . . . . . 176 4. Nanosphere Characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 4.1. Morphology Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 4.2. Size Distribution Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 4.3. Detection and Stability of the PEG Coating . . . . . . . . 180 4.4. Surface Hydrophobicity and Charge Determination . . . . . 181 5. Drug Encapsulation in PEGCoated Nanospheres . . . . . . . 183 5.1. Drug Encapsulation and Release Properties. . . . . . . .183 5.2. Parameters Influencing Drug Release . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.Ex VivoStudies (PhagocytosisAssay) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 7. Blood HalfLife and Organ Distribution of PEGCoated Nanospheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 8. Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Contents
Chapter 7
Multiple Emulsions for the Delivery of Proteins Merrick L . Shively 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Methods of Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Stability Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Surfactant Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Osmotic Gradients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4. Process Denaturation of Protein . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5. Methods to Determine Physical Stability . . . . . . . . . 4. Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1. Parenteral Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Oral Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Solid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .state Emulsions . 5.1. Method of Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2. Physical Properties of Solidstate Emulsions . . . . . . . . 5.3. Oral Administration of Vancomycin Solidstate Emulsion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Miscellaneous Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1. Vaccine Adjuvants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2. Enzyme Immobilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 8
Transdermal Peptide Delivery Using Electroporation Russell O . Potts, D . Bommannan, Ooi Wong, Janet A . Tamada. Jim E . Riviere, and Nancy A . MonteiroRiviere
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1.In VitroTransport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Isolated Perfused Porcine Skin Flap . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3. Skin Toxicology following Electroporation . . . . . . . . 3. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xvii
199 200 201 201 202 202 202 203 203 203 204 205 206 206
207 208 208 208 209 209
213 217 217 227 232 235 235
xviii
Chapter 9
Protein Delivery with Infusion Pumps Ulrike Bremer, C . Russell Horres, and Michael L. Francoeur
Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1. Rationale for Infusion Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2. Limitations of Infusion Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. History of Infusion Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Stationary and Portable Infusion Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. StationaryInfusionPumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Implantable Infusion Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. External Infusion Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10
Oral Delivery of Microencapsulated Proteins Mary D . DiBiase and Eric M . Morrel 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Mechanisms of Intestinal Absorption of Proteins and Peptides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1. Passive Diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. CarrierMediated Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3. ReceptorMediated and NonReceptorMediated Endocytosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Mechanisms of Intestinal Absorption of Microparticulates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Transcellular Pathway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Paracellular Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Liposome Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Polyester Microspheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3. Zein Microspheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4. Proteinoid Microspheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5. Polycyanoacrylate Microspheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6. LipidBased Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
239 239 242 243 245 246 249 250 252 253
255
257 257 259
261
264 265 267 268 269 269 270 271 272 273 275 277 277
Contents
Chapter 11
Controlled Delivery of Somatotropins Susan M. Cady and William D. Steber
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Preformulation Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1. Solution Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Molecular Modification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Injectables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. OilBased Gel Depots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Microsphere Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Liposomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4. Emulsions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5. Aqueous Gels and Complexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Implants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1. Uncoated Implants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Coated Implants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Osmotic Devices 6. Miscellaneous Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1. Wound Healing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2. Nasal Delivery Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 12
InsulinIontophoresis Burton H. Sage, Jr.
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Specific Drug Delivery Requirements for Insulin . . . . . . 2.1. Duplicating the Function of the Pancreas . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Candidate Systems for Insulin Delivery . . . . . . . . . . 3. Capabilities of Iontophoresis Related to Insulin Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Noninvasive Delivery of Insulin . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Control of Delivery Rate of Insulin . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Bolus Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4. Dose Precision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5. Portal Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6. Bioavailability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xix
289 291 291 293 295 295 299 301 301 302 303 303 305 310 312 312 313 313 313
319 322 322 323
326 327 327 327 328 328 328
xx
Contents
3.7. Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.8. Summary of Capabilities Related to Insulin Delivery . . . . 4. Theoretical Limitations and Published Results . . . . . . . . . 4.1. Published Results of Insulin Iontophoresis . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Theoretical and Practical Limitations to Insulin Iontophoresis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Physicochemical Properties of Insulin Related to Iontophoresis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1. Charge Titration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2. Solubility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3. Enzymatic Degradation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4. InsulinSelfAssociation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Future Prospects for Iontophoretic Delivery of Insulin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 13
Insulin Formulation and Delivery Jens Brange and Lotte Langkjær
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Formulation of Insulin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2. Formulation for Parenteral Administration . . . . . . . 2.3. Formulation for Alternative Routes . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4. Insulin Analogs and Derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Delivery of Insulin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2. Parenteral Insulin Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3. Alternative Routes of Insulin Delivery . . . . . . . . . 4. Summary and Future Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
329 330 330 330
333
336 336 337 338 338
339 340
343 344 344 345 351 352 355 355 357 368 385 386
411
Un pour Un
Permettre à tous d'accéder à la lecture
Pour chaque accès à la bibliothèque, YouScribe donne un accès à une personne dans le besoin