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Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics

De
488 pages
Widely regarded as the most authoritative and comprehensive book in its field, the fourth edition of Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics includes new and substantially updated chapters to this highly praised text.
  • Extensively updated throughout, this new edition contains substantially expanded chapters on poroelasticity, wave propogation, and subsurface stresses
  • Features entirely new chapters on rock fractures and micromechanical models of rock behaviour
  • Discusses fundamental concepts such as stress and strain
  • Offers a thorough introduction to the subject before expertly delving into a fundamental, self-contained discussion of specific topics
  • Unavailable for many years, now back by popular demand.

 

An Instructor manual CD-ROM for this title is available. Please contact our Higher Education team at HigherEducation@wiley.com for more information.

Reviews:

“With this attention to detail, and rigorous adherence to clarity and exactness in description, this edition will consolidate the standing achieved by the earlier editions as a most authoritative and comprehensive book in its field. It will continue to serve as a leading reference work for geoscientists interested in structural geology, tectonics and petrophysics as well as for civil, mining and petroleum engineers.” (Petroleum Geoscience)

"...I consider this book to be an invaluable reference for studying and understanding the fundamental science at the base of rock mechanics. I believe this to be a must-have textbook and I strongly recommend it to anyone, student or professional, interested in the subject." (Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering)

"An excellent book, very well presented, and is a must for the shelves of serious engineers and scientists active or interested in the fields of rock mechanics and rock engineering.... Highly recommended." (South African Geographical Journal, 2008)

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Contents
Preface to the Fourth Edition
1 Rock as a Material 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Joints andfaults 1.3 Rock-forming minerals 1.4 The fabric of rocks 1.5 The mechanical nature of rock
2
Analysis of Stress and Strain 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Definition of traction andstress 2.3 Analysis of stress in two dimensions 2.4 Graphical representations of stress in two dimensions 2.5 Stresses in three dimensions 2.6 Stress transformations in three dimensions 2.7 Mohr’s representation of stress in three dimensions 2.8 Stress invariants andstress deviation 2.9 Displacement andstrain 2.10 Infinitesimal strain in two dimensions 2.11 Infinitesimal strain in three dimensions 2.12 Determination of principal stresses or strains from measurements 2.13 Compatibility equations 2.14 Stress andstrain in polar andcylindrical coordinates 2.15 Finite strain
3 Friction on Rock Surfaces 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Amonton’s law 3.3 Friction on rock surfaces 3.4 Stick–slip oscillations 3.5 Sliding on a plane of weakness 3.6 Effects of time andvelocity
ix
1 1 2 4 6 7
9 9 10 17 23 27 32 35 38 41 43 49
55 56 57 60
65 65 66 67 70 73 76
vi
contents
4
5
6
7
Deformation and Failure of Rock 4.1 Introduction 4.2 The stress–strain curve 4.3 Effects of confining stress andtemperature 4.4 Types of fracture 4.5 Coulomb failure criterion 4.6 Mohr’s hypothesis 4.7 Effects of pore fluids 4.8 Failure under true-triaxial conditions 4.9 The effect of anisotropy on strength
Linear Elasticity 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Stress–strain relations for an isotropic linear elastic solid107 5.3 Special cases 5.4 Hooke’s law in terms of deviatoric stresses and strains 5.5 Equations of stress equilibrium 5.6 Equations of stress equilibrium in cylindrical and spherical coordinates 5.7 Airy stress functions 5.8 Elastic strain energy andrelatedprinciples 5.9 Uniqueness theorem for elasticity problems 5.10 Stress–strain relations for anisotropic materials
Laboratory Testing of Rocks 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Hydrostatic tests 6.3 Uniaxial compression 6.4 Triaxial tests 6.5 Stability andstiff testing machines 6.6 True-triaxial tests 6.7 Diametral compression of cylinders 6.8 Torsion of circular cylinders 6.9 Bending tests 6.10 Hollow cylinders
Poroelasticity and Thermoelasticity 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Hydrostatic poroelasticity 7.3 Undrained compression 7.4 Constitutive equations of poroelasticity 7.5 Equations of stress equilibrium andfluidflow 7.6 One-dimensional consolidation 7.7 Applications of poroelasticity 7.8 Thermoelasticity
80 80 80 85 87 90 94 97 100 103
106 106
111 115 116
122 126 128 135 137
145 145 146 148 150 152 157 158 161 162 165
168 168 169 175 178 183 189 195 197
8
9
contents
Stresses around Cavities and Excavations 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Complex variable methodfor two-dimensional elasticity problems 8.3 Homogeneous state of stress 8.4 Pressurizedhollow cylinder 8.5 Circular hole in a rock mass with given far-field principal stresses 8.6 Stresses appliedto a circular hole in an infinite rock mass 8.7 Stresses appliedto the surface of a solidcylinder 8.8 Inclusions in an infinite region 8.9 Elliptical hole in an infinite rock mass 8.10 Stresses near a crack tip 8.11 Nearly rectangular hole 8.12 Spherical cavities 8.13 Penny-shapedcracks 8.14 Interactions between nearby cavities
Inelastic Behavior 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Plasticity andyield 9.3 Elastic – plastic hollow cylinder 9.4 Circular hole in an elastic – brittle – plastic rock mass 9.5 Perfectly plastic behavior 9.6 Flow between flat surfaces 9.7 Flow rules andhardening 9.8 Creep 9.9 Simple rheological models 9.10 Theory of viscoelasticity 9.11 Some simple viscoelastic problems
10 Micromechanical Models 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Effective moduli of heterogeneous rocks 10.3 Effect of pores on compressibility 10.4 Crack closure andelastic nonlinearity 10.5 Effective medium theories 10.6 Sliding crack friction and hysteresis 10.7 Griffith cracks andthe Griffith locus 10.8 Linear elastic fracture mechanics 10.9 Griffith theory of failure
11 Wave Propagation in Rocks 11.1 Introduction 11.2 One-dimensional elastic wave propagation 11.3 Harmonic waves andgroup velocity 11.4 Elastic waves in unbounded media
vii
205 205
206 211 214
216 221 225 228 231 237 242 244 247 250
252 252 252 255 257 260 263 266 268 271 276 279
281 281 281 284 292 295 301 307 311 314
321 321 322 327 332
viii
contents
11.5 Reflection andrefraction of waves at an interface 11.6 Surface andinterface waves 11.7 Transient waves 11.8 Effects of fluidsaturation 11.9 Attenuation 11.10 Inelastic waves
12 Hydromechanical Behavior of Fractures 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Geometry of rock fractures 12.3 Normal stiffness of rock fractures 12.4 Behavior of rock fractures under shear 12.5 Hydraulic transmissivity of rock fractures 12.6 Coupledhydromechanical behavior 12.7 Seismic response of rock fractures 12.8 Fracturedrock masses
13 State of Stress Underground 13.1 Introduction 13.2 Simple models for the state of stress in the subsurface 13.3 Measuredvalues of subsurface stresses 13.4 Surface loads on a half-space: two-dimensional theory 13.5 Surface loads on a half-space: three-dimensional theory 13.6 Hydraulic fracturing 13.7 Other stress-measurement methods
14 Geological Applications 14.1 Introduction 14.2 Stresses andfaulting 14.3 Overthrust faulting and sliding under gravity 14.4 Stresses aroundfaults 14.5 Mechanics of intrusion 14.6 Beam models for crustal folding 14.7 Earthquake mechanics
References
Index
337 343 347 353 355 360
365 365 365 369 375 377 386 388 394
399 399 400 403 404 408 411 415
419 419 419 423 425 428 431 434
439
469