ap_french_course description

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ap_french_course description

Publié le : jeudi 21 juillet 2011
Lecture(s) : 111
Nombre de pages : 31
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Course Description
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Te Cllege Bard The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,600 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,800 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program®(AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. For further information visit www.collegeboard.com. The College Board and the Advanced Placement Program encourage teachers, AP Coordinators, and school administrators to make equitable access a guiding principle for their AP programs. The College Board is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in rigorous and academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. The Board encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the AP Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population.
© 2009 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Central, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html.
Contnts Welcome to the AP Program                                                 1 AP Courses                                                            1 AP Exams                                                              1 AP Course Audit                                                        1 AP Reading                                                             2 AP Exam Grades                                                        2 Credit and Placement for AP Grades                                     3 Setting Credit and Placement Policies for AP Grades                       3 AP French Language                                                        4 The Course                                                            4 The Exam                                                              4 Section I: Listening                                                    5 Sample Questions                                                  5 Section I: Reading                                                     9 Sample Questions                                                  9 Answers to Multiple-Choice Questions                                16 Section II: Writing                                                   17 Sample Questions                                                 17 Answers to Fill-ins                                                 20 Section II: Essay Topics                                               21 Sample Questions                                                 21 Section II: Speaking                                                  21 Sample Questions                                                 22 Teacher Support                                                          25 AP Central (apcentralcollegeboardcom)                                  25 AP Publications and Other Resources                                     25 Teacher’s Guides                                                    25 Course Descriptions                                                  25 Released Exams                                                     25
© 2009 Te Cllege Bard. All rigts reserved. Visit te Cllege Bard n te Web: www.cllegebard.cm.
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Wlcom to t AP®Program For over 50 years, the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP) has partnered with colleges, universities, and high schools to provide students with the opportunity to take college-level course work and exams while still in high school Offering more than 30 different subjects, each culminating in a rigorous exam, AP provides motivated and academically prepared students with the opportunity to earn college credit or placement and helps them stand out in the college admissions process Taught by dedicated, passionate AP teachers who bring cutting-edge content knowledge and expert teaching skills to the classroom, AP courses help students develop the study skills, habits of mind, and critical thinking skills that they will need in college AP is accepted by more than 3,600 colleges and universities worldwide for college credit, advanced placement, or both on the basis of successful AP Exam grades This includes over 90 percent of four-year institutions in the United States More information about the AP Program is available at the back of this Course Description and at AP Central®College Board’s online home for AP teachers, the (apcentralcollegeboardcom) Students can find more information at the AP student site (wwwcollegeboardcom/apstudents)
AP Crses More than 30 AP courses in a wide variety of subject areas are now available A committee of college faculty and master AP teachers designs each AP course to cover the information, skills, and assignments found in the corresponding college course
AP Eams Each AP course has a corresponding exam that participating schools worldwide administer in May Except for AP Studio Art, which is a portfolio assessment, each AP Exam contains a free-response section (essays, problem solving, oral responses, etc) as well as multiple-choice questions Written by a committee of college and university faculty and experienced AP teachers, the AP Exam is the culmination of the AP course and provides students with the opportunity to earn credit and/or placement in college Exams are scored by college professors and experienced AP teachers using scoring standards developed by the committee
AP Crse Adit The intent of the AP Course Audit is to provide secondar y and higher education constituents with the assurance that an “AP” designation on a student’s transcript is credible, meaning the AP Program has authorized a course that has met or exceeded the curricular requirements and classroom resources that demonstrate the academic rigor of a comparable college course To receive authorization from the College Board to label a course “AP,” teachers must participate in the AP Course Audit Courses authorized to use the “AP” designation are listed in the AP Course Ledger made
© 2009 Te Cllege Bard. All rigts reserved. Visit te Cllege Bard n te Web: www.cllegebard.cm.1
available to colleges and universities each fall It is the school’s responsibility to ensure that its AP Course Ledger entr y accurately reflects the AP courses offered within each academic year The AP Program unequivocally supports the principle that each individual school must develop its own curriculum for courses labeled “AP” Rather than mandating any one curriculum for AP courses, the AP Course Audit instead provides each AP teacher with a set of expectations that college and secondar y school faculty nationwide have established for college-level courses AP teachers are encouraged to develop or main-tain their own curriculum that either includes or exceeds each of these expectations; such courses will be authorized to use the “AP” designation Credit for the success of AP courses belongs to the individual schools and teachers that create powerful, locally designed AP curricula Complete information about the AP Course Audit is available at www collegeboard com/apcourseaudit AP Reading AP Exams—with the exception of AP Studio Art, which is a portfolio assessment— consist of dozens of multiple-choice questions scored by machine, and free-response questions scored at the annual AP Reading by thousands of college faculty and expert AP teachers AP Readers use scoring standards developed by college and university faculty who teach the corresponding college course The AP Reading offers educators both significant professional development and the opportunity to network with colleagues For more information about the AP Reading, or to apply to ser ve as a Reader, visit apcentralcollegeboardcom/readers AP Eam Grades The Readers’ scores on the free-response questions are combined with the results of the computer-scored multiple-choice questions; the weighted raw scores are summed to give a composite score The composite score is then converted to a grade on AP’s 5-point scale: AP GRADE QUALIFICATION   5 Extremely well qualified  4 Well qualified  3 Qualified  2 Possibly qualified 1 No recommendation  AP Exam grades of 5 are equivalent to A grades in the corresponding college course AP Exam grades of 4 are equivalent to grades of A –, B+, and B in college AP Exam grades of 3 are equivalent to grades of B –, C–, and C in college
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Credit and Placement fr AP Grades Thousands of four-year colleges grant credit, placement, or both for qualifying AP Exam grades because these grades represent a level of achievement equivalent to that of students who have taken the corresponding college course This college-level equivalency is ensured through several AP Program processes: • College faculty are involved in course and exam development and other AP activities Currently, college faculty: • Ser ve as chairs and members of the committees that develop the Course Descriptions and exams in each AP course • Are responsible for standard setting and are involved in the evaluation of student responses at the AP Reading The Chief Reader for each AP subject is a college faculty member • Lead professional development seminars for new and experienced AP teachers. • Ser ve as the senior reviewers in the annual AP Course Audit, ensuring AP teachers’ syllabi meet the curriculum guidelines of college-level courses • AP courses and exams are reviewed and updated regularly based on the results of curriculum sur veys at up to 200 colleges and universities, collaborations among the College Board and key educational and disciplinar y organizations, and the inter-actions of committee members with professional organizations in their discipline • Periodic college comparability studies are undertaken in which the performance of college students on AP Exams is compared with that of AP students to confirm that the AP grade scale of 1 to 5 is properly aligned with current college standards For more information about the role of colleges and universities in the AP Program, visit the Higher Ed Ser vices section of the College Board Web site at professionals collegeboardcom/higher-ed Setting Credit and Placement Plicies fr AP Grades The College Board Web site for education professionals has a section specifically for colleges and universities that provides guidance in setting AP credit and placement policies Additional resources, including links to AP research studies, released exam questions, and sample student responses at var ying levels of achievement for each AP Exam are also available Visit professionals collegeboardcom/higher-ed/placement/ap  The “AP Credit Policy Info” online search tool provides links to credit and placement policies at more than 1,000 colleges and universities This tool helps students find the credit hours and/or advanced placement they may receive for qualifying exam grades within each AP subject at a specified institution AP Credit Policy Info is available at wwwcollegeboardcom/ap/creditpolicy 
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AP Frnc Languag AP French Language is comparable in content and in difficulty to a course in French Composition and Conversation at the third-year college level Students who enroll in AP French Language should already have a good command of French grammar and vocabular y and have competence in listening, reading, speaking, and writing Although these qualifications may be attained in a variety of ways, it is assumed that most students will be in the final stages of their secondar y school training and will have had substantial course work in the language
T h E C o u R S E The course should emphasize the use of language for active communication and help students develop the following:  A the ability to understand spoken French in various contexts;  B. a French vocabular y sufficiently ample for reading newspaper and magazine articles, literar y texts, and other nontechnical writings without dependence on a dictionar y; and  C. reasonableability to express themselves coherently, resourcefully, and with the fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken French Course content can reflect intellectual interests shared by the students and teacher (the arts, current events, literature, sports, etc) Materials might well include audio and video recordings, films, newspapers, and magazines The course seeks to develop language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) that can be used in various activities and disciplines rather than to cover any specific body of subject matter Extensive training in the organization and writing of compositions should also be emphasized For detailed information and practical suggestions on teaching an AP French Language course, it is strongly recommended that teachers consult AP Central and the AP French Language Teacher’s Guide(see page 25 for information on AP publications and other resources)
T h E E x A M The AP French Language Exam is approximately two and one-half hours in length It is not based on any particular subject matter but instead attempts to evaluate the student’s level of performance in the use of the language, both in understanding written and spoken French and in responding in correct and idiomatic French Listening and reading are tested in the multiple-choice section; writing and speaking are tested in the free-response section The portion of the exam devoted to each skill counts for one-fourth of the final grade
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Sample Questions forFrenc Langage
Students may have difficulty during the speaking part of the exam if they are not familiar with operating the recording equipment Teachers are encouraged to arrange a trial run of the exam equipment and procedures with their students prior to the actual administration With the exception of directions, French is used exclusively both in the exam materials and in the student responses Use of dictionaries or other reference works during the exam is not permitted Sectin I: Listening Listening skills are tested in two ways on the exam First, students are asked to listen to a series of brief exchanges between two speakers The exchanges are spoken twice, after which students choose the most appropriate rejoinder from the four choices printed in their exam booklets In the second portion of the listening part, students listen to recorded dialogues or brief monologues and then, after each, they are asked questions on what they have just heard The questions as well as the answer choices for the questions based on dialogues are printed in the exam booklet Before listening to each dialogue, students will be given 30 seconds to read the questions based on it Samples of both types of listening questions are provided on the following pages The material enclosed in brackets is heard by the student and does not appear in the exam booklet The speakers “W,” “WA,” and “WB” are women Speakers “M,” “MA,” and “MB” are men The next to a selection indicates that an accompanying audio file is available on AP Central To hear an audio recording, click on in the Course Description PDF file, or go to the AP French Language Home Page (apcentral collegeboardcom/frenchlang) and click on “AP French Language Course Description Audio Files” Sample Qestins Questions 1–5 Exchanges  1 [(M) Je ne trouve plus mes clés, les as-tu vues?  (W) Je crois que c’est ta soeur qui les a prises] (A) bon, je vais les garder Ah (B) Est-ce qu’elle est déjà partie? Oh! (C) attention de ne pas les perdre Fais (d) Alors, je les mets dans ma poche
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Sample Questions forFrenc Langage
 2 [(W) Ça fait un quart d’heure qu’on cherche à se garer dans cette rue Si tu ne trouves pas tout de suite une place, on va rater le début du film  (M) Mais non Du calme, Françoise On a encore dix minutes] (A) Écoute, va au parking payant là-bas au lieu de tourner en rond (B) Écoute,aller à la gare prendre le train on peut toujours (C) D’accord, rentrons chez nous tout de suite (d)  D’accord, reposons-nous un peu, ça va nous calmer  3 [(M) Bonsoir, Olivier Désolé d’être en retard, mais il y avait un embouteillage monstre sur la route!  (M) Aucune importance De toute façon, le dîner n’est pas encore prêt] (A) Moi aussi, j’ai peur des monstres (B) Non merci, je n’ai pas soif (C) toujours de grandes bouteilles J’achète (d) mieux, mais je suis quand même gêné Tant  4 [(W) Dis Bruno, tu es libre ce soir? Delphine donne une soirée et toute la bande sera là  (M) Génial! Ma cousine de L yon est ici pour quelques jours, tu crois que je pourrais l’amener avec moi?] (A) sûr, Delphine adore les lions! Bien (B) de  Pasproblème Plus on est de fous, plus on s’amuse! (C) ne crois  Jepas Delphine n’est jamais libre le samedi (d) Ça m’étonnerait, la bande sera en retard  5 [(W) Bonsoir chéri Ah, je suis contente de rentrer, je meurs de faim Qu’est-ce qu’il y a à manger?  (M) Je suis désolé Je n’ai pas eu le temps d’aller au supermarché aujourd’hui, il n’y a rien à manger dans la maison et j’ai un rendez-vous important dans dix minutes] (A) Alors, on va au restaurant ensemble? (B) je vais préparer le dîner Alors, (C) pis, j’irai au café du coin Tant (d) Heureusement que je viens de manger Questions 6–10 Dialogues
[(MA) Corinne est encore en train de regarder la télé au lieu de faire ses devoirs! C’est très mauvais! (WB) Mais, pas du tout! Une ou deux heures par jour, cela ne fait de mal à personne Grâce à la télé, on s’informe de ce qui se passe dans le monde (MA) Je ne suis pas d’accord Ça rend les enfants passifs, prêts à tout accepter sans esprit critique Ils restent là bêtement devant l’écran    Non, je vais éteindre le téléviseur une fois pour toutes! 6© 2009 Te Cllege Bard. All rigts reserved. Visit te Cllege Bard n te Web: www.cllegebard.cm.
Sample Questions forFrenc Langage
(WA) Mais, Papa, qu’est-ce que tu fais? Je regarde un film que je    (MA) Assez de télé, Corinne! Ça suffit Va dans ta chambre et fais tes devoirs! (WA) Mais c’est exactement ce que je    (MA) Tu n’auras jamais ton bac si tu continues comme ça Les devoirs, ça compte Fais ce que je te dis (WA) Écoute, Papa Puisque je te dis que    (MA) Tais-toi Et ne me casse plus la tête avec la télé    (WB) Calme-toi, François C’est son prof d’histoire qui lui a demandé de regarder ce film! C’est sur la Deuxième Guerre Mondiale et elle doit en faire un exposé en classe demain matin   ]  6 Qu’est-ce que le père pense au sujet de la télévision? (A) Elle encourage la violence (B) favorise la passivité des enfants Elle (C) contribue à l’éducation Elle (d) détruit la vie de famille Elle  7 Comment Corinne réagit-elle dans ce dialogue? (A) Elle essaie de s’expliquer (B) interrompt son père Elle (C) se dispute avec sa mère Elle (d) éteint le téléviseur Elle  8 Qu’est-ce que le père voulait faire? (A) Regarder une autre émission (B) Interdire la télévision chez lui (C) le téléviseur du salon Enlever (d) les heures de télévision Limiter  9 Pourquoi Corinne regarde-t-elle la télévision? (A) irrite ses parents Cela (B) fait partie de ses devoirs Cela (C) Elle veut voir son émission favorite (d) veut en discuter avec ses parents Elle 10 Que fait la mère dans cette scène? (A) Elle refuse d’inter venir (B) Elle prend parti contre sa fille (C) Elle se met en colère (d) Elle explique la situation à son mari
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