Dimension stones of the historical city wall of Cluj-Napoca, Romania [Elektronische Ressource] : construction, weathering, damages = Bausteine der historischen Stadtmauer von Cluj-Napoca, Rumänien / vorgelegt von Calin Paul Racataianu

        Dimension Stones of the Historical City Wall  of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania. Construction, Weathering, Damages.   Bausteine der historischen Stadtmauer von Cluj‐Napoca, Rumänien. Konstruktion, Verwitterung, Schäden.            Der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultäten der Friedrich‐Alexander‐Universität Erlangen‐Nürnberg zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades           vorgelegt von  Dipl.Ing.Mgeol. Calin Paul  Racataianu  aus Cluj‐Napoca, Romania                                   Als Dissertation genehmigt von den Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg     Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 29.07.2010  Vorsitzender der Promotionkommission: Prof. Dr. Eberhard Bänsch  Ers tberi chters ta tter: Prof. Dr. Roman Koch   Zweitberichterstatter: Prof. Dr. Joachim Rohn            This thesis is dedicated to my wife Table of contents  Acknowledgments ………….……...……………………….………………………………………………………..… i Zusammenfassung …………….…………………………….………………………………………………………..… iii Summary ………………………………………………………… vi Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 1 Chapter I – Classification ……………..……..  6 1.1 General remarks on classifications of rocks …………………….………...………………………….. 6 1.1.1. Sedimentary rocks ……………………………………………………………………..………………… 6 1.3. Rock Types ……………………………………………………………………………..…………………………….. 11 1.3.1. Sedimentary rocks (limestones) …………………………………………..
Publié le : vendredi 1 janvier 2010
Lecture(s) : 43
Source : D-NB.INFO/1007537779/34
Nombre de pages : 331
Voir plus Voir moins

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dimension Stones of the Historical City Wall  
of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania. 
Construction, Weathering, Damages. 
 
 
Bausteine der historischen Stadtmauer 
von Cluj‐Napoca, Rumänien. 
Konstruktion, Verwitterung, Schäden. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultäten 
der Friedrich‐Alexander‐Universität Erlangen‐Nürnberg 
zur 
Erlangung des Doktorgrades 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
vorgelegt von  
Dipl.Ing.Mgeol. Calin Paul  Racataianu 
 
aus Cluj‐Napoca, Romania  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Als Dissertation genehmigt von den
Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät
der Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
 
 
 
 
Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 29.07.2010 
 
Vorsitzender der Promotionkommission: Prof. Dr. Eberhard Bänsch 
 
Ers tberi chters ta tter: Prof. Dr. Roman Koch  
 
Zweitberichterstatter: Prof. Dr. Joachim Rohn  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This thesis is dedicated to my wife Table of contents 
 
Acknowledgments ………….……...……………………….………………………………………………………..… i 
Zusammenfassung …………….…………………………….………………………………………………………..… iii 
Summary ………………………………………………………… vi 
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 1 
Chapter I – Classification ……………..……..  6 
1.1 General remarks on classifications of rocks …………………….………...………………………….. 6 
1.1.1. Sedimentary rocks ……………………………………………………………………..………………… 6 
1.3. Rock Types ……………………………………………………………………………..…………………………….. 11 
1.3.1. Sedimentary rocks (limestones) …………………………………………..………………………. 11 
1.4. Petrophysical and technical data ……………………………………………………..…………………… 14 
1.5. Decaying of natural stones ……………………………………………………………………………………. 14 
1.5.1. Parameters responsible for the decay of rocks …………………………………………….. 16 
1.5.2. Specific weathering processes ……………………….…………………………………………….. 18 
1.5.2.1. Bacterial weathering ………………………………………….….………..………………….. 18 
1.5.2.2. Crusts ……………………..………………………………………….….……..…………………….. 22 
1.5.2.3. Diagnosis.……………….. 23 
 
Chapter II ‐ History of the Old City Defence Wall …………………………………..…………………… 28 
2.1. Short history of Cluj‐Napoca (from 101 AD to 17th century) ………….……………………..  28 
2.2. The Cluj Fortress ‐ Three Phases …………………………………………………………………….…….. 29 
2.2.1. Napoca, the Roman Fortress ………………………………………………………………………..  29 
2.2.2. The Medieval Town ……………………………………………………………………………………… 30 
2.2.2.1 The first medieval fortress (9th‐10th c.) ……………………………………………….. 30 
2.2.2.2 The late medieval  (15th‐16th c.) ………………………………………………. 31 
 
Chapter III ‐ Methods (Classical and new developed techniques) ………………………………. 36   
3.1. Mapping ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36 
3.1.1. The mapping model ……………………………………………………………………………………… 36 
3.1.2. Photogrammetry ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 39 
3.1.3. Mapping models used in the study …………………………………………………………..….. 39 
  3.1.4. Correlation …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 42 
3.2. New Damage Mapping System ……………………………………………………………………………… 44 
3.3. Thin sections …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 52 
3.4. Pictures ………………………………………………………………………… 56 
3.5. CaCO  content measuring ……………………………………………………………………………………… 56 3
3.6. XRD methods used ……………………………………………………… 57 3.7. Salt analyses …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 59 
3.8. E‐Module (sound velocity measurements) ………………………………………………………….…  59 
3.8.1. E‐Modulus measurements ……………………………………………………………………………. 59 
3.8.1.1. Young's modulus ……………………………………………………………………………….…. 59 
3.8.1.2. E‐modulus in mortars’ study ………………………………………………………………… 61 
3.8.2. Sound velocity measurements ……………………………………………………………………… 63 
 
Chapter IV ‐ Geology and study area ……………………………………………..…………………………… 65 
4.1. Overview of the Geology of Romania ……………………………………………………………………. 65 
4.1.1. The Pre‐Carpathian Units ……………………………………………………………………………..  65 
4.1.2. The Carpathian Units ……………………………………………………………………………………. 65 
4.1.3. The internal depressions and their related areas …………………………………………. 66 
4.2. Cluj Limestone ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 67 
4.2.1. The Baci Quarry ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 71 
4.2.2.1. Mineralogy ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 74 
4.2.2.2. Microfacies analyses ……………………………………………………………………………. 74 
 
Chapter V ‐ Weather and pollution …………………………………………………………………………….. 86 
5.1. Climate …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 86 
5.2. Temperature ……………………………………………………………………………………….….……………. 86 
5.3. Rainfall ……………………….………………  87 
5.4. Winds ………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………..…… 87 
5.5. Hours of Sunshine ………………………………………………………………………………….………..……  87 
5.6. Air Pollution …………………………………………………………………………………..………………..……  87 
5.6.1. Acid gas emissions ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 89 
5.6.1.1. Sulphur dioxide (SO ) …………………………………………………………………………… 90 2
5.6.1.2. Nitric oxides (NO ) …………………………..…………………………………………………… 91 x
5.6.1.3. Ammonia (alkaline air) …………………………..……………………………………………. 93 
5.6.2. Heavy metals emissions ……………………………………………………………………………….  94 
5.6.3. Particles in suspension (dust, ashes) …………………………………………………………….  96 
 
Chapter VI ‐ Characteristics, mapping, analyses …………………………………………………………. 97 
6.1. Location no. 1 – Samuil Micu Street ………………………………………………………………………  97 
6.1.1. Anamnesis ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 97 
  6.1.2. Mapping …………………………………………………………………………………………………..….. 98 
  6.1.3. Discussion of the analyses registered by the new data base model ……..………. 100 
6.1.4. Microfacies analyses …………………………………………………………………………….....….. 102 
  6.1.5. Weathering features ………………………………………………………………………………….…. 104 
6.2. Location no. 2 – Potaissa Street …………………………………………………………………………….. 125 6.2.1. Anamnesis ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 125 
  6.2.2. Mapping …………………………………………………………………………………………………..….. 126 
  6.2.3. Discussion of the analyses registered by the new data base model ……..………. 127 
6.2.4. Microfacies analyses …………………………………………………………………………….....….. 128 
  6.2.5. Weathering features ………………………………………………………………………………….…. 130 
6.3. Location no. 3 – Baba Novac Street …………………………………………………………………….… 148 
6.3.1. Anamnesis ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 148 
  6.3.2. Mapping ……………………………..….. 148 
  6.3.3. Discussion of the analyses registered by the new data base model ……..………. 150 
6.3.4. Microfacies analyses  151 
  6.3.5. Weathering features  153 
6.4. Location no. 4 – Cuza Voda Street ……………………………………………………………………….… 170 
6.4.1. Anamnesis  170 
  6.4.2. Mapping …………………………………………………………………………………………………..….. 170 
  6.4.3. Discussion of the analyses registered by the new data base model ……..………. 172 
6.4.4. Microfacies analyses …………………………………………………………………………….....….. 173 
  6.1.5. Weathering features ………………………………………………………………………………….…. 174 
6.5. XRD analyses on limestones ………………………………………………………………………………….. 192 
6.5.1 Results of the XRD analyses (bulk mineralogy) ………………………………………………. 193 
6.5.2  of the XRD clay mineral analyses …………….…………………………….………….. 195 
6.4. Sandstones ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 198 
6.4.1. Feleac Formation ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 198 
6.4.2. Microfacies analyses …………………………………………………………………………………….. 198 
6.7. Mortars ………………………………………………………………………… 201 
6.7.1. General definition and types of mortars ………………………………………………………. 201 
6.7.2. Short historical development of  ……………………………………………………… 201 
6.7.3. Mortar types ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 201 
6.7.4. Analysis of mortars at the historical city wall ……………………………………………….. 203 
6.7.4.1 Macroscopic analysis of types of mortars of the historical city wall ……… 204 
6.7.4.2. Thin section  of mortars ………………………………………………………….. 206 
6.7.4.3. E‐modulus ……………………………………………………………………………………………  207 
6.7.4.4. Salt damages ………………………………………… 210 
6.7.5. XRD analyses  211 
 
Chapter VII ‐ Discussions …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 218 
 
Chapter VIII ‐ Conclusions ……………………………………………………………………………………….….. 231 
 
References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………… 236 
 
Appendix  
 
Curriculum Vitae  Dimension stones of the city wall of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania                                           Acknowledgements  

Acknowledgements 
 
In one way this PhD work is a testimony of the wonderful changes in my life in the last six 
years. In many more ways it reflects the support and caring of the countless people who 
influenced my life, this work and who will also influence my future. 
 
My first, and most earnest, acknowledgment goes to my advisor, Prof. Dr. Roman Koch from 
Angewandte Geowissenschaften, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, who has kept me on track for 
the duration of my studies and has always shown interest, understanding, and great support 
in my ideas, in our additional projects, and also in my problems. I met Prof. Koch six years 
ago, during my international joint master project, and one year later he successfully helped 
me to obtain a scholarship to support my PhD. Special thanks for his support, scientific help 
and guidance in the laboratory work. Special thanks for his enthusiasm to join my ideas 
which made possible during all these years the publication of two new books and several 
other publications as a joint effort. 
 
I would also like to thank Dr. Robert J. Gordon Sobott from the Labor für Baudenkmalpflege 
Naumburg  and  Institut  für  Mineralogie,  Kristallographie  und  Materialwissenschaft, 
Universität  Leipzig  fort  his  precious  help  and  guidance.  His  scientific  knowledge  and 
especially the sound velocity analyses for the mortars were very helpful for my work. 
 
Far too many people to mention individually have assisted in so many ways during my work 
at GeoZentrum Nordbayern. They all have my sincere gratitude. In particular, I would like to 
thank PD Dr. Axel Munnecke and Petra Wenninger for the continuous help during all these 
years, and Birgit Leipner‐Mata, preparator at Labor der PaläoUmwelt for her support. I 
would also want to thank Christian Schulbert for the printings. Thanks to all my colleagues 
from  PaläoUmwelt  and  from  Angewandte  Geowissenschaften,  Christian  Weiss  for  his 
excellent help with the salt analyses for the mortars, Mathias, Barbara, Uwe, Sonja, Killian, 
Martin, Claudia, Chu, Anjia, Andrea, Gergely and so many others, all currently, or previously 
of these institutions, which were all the time a true moral support. 
 
I also owe a huge debt of gratitude to my professors, colleagues and friends from the 
Biology‐Geology Faculty, Babes‐Bolyai University in Cluj‐Napoca, Romania. Professor dr. Ioan 
Bucur deserves particular credits and special thanks for introducing me to the world of 
Palaeontology and for  being constantly a true support all these years. I thank  him for 
believing in me and for the guidance and precious help all these years. This thesis is also a 
part of his enthusiasm, which gave me strength to follow my road. Special thanks go to my 
friends, lecturer dr. Emanoil Sasaran, for his crucial help with the facies types’ discussions 
and for his continuous support, and reader dr. Marcel Benea for all the special field trips 
during  the  years,  for  his  constant  and  precious  help  during  the  mineralogical  and 
petrographical analyses, and for his friendship. I would also want to thank with gratitude to 
all the professors, readers, lecturers and assistants which with their creativity, precious 
knowledge and ideas helped me from my first day in the Geology Faculty in Cluj‐Napoca 10 
years ago until now: reader dr. Nicoale Har, prof. dr. Sorin Filipescu, Prof.dr. Corina Ionescu, 
prof. dr. Lucretia Ghergari, prof. dr. Bogdan Onac, assistant dr. Constantin Balica, assistant 
dr. Agnes Gal, prof. dr. Ioan Balintoni, dr. Dana Pop, dr. Liana Sasaran and many others. I also 
want to thank to all my colleagues Ph.D. students from Cluj‐Napoca for their support all 
i Dimension stones of the city wall of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania                                           Acknowledgements  

these  years,  Anamaria,  Camelia,  Mihai,  Diana,  Claudia,  and  also  to  all  my  colleagues 
currently or previously of Babes‐Bolyai University. 
 
I would like to thank and to express my gratitude to Mr. Emil Boc, the nowadays prime‐
minister of Romania and former mayor of Cluj‐Napoca for his crucial help, support, and 
official approvals necessary for the study of the historical wall. 
 
The special friendship offered by my life‐time friends from Romania and Poland gave me 
strength to continue and successfully finish my projects and therefore I want to thank from 
my heart to Lucian, Irina, Claudiu M. and his wife, Alexandru and Loredana, their parents, 
Claudiu and Simina Anghel, Ana, dr. Ewa Welc and to all my friends not mentioned here. 
 
A penultimate thank‐you goes to my wonderful parents, to my parents‐in‐law and to my 
relatives. For always being there when I needed them most, and never once complaining 
about how infrequently I visit, they deserve far more credit than I can ever give them. A 
special thank‐you goes to my father, an excellent mineralogist, which was encouraging me to 
follow the geology line in my life and for always believing in me. I thank him also for his 
precious help in the mineralogy field. I would like to thank all my relatives for their constant 
support all these years, especially to my aunt Daniela for her help and for being always my 
number one fan. 
 
My final, and most heartfelt, acknowledgment must go to my lovely wife Florentina. She has 
worked diligently, and successfully, for more than five years to ensure my nowadays success. 
Her love, support, encouragement, and companionship have turned my journey from the 
day we met until now into a pleasure. She was never complaining about my long time spent 
away from home, and she was always the energy source I needed for this tremendous work. 
For all that, and for being everything I am not, she has my everlasting love. This thesis is 
dedicated to her. 
 
Last, but not least, I extend thanks and appreciation to everyone who helped directly or 
indirectly to get this work done. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ii Dimension stones of the city wall of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania                                                       Zusammenfassung                                       
 
Zusammenfassung  
 
Die  historische  Stadtmauer der ehemaligen Festung von  Cluj  stellt ein einzigartiges und 
bedeutendes  Symbol der mehr als 1900‐jährigen  Geschichte  von Cluj ‐Napoca  dar. Heute 
existieren nur noch Teile dieser ehemals umfassenden Stadtmauer. 
Der wirtschaftliche  Aufschwung der Festung  von  Cl uj lag im 15. Jh. als die damals freie 
cht  verliehen  bekam,  eine eigene  Anlage  mit  Verteidigungswällen, Reichsstadt  das  Re
Bastionen und Türmen  zu  errichten. 
Die  Stadt hatte zuvor zwei Höhepunkte in ihrer Entwicklung, zunächst die Kol onisierung 
durch die Römer (101 ‐271 AD) und später eine zweite intensive Besiedlungsphase im 9. 
t und  10.  Jh.  In  diesem  Zeitraum  ist  die  eigentliche  Gründungzeit  der  späteren  Stad
anzusiedeln. 
Die   Errichtung der Stadtmauer, die  zur  Verteidigung der mittelalterlichen  Festung  Cl uj 
diente, dauerte vom 15. Jh. bis  zum Ende des  16. Jh. Das  Gebiet der Festung Cl uj  umfasste 
damals 45 ha  und war  mit beeindruckenden Festungsanlagen, und der aus lokalen Steinen 
(noch heute Transportlöcher erhalten) erbauten Stadtmauer. 
nd nur noch drei Teile der historischen Mauer erhalten. Sie  befinden sich teilweise Heute  si
in einem ruinösen  Zustand, was überwiegend auf die Verwendung von nicht geeignetem, 
sehr verwitterungsanfälligem Steinmaterial (Tertiär Kalks teine)  zurückzuführen ist. 
 
Zur  Untersuchung  der  Wandkonstruktion  sowie  der  Schäden  und  der 
Verwitterungsmerkmale wurden klassische  und neu entwickelte Methoden  angewandt. Als 
klassische  Methoden   können  gelten:  Photogrammetrie,  Dünnschliffuntersuchungen, 
Messungen  der  Ultraschallgeschwindigkeiten,  Bestimmung  der  Feuchte  und  des 
Salzgehaltes  (Mauerwerks und Mörtel) sowie die Bestimmung des  nicht‐karbonatischen 
Anteils (Tonminerale, Quarz, Feldspäte). 
 
Alle erhobenen Daten wurden in einem neu entwickelten Ka rtiers ys tem  eingegeben, das 
statistische  Berechnungen  über  die  Zusammenhänge   zwischen  den  verschiedenen 
e Ergebnisse in entsprechenden Graphen darstellt. ermittelten Pa rametern  generiert und di
Die   Auswertung ergibt, dass   mehr als  85  %  der  vier untersuchten  Wandpartien aus 
unterschiedlichen  Faziestypen  des   eozänen  Kalks teins   erbaut  wurden,  der  aus  der 
unmittelbaren Umgebung von  Cl uj  stammt (Cluj Kalkstein). Etwa 9 % der Wandpartien 
r Umgebung anstehenden wurden aus quarzreichem Kalksandstein erbaut, der aus der in de
Feleac Formation stammt. Der Rest (etwa  6 %) besteht aus großflächigen und vol uminösen 
Mörtelausfüllungen, Ziegelsteinen und Holz. 
Der  Cluj  Kal kstein   wurde auf einer flachmarinen  Karbonatplattform im ausgedehnten 
transylvanischen Becken während des  Eozän‐Oligozän gebildet und weist eine komplexe 
Zusammensetzung aus überwiegend karbonatischen  und untergeordnet siliziklastischen 
uarz, Feldspäte, Tonminerale) auf. Die  Menge  und die Zusammensetzung der Anteilen (Q
nicht‐karbonatischen, siliziklastischen Anteile steuert vor allem  die Farbe. die technischen 
Eigenschaften und das Verwitterungsverhalten der Kalks teine. 
15  verschiedene  Mi krofa ziestypen   des  Cl uj‐Kal ksteins   konnten  mittels   der 
Dünnschliffanalyse  unterschieden werden (mudstone ‐wackestone, wackestone ‐packstone, 
packstone,  packstone‐grainstone,  grainstone‐packstone‐wackestone ‐alternation,  und 
grainstone) 
 
iii  Dimension stones of the city wall of Cluj‐Napoca, Romania                                                       Zusammenfassung                                       
 
Die  biogenen und abiogenen  Komponenten   dieser  Kalke  setzen sich überwiegend aus 
Foramini feren  und Molluskenbruchstücken sowie aus Ooiden  und Peloiden zusammen. Die 
mikritische   Ma tri x enthält  dabei  nicht  unwesentliche   Anteile an nicht‐karbonatischem 
Material,  in  dem  auch  quellfähige  Tonminerale  auftreten  (Montmorillonit, 
Wechsellagerungsphasen), wie  sie von  tertiären  Kalken  dieses Ablagerungsraumes  generell 
e Menge  diese quellfähigen Anteile von der Wasserenergie  im beschrieben werden. Da  di
Ablagerungsraum gesteuert wird, ist sie in grainstones kaum vorhanden und in matrix‐
gestützten Kalken  (mudstones, wackestones) häufig. Die  oft nur schwache Bindung der 
Allocheme (geringe Zementation) in den Kalks teinen  macht sie besonders  anfällig für die 
unterschiedlichen Verwitterungseinflüsse. 
 
 
ftverschmutzung  durch  die  umliegende  Industrie  bedingen  die Das   Klima  und  die  Lu
Gesamtsituation der historischen Stadtmauer. Die  extremen Temperaturunterschiede, der 
jährliche Niederschlag, der für eine konstant hohe Feuchtigkeit im Bauwerk sorgt und die 
aus W‐SW  vorherrs chenden   Winde haben einen direkten  Einfluss auf die  historische 
Stadtmauer. Die  Luftverschmutzung  trägt wesentlich zur Verwitterung bei. Die Gehalte an 
, NO  und von in Suspension transportierter Pa rtikeln  haben direkten Einfluss  auf die SO2 x
verschiedenen Verwitterungsprozesse. 
Bereits  die „Schall‐Kartierung“ mittels Hammerschlag ergeben, dass etwa 58 % der Steine 
(dumpfer  Klang)   verschiedene  Verwitterungsphänomene   aufweisen  und  einer 
Restaurierung bedürfen. Etwa 15 % weisen intensive Schäden auf und sollten vollständig 
r  verwendeten Steinblöcke   weisen  mäßige ersetzt  werden.  Ein  Viertel  (etwa   23 %) de
Schäden auf und sollten partiell restauriert werden. Die  Ka rtierung  der Feuchte weist einen 
Durchschnittswert  von  86.4  units  auf, was  auf die konstante  Feuchte im  Mauerwerk 
hinweist. Dabei  sind die unteren und mittleren Teile der Ma uer mit kapillar aufsteigendem 
flusst. Wasser und die oberen Teile durch Regenwasser beein
Die  Schadenskartierung weist 28 unterschiedliche Verwitterungsprozesse nach, die zum 
Zerfall  der  Steine  beitragen.  Sie  gehören  in  die  übergeordneten  Ka tegorien  von 
Entfärbungen,  Materialablagerungen,  Schuppen‐Ablösungen,  Absanden,  Rissen  und 
Deformationen. 
Die   verschiedenen  Faziestypen  der  Kalks teine   bedingen  dabei  ganz  spezifische 
Verwitterungsmerkmale,  wie  besonders  mittels  der  Dünnschliffanalyse  nachgewiesen 
r mikritischen Ma tri x treten lokal auf. Die werden kann. Beimischungen von Quarz in de
frühe Lösung  aragonitischer Pa rti kel  und von mikritischer Ma tri x und das Ausbrechen von 
Lithoklasten  führen  zur  Bildung  von  Lösungshohlräumen  und  lokal  zur  Bildung  von 
Mikroporosität.  In  vollständig  zersetzen  meist  oberflächennahen  Bereichen  sind 
abgespaltene Teile meist durch eine Mischung von Mikrit/Silt/Ton/Gips/Calcit noch an den 
n  Stein  angebunden  und  bilden  häufig schwarze  Krusten.  Die  schwärzenden gesunde
Partikel  sind  dabei auf industrielle  Einflüsse in  der  Luftverschmutzung zurückzuführen. 
Lokal können auch ungeeignete Restaurierungs versuche  zu  dem Schadensbild beitragen. 
Die  Insolation,  die  damit  verbundene  thermische   Ausdehnung  und  die  Bildung  von 
oberflächenparallelen  Rissen  an  der  Kal ksteinoberfläche   führten  zum  Wachstum  von 
n Rissen. Diese  Risse umlaufen häufig größere Partikel. Ferner treten Gipskristallen in de
auch Risse auf, die senkrecht in die Oberfläche  der Blöcke  eindringen und im Inneren 
auskeilen. Alte  Risse, die meist wieder verheilt sind, und die das Gestein in alle Richtungen 
durchziehen können, entstanden  während der geologischen Geschichte  (Kompaktion). 
iv 

Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.