Genome folding at the 30 nm scale [Elektronische Ressource] / presented by Philipp M. Diesinger

De
Dissertationsubmitted to theCombined Faculties for the Natural Sciences and for Mathematicsof the Ruperto-Carola University of Heidelberg, Germanyfor the degree ofDoctor of Natural Sciencespresented byDipl. Phys. Philipp M. Diesingerborn in Kleinblittersdorf, GermanyOral examination: June 17th, 20092Genome Foldingat the 30nm ScaleReferees: Prof. Dr. Dieter W. HeermannProf. Dr. Christoph Cremer34Genomorganisation auf der 30nm SkalaIn dieser Arbeit wurde eine grundlegende Frage der Genomorganisation beantwortet, indemgezeigt wurde, dass eine Struktur h oherer Ordnung nach dem Nukleosom, d.h. Chromatin,tats achlich existiert. Ein Chromatin-Modell wurde entwickelt, das die Untersuchung sehr langerStrukturen (im Bereich von Mega-Basenpaaren) erlaubt. Des Weiteren wurde zum ersten Maldie Abl osung von Linker Histonen und ganzen Nukleosomen in ein Chromatin-Modell inte-griert. Dies erlaubt die Untersuchung des Chromatin-Phasendiagramms. Die darin enthalte-nen Strukturen werden vor dem Hintergrund von DNA-Kompakti zierung und -Zug anglichkeitsowie anderer wichtiger Chromatineigenschaften diskutiert. Die Verteilungen der Modellpa-rameter stammen aus experimentellen Daten [186; 187]. Zusammen mit den Abl osungse ektenzeigen sie, dass jede Chromatinkonformation aus einer Verteilung von verschiedenen Strukturenbesteht. Dies erkl art, warum es experimentell so schwierig ist, regul are 30nm Fasern zu nden.
Publié le : jeudi 1 janvier 2009
Lecture(s) : 33
Tags :
Source : ARCHIV.UB.UNI-HEIDELBERG.DE/VOLLTEXTSERVER/VOLLTEXTE/2009/9596/PDF/DISSERTATION_DIESINGER.PDF
Nombre de pages : 351
Voir plus Voir moins

Dissertation
submitted to the
Combined Faculties for the Natural Sciences and for Mathematics
of the Ruperto-Carola University of Heidelberg, Germany
for the degree of
Doctor of Natural Sciences
presented by
Dipl. Phys. Philipp M. Diesinger
born in Kleinblittersdorf, Germany
Oral examination: June 17th, 20092Genome Folding
at the 30nm Scale
Referees: Prof. Dr. Dieter W. Heermann
Prof. Dr. Christoph Cremer
34Genomorganisation auf der 30nm Skala
In dieser Arbeit wurde eine grundlegende Frage der Genomorganisation beantwortet, indem
gezeigt wurde, dass eine Struktur h oherer Ordnung nach dem Nukleosom, d.h. Chromatin,
tats achlich existiert. Ein Chromatin-Modell wurde entwickelt, das die Untersuchung sehr langer
Strukturen (im Bereich von Mega-Basenpaaren) erlaubt. Des Weiteren wurde zum ersten Mal
die Abl osung von Linker Histonen und ganzen Nukleosomen in ein Chromatin-Modell inte-
griert. Dies erlaubt die Untersuchung des Chromatin-Phasendiagramms. Die darin enthalte-
nen Strukturen werden vor dem Hintergrund von DNA-Kompakti zierung und -Zug anglichkeit
sowie anderer wichtiger Chromatineigenschaften diskutiert. Die Verteilungen der Modellpa-
rameter stammen aus experimentellen Daten [186; 187]. Zusammen mit den Abl osungse ekten
zeigen sie, dass jede Chromatinkonformation aus einer Verteilung von verschiedenen Strukturen
besteht. Dies erkl art, warum es experimentell so schwierig ist, regul are 30nm Fasern zu nden.
Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Histonabl osungen die Eigenschaften von Chromatin massiv bee-
in ussen. Nukleosomabl osung kann einerseits zu einem Chromatinkollabs, andererseits aber
auch zum Anschwellen von Chromatin fuhren und der vorhergesagte Bereich optimaler DNA-
Kompakti zierung stimmt exakt mit experimentellen Daten [187] ub erein. Au erdem zeigt das
Modell gute Ubereinstimmung mit vielen experimentell bestimmten Chromatineigenschaften.
Ein Vergleich mit Daten aus 5C-Experimenten [72] belegt, dass Histonabl osung eine wichtige
Chromatineigenschaft ist, da nur Fasern mit Abl osungense ekten die wichtigen physikalischen
Kontakte auf der kleinen L angenskala aufweisen. Zuf allige Chromatinkontakte werden theo-
retisch untersucht, um 3C-basierte Technologien dadurch zu verbessern, dass pr aziser zwischen
Zufallskontakten und spezi schen Kontakten der DNA unterschieden werden kann.
Gro e Teile dieser Arbeit wurden bereits ver o entlicht [63; 64], werden zur Zeit gepruf t [65; 66]
oder fur eine Ver o entlichung vorbereitet [26; 27; 67; 68].
Genome Folding at the 30nm Scale
This thesis addressed and succeeded in answering a fundamental question concerning genome
folding at the 30nm scale by proving that a higher-order DNA folding pattern beyond the nu-
cleosome, i.e. chromatin, actually exists. A model for chromatin was developed that allows to
study very long bers (in the range of Mega base pairs). Furthermore, linker histone depletion
as well as nucleosome depletion have been included for the rst time in a chromatin model. This
allowed to study the chromatin phase diagram and the corresponding structures are discussed
against the background of compaction and DNA accessibility and other important chromatin
features. The basic model parameter distributions come from experimental data [186; 187]. To-
gether with the histone depletion e ects they show that every chromatin conformation consists
of a distribution of di erent structures. This explains why regular 30nm bers are so hard to
nd experimentally. The results show that histone depletion massively a ects the properties
of chromatin. Nucleosome depletion can either lead to a collapse or to swelling of chromatin
and the predicted regime of optimal DNA condensation coincides with experimental data [187]
which proves that histone depletion is used as a regulatory tool for DNA extension. Moreover,
the model is in good agreement with many experimentally determined chromatin properties. A
comparison of the developed model with 5C experimental data [72] proves that histone deple-
tion is an important chromatin feature because only bers with depletion allow the important
physical contacts on a small length scale. Random chromatin collisions are theoretically stud-
ied to improve 3C-based experimental technologies by allowing to distinguish more accurately
between speci c and random DNA contacts.
Major parts of this work have already been published [63; 64] are currently under revision
[65; 66] or respectively under preparation [26; 27; 67; 68].
5Preface
The results which will be presented in this work have been developed between February
2006 and March 2009, i.e. the time of my PhD studies at the Institute of Theoretical
Physics, University of Heidelberg.
A brief outline of this thesis will be given below. A more detailed overview can be
found at the beginning of each chapter.
Outline
Chapter 1 will provide some basic concepts of the statistical mechanics of polymers and
introduce some mathematical tools which will be used frequently in this work. After
that, chapter 2 will introduce chromatin and give an overview over the problems and
fundamental questions concerning genome folding with focus on the small length scale.
In Chapter 3 my part in a collaboration project with the group of Prof. Cremer at
the Kirchho -Institute for Physics (University of Heidelberg) will be described. The
analysis of the localization microscopic data in this section will show that a higher order
folding pattern beyond the nucleosome exists.
Chapter 4 will describe the geometric modelling of the 30nm ber by an improved
two-angle model and in the succeeding chapter 5 the chromatin phase diagram will be
discussed comprehensively. After that, c 6 will again deal with modelling issues.
This time the focus will lie on ber exibility and the question how histone depletion
can be allowed for.
Then the results of the chromatin simulations will be presented in chapters 7 and 8.
After that, chapter 9 will deal with a completely di erent topic resulting from a collabo-
ration with the group of Dirk Gor lich at the MPI in G ottingen namely the nuclear pore
complex and the matter whether or not nucleoporins can form hydro-gels in particular.
In the nal chapter 10 the connection between polymer loops, the scattering function
and the mean Average Crossing Number will be discussed.
Some supplemental gures and tables are only presented in the appendix of this work.
They can be found in App. A respectively App. B.
An electronic version of this thesis in pdf format is available in App. I.
Major parts of this thesis have already been published in scienti c journals. Further-
more, several results of this work have been presented at scienti c conferences and
workshops. App. J provides an overview over these publications.
A comprehensive list of all gures as well as a list of the tables is given in App. K
respectively in App. L.
6"Art is science made clear."
- Wilson Mizner
7Contents
Abstract 5
Preface 6
Table of Contents 8
1 Basic Polymer Physics 12
1.1 Statistical Mechanics of Long Chain Molecules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.2 The Freely-Jointed Chain Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.2.2 Mathematical Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.3 The Worm-Like Chain Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1.4 Free Energy of Distorting a Polymer Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1.4.1 Free Energy of Pulling a Polymer Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1.4.2 Freely-Jointed Chain under Length Constraint . . . . . . . . . . 23
1.5 The Gaussian Chain Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1.6 The Self-Avoiding Walk in Polymer Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
1.7 Ideal Chains and the -Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1.8 Scattering Function and Pair Distribution Function . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2 Background - Introducing Chromatin 32
2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.2 Genome Folding - Spatial Organization of DNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.2.1 DNA Organization at the 10nm Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.2.2 DNA at the 30nm Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.3 The Role of Chromatin for DNA-Protein Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.4 Epigenetic Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.5 Purpose of the Chromatin Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
2.6 Salt-Concentration and the Entry-Exit-Angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.7 DNA Organization at Larger Scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3 SPDM Nanostructure Examination of Chromatin 48
3.1 Project Background and Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.2 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.3 Experimental Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.4 Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
3.4.1 Noise Repression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
3.4.2 Block Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.5 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.5.1 Histone H2B Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.5.2 Global Distance Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.5.3 Chromatin Nanostructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
84 Modelling Chromatin I - Geometry of the 30nm-Fiber 68
4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.3 The Two-Angle Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.3.1 Basic De nitions of the Two-Angle Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.3.2 Mathematical De nition of the Two-Angle Model . . . . . . . . . 70
4.3.3 Properties of the Tw Model . . . . . . . . 70
4.4 The E2A Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
4.4.1 Basic Notations of the E2A Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.4.2 De nition of the Two-Angle Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.5 Construction of the Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.5.1 Start of the Iteration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.5.2 Calculation of N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77i+1
4.5.3 of and p^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770 i+1
4.5.4 DNA Trajectory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.6 Potentials and Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.6.1 Volume Exclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.6.2 DNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.6.3 Coulomb Repulsion of DNA Linkers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.6.4 Nucleosome Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5 Chromatin Phase Diagram 86
5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
5.2 The Chromatin Phase Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
5.3 Chromatin Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
5.3.1 Planar Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
5.3.2 Three-Dimensional Chromatin Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.4 Excluded Volume Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.4.1 Some Basic Estimations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.4.2 Calculation of the Excluded Volume Borderline () . . . . . . . 97
5.4.3 Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
5.4.4 In uence of Cylindrically Shaped Nucleosomes and Pitch . . . . 105
5.5 Chromatin Density and Fiber Accessibility in the Phase Diagram . . . . 107
5.5.1 Spherical Nucleosomes without Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
5.5.2 Cylindrical with Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
5.6 Distribution of Non-Regular Chromatin Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
6 Modelling Chromatin II - Flexibility and Depletion E ects 122
6.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.2 Linker Histone Depletion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.2.1 Simulation of Linker Histone Skips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
6.2.2 Chromatin Fibers with Linker Histone Skips . . . . . . . . . . . 125
6.3 Parameter Distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
6.3.1 Nucleosome Repeat Length Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
6.3.2 Local Parameter Distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
92 26.3.3 Scaling of R and R for Flexible Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135g
6.4 Nucleosome Depletion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
6.4.1 Modelling of Nucleosome Skips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
6.4.2 The Average Occupancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
6.5 Some First Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
6.5.1 Flexible Chromatin Fibers without Depletion Eects . . . . . . . 143
6.5.2 Fibers with E ects . . . . . . . . . 145
6.5.3 Comparison with Electron Micrographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
7 In uence of Histone Depletion on Chromatin Properties 150
7.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.2 Chromatin Extension and Flexibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.2.1 Linker Histone Depletion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
7.2.2 Nucleosome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
7.3 Chromatin Nanostructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.3.1 Radial Nucleosome Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.3.2 The Pair Function . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
7.3.3 Pair Distribution Function of 2D Chromatin Fibers . . . . . . . . 165
7.3.4 Comparison with SPDM Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
7.4 Comparison with Experimental Distance Measurements . . . . . . . . . 167
8 Chromatin Loops 172
8.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
8.2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.2.1 Loop Formations during Transcription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.2.2 Chromatin Interaction Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.2.3 The Role of Random Chromatin Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . 175
8.3 Chromatin Loop Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
8.3.1 Modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
8.3.2 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
8.4 Comparison with 5C Experiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
8.4.1 3C-Based Methods to Capture DNA Interactions . . . . . . . . . 184
8.4.2 Comparison of Loop Occurrence with 5C Measurements . . . . . 186
8.5 Chromatin Loop Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
8.5.1 Loop Number Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
8.5.2 Loop Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
8.5.3 Wang-Uhlenbeck Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9 Gelation of Nucleoporins 204
9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.2 Hydrophobicity induced Gelation of FG-rich Nucleoporins . . . . . . . . 210
9.2.1 Sol-Gel Transition as a Percolation Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
9.2.2 Percolation Theoretical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
9.2.3 Description of the Nucleoporin Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
9.3 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
10

Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.