Gravitational lensing [Elektronische Ressource] : an advanced method to recover the mass distribution of galaxy clusters / put forward by Julian Merten

De
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität HeidelbergFakultät für Physik und Astronomie-Gravitational Lensing-An advanced method to recoverthe mass distribution of galaxy clustersJulian MertenAdvisors:Matthias BartelmannMassimo MeneghettiHeidelberg & Bologna, March/April 2010Dissertationsubmitted to theCombined Faculties of the Natural Sciences and Mathematicsof the Ruperto-Carola-University of Heidelberg, Germanyfor the degree ofDoctor of Natural SciencesPut forward byJulian Mertenborn in: Hammelburg, GermanyrdOral examination: 23 of June, 2010.–Gravitational Lensing–An advanced method to recover the mass distribution ofgalaxy clustersReferees:Prof. Dr. Matthias Bartelmann (ITA Heidelberg)Prof. Dr. Hans-Walter Rix (MPIAg)Über eine effiziente Methode zur Massenprofilrekonstruktion vonGalaxienhaufenDie vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit Galaxienhaufen. Diese massereichsten, gravita-tiv gebundenen Objekte im beobachtbaren Universum repräsentieren das obere Ende derMassenfunktion und sind von speziellem Interesse für die Kosmologie. Nicht nur lassen sichmehrere kosmologische Parameter aus der Beobachtung und vor allem aus der Massenbes-timmung von Galaxienhaufen ableiten, sie stellen auch ideale kosmische Laboratorien dar,welche einen direkten Vergleich zwischen und numerischer Simulation erlauben.Die vielleicht vielversprechendste Methode um die Eigenschaften von Galaxienhaufen zuermitteln ist der Gravitationslinseneffekt.
Publié le : vendredi 1 janvier 2010
Lecture(s) : 12
Tags :
Source : D-NB.INFO/1004104669/34
Nombre de pages : 184
Voir plus Voir moins

Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie
-Gravitational Lensing-
An advanced method to recover
the mass distribution of galaxy clusters
Julian MertenAdvisors:
Matthias Bartelmann
Massimo Meneghetti
Heidelberg & Bologna, March/April 2010Dissertation
submitted to the
Combined Faculties of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics
of the Ruperto-Carola-University of Heidelberg, Germany
for the degree of
Doctor of Natural Sciences
Put forward by
Julian Merten
born in: Hammelburg, Germany
rdOral examination: 23 of June, 2010.–Gravitational Lensing–
An advanced method to recover the mass distribution of
galaxy clusters
Referees:
Prof. Dr. Matthias Bartelmann (ITA Heidelberg)
Prof. Dr. Hans-Walter Rix (MPIAg)Über eine effiziente Methode zur Massenprofilrekonstruktion von
Galaxienhaufen
Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit Galaxienhaufen. Diese massereichsten, gravita-
tiv gebundenen Objekte im beobachtbaren Universum repräsentieren das obere Ende der
Massenfunktion und sind von speziellem Interesse für die Kosmologie. Nicht nur lassen sich
mehrere kosmologische Parameter aus der Beobachtung und vor allem aus der Massenbes-
timmung von Galaxienhaufen ableiten, sie stellen auch ideale kosmische Laboratorien dar,
welche einen direkten Vergleich zwischen und numerischer Simulation erlauben.
Die vielleicht vielversprechendste Methode um die Eigenschaften von Galaxienhaufen zu
ermitteln ist der Gravitationslinseneffekt. Das Licht entfernter Hintergrundgalaxien wird auf-
grund der hohen Massekonzentration in einem Galaxienhaufen auf dem Weg zum Beobachter
abgelenkt und trägt daher Informationen über den Deflektor. In dieser Arbeit entwickeln
wir eine neue, moderne Methode welche den sogenannten starken und schwachen Grav-
itationslinseneffekt optimal kombiniert und daher eine nichtparametrische Rekonstruktion
der Massenverteilung des Deflektors erlaubt. Diese Methode ist in einem fortschrittlichen
numerischen Algorithmus implementiert, welcher effiziente numerische Verfahren und par-
allele Höchstleistungs-Computersysteme ausnutzt.
Mit Rekonstruktionen numerisch simulierter Galaxienhaufen zeigen wir die Leistungsfähigkeit
unserer Methode, im Vergleich mit etablierten Techniken. Wir schließen unsere Arbeit mit
Rekonstruktion und Analyse von MS2137.3-2353 und CL0024+1654, zweier wohlbekannter
Galaxienhaufen die spektakuläre Phänomene des starken Gravitationslinseneffektes aufweisen.
An advanced method to recover the mass distribution of
galaxy clusters
This work shall be on clusters of galaxies. Those most massive, gravitationally bound objects
in the observable Universe represent the high-mass tail of the mass function, rendering them
as objects of interest for cosmology. Not only that they allow for the derivation of several
cosmological parameters, but they are also ideal cosmic laboratories. Direct comparisons
between numerical simulations and observations are particularly appealing in the case of
clusters, as we will show.
Maybe the most promising method to derive cluster properties from observations is grav-
itational lensing. Light rays of distant background sources are bent on the way to the ob-
server, due to the high mass concentrations of clusters, and thereby carry important infor-
mation about the deflector. In this work we develop an advanced, nonparametric method
to recover the mass distribution of galaxy clusters by combining weak and strong gravita-
tional lensing. The underlying numerical algorithm makes use of modern concepts of high-
performance computing and is fully parallelised.
We proof the capabilities of our method, compared to established methods, while re-
constructing simulated clusters of galaxies and capitalising realistic lensing scenarios. We
close our work with the reconstruction of two well-known, strongly clusters, namely
MS2137.3-2353 and CL0024+1654.And the sky is filled with light
Can you see it?
All the black is really white
If you believe it
As your time is running out
Let me take away your doubt
You can find a better a place
In this twilight
Trent ReznorviiiContents
Contents ix
List of Figures xiii
List of Tables xv
1 Introduction: Our picture of the Universe 1
2 Gravitational Lensing 5
2.1 Basic theory of lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.1.1 Thin screen approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.1.2 The lens equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.1.3 The lensing potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.2 Weak lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.2.1 Complex spin fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.2.2 Lens mapping of extended sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2.3 Shear and flexion in reality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3 Strong lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.3.1 Critical lens mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.3.2 A spherical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.3.3 Observables in elliptical models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3 Clusters of Galaxies 21
3.1 Cosmological structure formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.1.1 The homogeneous Universe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.1.2 Linear structure formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.1.3 Non-linear structure formation and numerical simulations . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.2 Observations of galaxy clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.2.1 Optical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.2.2 X-ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.2.3 Microwave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.3 Constraining the universe with galaxy clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.3.1 Mass function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.3.2 Evolution of the mass function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.3.3 Individual systems as cosmological laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4 A joint reconstruction method 43
4.1 A grid-based maximum-likelihood approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.1.1 The discretised lensing potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.1.2 Combining different constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.1.3 Connecting the observables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2 Weak lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
ixCONTENTS
24.2.1 Defining a -function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.2.2 Problems with weak lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.3 Flexion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
24.3.1 Defining a -function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.2 Problems with flexion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.4 Strong lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
24.4.1 Defining -functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.4.2 Problems with strong lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
4.5 Advantages and problems of the approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.6 Additional constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5 Implementation 63
5.1 Modern high-performance computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
5.1.1 Single node computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.1.2 Cluster computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
5.1.3 GPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2 Adaptively refined grids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.1 Refinement criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2.2 Pixel indexing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
5.2.3 Noise-reduced finite differencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.3 Constraints translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.3.1 Adaptive shape averaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.3.2 Covariances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.3.3 Strong lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
25.4 -minimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.4.1 Linearisation in grid space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.4.2 Speeding things up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
5.4.3 Solving the LSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5.5 An iterative approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5.5.1 Regularisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5.5.2 Outer-level iteration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
5.5.3 Inner-level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
5.6 A complete reconstruction package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
5.6.1 A summary: From the input to the result . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
5.6.2 Analysing the result . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
5.6.3 Concrete implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6 Proofs of concept 91
6.1 Galaxy associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.1.1 Producing a synthetic catalogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.1.2 Runtime results and conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
6.2 Building up the coefficient matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
6.2.1 A toy problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.2.2 Runtime results and conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.3 Reconstruction of idealised input data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.3.1 Synthetic catalogues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.3.2 Results and conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
x

Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.