On the mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching in plants and diatoms [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Yuliya Miloslavina

De
    ON THE MECHANISMS OF NON­PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING IN PLANTS AND DIATOMS   Inaugural‐Dissertation  zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades der Mathematisch‐Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf   vorgelegt von Yuliya Miloslavina aus Valujki   November 2008 Aus dem Max‐Planck‐Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie                    Gedruckt mit der Genehmigung der Mathematisch‐Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf  Referent: Prof. Dr. A.R. Holzwarth Koreferent: Prof. Dr. K. Kleinermans Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 28. November 2008                Life is a miracle     For my dear parents and for you, with gratitudeTABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................................................................8 ZUSAMMENFASSUNG ................. 11 ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS............................................................. 14 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION INTO PHOTOSYNTHESIS .................................................... 17 PIGMENTS ...................................................................................................................................................... 18 Chlorophylls ......................................................................................................................................... 18 Carotenoids ..........
Publié le : mardi 1 janvier 2008
Lecture(s) : 37
Tags :
Source : DOCSERV.UNI-DUESSELDORF.DE/SERVLETS/DERIVATESERVLET/DERIVATE-10747/THESIS%2031C.PDF
Nombre de pages : 188
Voir plus Voir moins

  
 
 
ON THE MECHANISMS 
OF NON­PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING 
IN PLANTS AND DIATOMS   
Inaugural‐Dissertation 
 
zur 
Erlangung des Doktorgrades der 
Mathematisch‐Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät 
der Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf 
 
 
vorgelegt von 
Yuliya Miloslavina 
aus Valujki 
 
 
November 2008 Aus dem Max‐Planck‐Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie                    Gedruckt mit der Genehmigung der Mathematisch‐Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf  Referent: Prof. Dr. A.R. Holzwarth Koreferent: Prof. Dr. K. Kleinermans Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 28. November 2008   
 
  
 
  
 
 
  
 
  
Life is a miracle   
 
 
For my dear parents and for you, 
with gratitudeTABLE OF CONTENTS 
SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................................................................8 ZUSAMMENFASSUNG ................. 11 ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS............................................................. 14 
CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION INTO PHOTOSYNTHESIS .................................................... 17 PIGMENTS ...................................................................................................................................................... 18 
Chlorophylls ......................................................................................................................................... 18 
Carotenoids ........... 19 
Binding of pigments.......................................................................................................................... 21 THYLAKOID MEMBRANE IN HIGHER PLANTS ............................................................................................. 21 PHOTOSYSTEM I ............................................................................................................................................ 23 PHOTOSYSTEM II ........................................................................... 25 
Photosystem II core .......................................................................................................................... 25 
PS II supercompex ............................................................................................................................. 26 
PS II kinetics ......................................................................................................................................... 28 
Exciton/radical pair equilibrium model .................................................................................. 28 
Other models ......... 29 
CHAPTER 2. INTRODUCTION INTO NON­PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING 
PROCESSES ........ 31 ΔPH ................................................................................................................................................................ 33 XANTHOPHYLL CYCLE .................................................................... 33 PSBS PROTEIN ................................................................................. 35 MAJOR LIGHT‐HARVESTING ANTENNA OF PS II (LHC II) ..................................................................... 36 MINOR LIGHT‐HARVESTING COMPLEXES ................................................................................................... 38 PRESENT HYPOTHESES FOR THE QE QUENCHING MECHANISM .............................................................. 3 9  
Zeaxanthin as a direct quencher ................................................................................................. 39 
PsbS as a direct quencher .............................................................................................................. 39 
Minor antenna as the site of qE ................................................................................................... 40 
Conformational change in LHC II ............................................................................................... 40 
PS II RC is the site of qE ................................................................................................................... 41 NON‐PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING IN DIATOMS ..................................................................................... 41 
CHAPTER 3. MAIN AIMS OF THE THESIS ............................................................................... 45 SUMMARY OF OPEN QUESTIONS .................................................................................................................. 48   5CHAPTER 4. MATERIALS AND METHODS .............................................................................. 49 SINGLE PHOTON TIMING ............................................................................................................................. 49 
The principle of single photon timing ........................................................................................ 49 
Laser system ......................................................................................................................................... 52 
Detection electronics ........................................................................................................................ 52 
Data analysis ......... 53 PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SAMPLES ............................................................................ 57 
PS II core particles from cyanobacteria ................................................................................... 57 
PS II enriched membranes (BBYs) .............................................................................................. 58 
LHC II trimers and aggregates ..................................................................................................... 59 
Arabidopsis thaliana plants ........................................................................................................... 60 
Fluorescence kinetics ........................................................................................................................ 62 
Diatoms ................................................................................................................................................... 64 
CHAPTER 5. CHARGE SEPARATION KINETICS IN PHOTOSYSTEM II CORE 
PARTICLES ......... 67 RESULTS ........................................................................................................................................................ 67 
Fluorescence decay kinetics ........................................................................................................... 67 
Kinetic Modeling ................................................................................................................................. 69 DISCUSSION ...................... 72 
Kinetic model ......... 72 
Trap­limit versus transfer­to­the­trap limit ........................................................................... 75 CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 77 
CHAPTER 6. ENERGY TRANSFER AND CHARGE SEPARATION KINETICS IN 
PHOTOSYSTEM II ENRICHED MEMBRANE PARTICLES ..................................................... 79 RESULTS ........................................................................................................................................................ 79 
Fluorescence decays and kinetic modeling ............................................................................. 79 
Theoretical modeling ........................................................................................................................ 86 DISCUSSION ...................... 93 
Energy transfer and trapping kinetics ...................................................................................... 94 
Comparison with cyanobacterial PS II cores .......................................................................... 97 
Relevance and limitations of the early ERPE model for higher plant PS II ............... 99 
A “second generation ERPE model” ......................................................................................... 101 CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 105 
CHAPTER 7. QUENCHING IN ISOLATED LHC II OLIGOMERS ......................................... 107 
Pigment content ............................................................................................................................... 107 
6   Global lifetime analysis of the fluorescence kinetics ........................................................ 108 
Target analysis of the kinetics ................................................................................................... 110 DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................................ 114 
CHAPTER 8. NON­PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING IN INTACT PLANT LEAVES ....... 119 RESULTS ......................... 120 
Fluorescence decays in quenched and unquenched conditions ................................... 120 
Evidence for the necessity of the additional component ................................................ 127 
Pigment content ............................................................................................................................... 130 DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................................ 131 
Origin and differentiation of the fluorescence components .......................................... 131 
Two sites and mechanisms of non­photochemical quenching ..................................... 133 
CHAPTER 9. QUENCHING IN MINOR ANTENNA MUTANTS ............................................ 137 RESULTS ...................................................................................................................................................... 137 
Fluorescence decays in quenched and unquenched conditions ................................... 137 
Target compartment modeling ................................................................................................. 139 DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................................ 143 
CHAPTER 10. NON­PHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING IN DIATOMS ............................... 147 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ........................................................................................................................ 147 
Fluorescence induction ................................................................................................................. 147 
Oxygen evolution and de­epoxidation state ......................................................................... 150 
Ultrafast fluorescence decay kinetics...................................................................................... 152 
Global target analysis .................................................................................................................... 153 
The NPQ quenching model .......................................................................................................... 160 
CHAPTER 11. CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................... 163 
REFERENCES .................................................................................................................................. 168 LIST OF PUBLICATIONS ....................................................................................................................................... 187 SPECIAL THANKS .................... 188 

  7SUMMARY 
Photosynthetic organisms possess a highly efficient photo‐protective apparatus respon‐sible for non‐photochemical quenching (NPQ) of the excess excitation energy that helps them to minimize the harmful effects of excess light. The rapidly‐reversible part of NPQ, termed qE, is associated with a number of different factors: the pH gradient across the thylakoid  membrane,  the  action  of  the  PsbS  protein,  the  xanthophyll  cycle  conversion, i.e.  de‐epoxidation  of  violaxanthin  into  zeaxanthin  (Zx),  conformational  changes  in  the light‐harvesting complexes of PS II (LHC II). The exact mechanism of qE is however not known, the quenching sites, their location and molecular origin remain questionable.  These questions are addressed in the thesis by time‐resolved fluorescence spectroscopy performed  on  different  levels  of  organization  and  physiological state of the photosyn‐thetic apparatus – from isolated pigment‐protein complexes to intact leaves. The single photon counting technique was utilized for registering fluorescence emission with pico‐seconds time resolution and exceptionally high dynamic range and signal‐to‐noise ratio, allowing  a  detailed  multicomponent analysis of the fluorescence kinetics. For the first time  intact  plant  leaves  and  diatom  cells  (Bacillariophyceae)  were  measured in­vivo in NPQ state in physiological conditions. The successful analysis and interpretation of the extremely complex fluorescence decay kinetics of the intact system was made possible by combining the knowledge acquired in previous studies, reviewed in the introductory part of the thesis, together with the preliminary investigations in this work, performed on isolated PS II cores, PS II enriched thylakoid membranes, and isolated LHC II in dif‐ferent aggregation states.   
The gathered experimental data were thoroughly treated by applying a kinetic modeling (target analysis) approach in order to gain insight into the bi ophysical  parameters (energy and electron pathways, transfer and decay rate constants, species spectra that reveal the molecular nature of the fluorescence‐emitting components). Different kinetic models suitable for each particular experimental system were designed and applied to fit the data. In addition, in some instances theoretical modeling was applied, which re‐veals the contributions of the various intermediates to specific apparent lifetimes and al‐lows to estimate the time dependence of the populations of the intermediates. 
Considerable  similarities  in  the  early  electron  transfer  rates  of  PS  II  reaction  centres (RCs,  without  antenna),  cyanobacterial  PS  II  cores  (with  core  antenna),  and  a  higher plant  PS  II  enriched  membranes  (with  core  and  peripheral  antenna)  were  found.  The  8energy transfer rates scale with increase in the antenna size. Thus the dynamics of the initial photochemical steps of PS II could be implemented in the model describing the in­
vivo fluorescence as well. 
Fluorescence time‐resolved kinetics was measured in vivo from leaves of Arabidopsis in unquenched  dark‐adapted  states  with  open  and  closed  RCs  (F  and F ,  respectively) 0 maxand compared to the kinetics measured under quenched light‐adapted condition (F ). NPQThe data were fit using a kinetic compartment model combining the previously investi‐gated energy and electron transfer dynamics in PS II and PS I. The results of the kinetic modeling revealed two principal changes in the fluorescence kinetics, signifying the gen‐eration of NPQ: 1) appearance of a new far‐red‐enhanced fluorescence component func‐tionally disconnected from either PS I or PS II and that was shown to originate from peripheral LHC II detached from  PS II; 2) increase of the non‐photochemical deactiva‐tion rate (k ) that is a direct measure of NPQ in the PS II‐attached antenna. Thus, NPQ Dwas found to consist of two separate mechanisms and sites of action, termed quenching site 1 and 2 (Q1 and Q2), respectively. These two quenching sites were further investi‐gated by analyzing the fluorescence kinetics in different Arabidopsis mutants lacking dif‐ferent  components  of  the  photosynthetic  apparatus  and  also  by  comparison  with isolated LHC II in vitro. 
The spectral features of the fluorescence of disconnected LHC II were reminiscent of the fluorescence of LHC II oligomers in vitro, therefore it was proposed that the Q1 site of quenching represents detached and oligomerized LHC II. Thus the NPQ‐associated addi‐tional  fluorescence  component  serves  as  a  spectroscopic  marker  for  the  formation  of LHC II oligomers in vivo. It is characterized by a spectrally broad and a strongly far‐red enhanced fluorescence spectrum. The far‐red emitting state is proposed to be an emis‐sive Chl‐Chl charge transfer state. The Q1 site of quenching was missing in the Arabidop­
sis  mutant npq4  lacking  PsbS  protein  but  was  enhanced  in  the  PsbS  overexpressing mutant (L17), therefore it was concluded that the role of PsbS in NPQ is to mediate the detachment and oligomerization of LHC II. 
The increase of the k  constant was not observed in the Arabidopsis mutant npq1 lacking DZx but was present in both npq4 and L17. Therefore the Q2 site is strictly dependent on Zx availability and does not depend on the action of PsbS. A study  of  minor  antenna knock‐out  mutants  –  koCP24,  koCP26  and  koCP24/koCP26  revealed  further  details  of the Q2 mechanism – CP24 is the most crucial minor antenna complex for the Q2 quench‐ing, whereas CP26 does not take part in it. 
  9In conclusion of the results obtained from the time‐resolved fluorescence analysis of in‐tact leaves, a new model of the qE mechanism in higher plants was  developed.  It  de‐scribes the location and molecular origin of the two quenching sites  that  work independently and complement each other. The research work on NPQ was extended to cover diatoms that represent a major part of the phytoplankton. We aimed to find differences in the NPQ mechanism in diatoms since they have a different structure of the thylakoid membrane, and completely different an‐tenna  compared  to  higher  plants.  Surprisingly,  despite  of  the  differences,  the  diatoms 
Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Cyclotella meneghiniana operated the same qE mechan‐ism with the same two quenching sites. As a result of the analysis of the diatom fluores‐cence kinetics under quenched and unquenched conditions, a model  for  the  NPQ  in diatoms  was  presented.  According  to  this  model  there  are  two  subpopulations  of  the light‐harvesting antenna (fucoxanthin‐chlorophyll‐binding protein, FCP). The Q1 site of quenching is located in FCP subpopulation II which is detached from PS II and oligome‐rized under high light intensities. The Q2 site takes place in FCP subpopulation I, which is  attached  to  PS  II.  Regardless  of  what  type  of  antenna  the  photosynthetic  organisms possess, they seem to utilize the same NPQ mechanisms which turn out to have univer‐sal character. 
 
 10

Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.