Academic exposé

Publié par

The Manitou is Revived Published March 7, 2008 The school newspaper, The Manitou, is back in print thanks to the dedicated efforts of a small group of diligent and talented students. Featuring stories on the successful NHS men’s hockey program, interviews with new faculty, and political and gastronomical topics, the publication is teeming with fun facts and interesting write ups. The Manitou staff consists of seniors Caitlyn Homer, Mike Helms, Jess Nissenbaum, Gunnar Hildebrand, Ali Gennaro, and Dana Buckley, and juniors Jeremy Wolff and Jake Lee. Faculty advisors are Peter Rowan and Martha Shepp. These students took on publishing the newspaper as an Academic extra-curricular endeavor, volunteering their time in addition to their numerous other commitments. A job well done and appreciated by the NHS community! Exposé The newspaper is available for download on the New Hampton School Web site. WINTER 2007-08 This collection of news articles was taken from New Hampton’s weekly e-newsletter and compiled by Academic Studies Offce the Academic Offce. These articles represent our belief Jennifer Berry ‘83, Director of Studies that students learn by authentic academic experiences within the context of relationships and community. Phone: 603.677.3505 jberry@newhampton.
Publié le : jeudi 21 juillet 2011
Lecture(s) : 280
Nombre de pages : 6
Voir plus Voir moins
This collection of news articles was taken from
New Hampton’s weekly e-newsletter and compiled by
the Academic Office. These articles represent our belief
that students learn by authentic academic experiences
within the context of relationships and community.
Academic
Exposé
WINTER 2007-08
Academic Studies Office
Jennifer Berry ‘83, Director of Studies
Phone: 603.677.3505
jberry@newhampton.org
The Manitou
is Revived
The school newspaper, The
Manitou
, is back in print thanks to
the dedicated efforts of a small group of diligent and talented
students. Featuring stories on the successful NHS men’s
hockey program, interviews with new faculty, and political
and gastronomical topics, the publication is teeming with fun
facts and interesting write ups.
The
Manitou
staff consists of seniors Caitlyn Homer, Mike
Helms, Jess Nissenbaum, Gunnar Hildebrand, Ali Gennaro,
and Dana Buckley, and juniors Jeremy Wolff and Jake Lee.
Faculty advisors are Peter Rowan and Martha Shepp.
These students took on publishing the newspaper as an
extra-curricular endeavor, volunteering their time in addition
to their numerous other commitments. A job well done and
appreciated by the NHS community!
The newspaper is available for download on the New
Hampton School Web site.
Published March 7, 2008
An artists’ reception earlier this week filled the Galletly
Gallery, as students and faculty came out to admire and
appreciate the results of fall term visual arts classes.
Student Art in Gallery Exhibition
Published December 14, 2007
The exhibition included exploratory to advanced level
work in a huge variety of media from Ms. Shepp’s
graphic design and advanced placement studio art
classes, Mr. Buck’s
studio classes,
and Ms. Wilson’s
photography classes.
Approximately
ninety students
exhibited their work.
A selection of student work displayed in
Galletly Gallery.
Published February 29, 2008
Language Study Overseas
New Hampton’s Foreign
Language Department hosted
a representative from the
Experiment in International
Living this week. The Vermont-
based nonprofit sends high
school students overseas to
twenty-eight different countries
around the world each summer.
Latin teacher Katherine Drennan said, “These programs are
an incredible opportunity for high school students to see the
world and experience something totally new. Traveling in this
capacity allows students the comfort of being with peers from
home while also fully immersing themselves in a new culture.
I strongly encourage all of our students to consider traveling
this summer.”
Students spend three to five weeks traveling with a group
of twelve to fifteen students. The first week is spent touring
the country’s capital, learning “survival language,” and
familiarizing themselves in the new country with their new
group. The next few weeks are spent in a smaller community,
where students live with local families to most fully integrate
into the new culture. The final week is spent doing community
service, working with local artists, or completing projects.
All language students received detailed information and
applications. Applications are due in early May, and financial
aid is available on a rolling basis. For more information,
please contact Ms. Drennan at (603) 677-3523; kdrennan@
newhampton.org.
Students have a hands on learning
experience.
Published February 22, 2008
Works as diverse as
The Ox-Bow Incident
and
The Electric Kool-
Aid Acid Test
are broadening the perspectives of Mr. Matthew
Lamotte’s U.S. History students. The books have been
added to the curriculum as a part of NHS’s ongoing effort
to cultivate and “cross-pollinate” learning outside of routine
classroom practices and topics.
Mr. LaMotte’s U.S. History classes recently read, wrote book
reports, and dedicated classroom discussion time to an in-
depth study of Walter Van Tilburg Clark’s 1940 novel,
The Ox-
Bow Incident
.
The unit added to class study of the settlement
of America’s western frontier during the late nineteenth
century.
“Students really got into the ‘message’ the author intended to
send to his readers,” LaMotte commented. “I was impressed
by how many expressed their feelings and emotions about
guilt, the ‘mob mentality,’ and the dangers of ‘frontier
justice.’ The class enjoyed looking at American history from a
different perspective.”
Next trimester, Mr. LaMotte’s AP U.S. History classes will
read two novels that provide very different perspectives on
American in the 1960s: Tom Wolfe’s counterculture classic,
The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
, and Tim O’Brian’s
If I Die in a
Combat Zone,
an autobiographical account of the author’s tour
of duty in Vietnam. Students will write reports and come
to class prepared to discuss how these books affected their
thinking about this period in American history.
Classic Literature
Integrated into History Curriculum
Published January 11, 2008
Presidential Primary: Practice and Applica
tion
Tuesday’s School Meeting featured History Department
Head John Cullinan’s discussion on primaries and
caucuses, and he also reviewed the candidates’ current
status in national polls. This was followed by the
announcement that New Hampton School would conduct
a mock primary at lunch. Voters cast 168 ballots that
represented 43 percent of the student body, and the Class
of 2010 had the highest participation rate (52 percent).
Hillary Clinton and John McCain may have won the
actual Democratic and Republican primaries, but the
mock, on-campus honors went to Barack Obama and Mitt
Romney by wide margins.
Director of the International Program Helen Clary
accompanied her fifteen international American Culture
students to New Hampton’s Town House, where they
observed the voting process in action. The South Korean
students were especially interested in the primary, as
their nation had recently elected a new president.
New Hampton School boarding students who met
voter registration criteria (over age 18, U.S. citizens,
and not participating in their local primaries) were also
given the opportunity to participate in the election and
transportation was provided.
International students visit New Hampton’s
historic Town House.
Published January 18, 2008
History Department Connects
Literature, Geography
All freshman World Geography and Cultures classes
recently finished reading,
A Long Way Gone
by Ishmael
Beah. This very moving story about life, hope, suffering,
revenge, and survival is Beah’s first person account of
serving as a boy soldier during Sierra Leone’s civil war
(1991-2002). It provided a natural progression after this
fall’s study about the African continent, and allowed
students to consider the life of a boy who was forced to
grow up under dramatically different circumstances than
their own.
During the fall term students
studied the African continent
as a whole and then focused
in on western and northern
Africa, learning about the
region’s geography, history, and
important cultural attributes.
This was followed in December
by chapter readings and
daily roundtable discussions
with their teachers, Mr. Peter
Hutchins and Mr. John Cullinan.
The civil war’s effect on Beah and his nation were
profound, and this provoked many lively and thoughtful
discussions among NHS students. They are finishing
this unit by writing an analytical essay on the book and
what they learned from Beah’s journey. The honors class
will make a presentation to the whole school to increase
awareness among other students regarding Sierra Leone’s
national tragedy.
Published February 22, 2008
NHS Music Students
Participate in State Festival
On Saturday, February
16, Andrea Winking ‘08,
Jessica Epstein ‘09, Emily
Jackson ‘10, and Lydia Gill
‘10 participated in the New
Hampshire Music Educators Association (NHMEA) Solo
and Ensemble Festival, held at Plymouth State University.
NHS Music Teacher Kathleen Smith said, “This
annual festival offers students a chance to perform
before a qualified judge and receive feedback and a
grade.” Winking, Epstein, and Jackson gave solo vocal
performances, and Gill a solo violin performance. Smith
noted, “Each student spent weeks preparing their
selection.”
Alexandra Gennaro ’08 is currently preparing for the
upcoming NHMEA All-State Festival. She auditioned
along with 1200 other students from across the state, and
earned a spot in the chorus. This is a three–day event,
and the final concert will take place at the Capitol Center
for the Arts in Concord, NH, on April 5.
Jessica Epstein ‘09 and Andrea
Winking ‘08 smile at the crowd.
Published February 14, 2008
Coral, Crabs, and Chocolate Chip Sea Stars.
Oh My!
A new aquarium, set up amid the science classrooms of Meservey
Hall, is home to some fascinating saltwater animals. The tank is
tended by Mr. Jon Shackett and students under his direction, and has
provided many informal teachable moments over the course of the
year.
Patience is a virtue when trying to grow live coral in a captive
setting,” said Mr. Shackett (obviously a very patient man). The
process began in late September when the physical components
of the tank were set up. These included a high intensity lamp,
a mechanical/chemical/biological canister filtration system, a
chiller/heater
unit set to
keep the
temperature at
a consistent
78 degrees
Fahrenheit,
a protein
skimmer,
whose whirling
venturi action
extracts large
organic
molecules
from the
water column,
and several
high powered
pumps to
simulate the
tidal action of
the natural reef
environment.
Once the physical set up was complete, “live rock” was added. The
rock contains a diverse group of organisms including feather duster
worms and denitrifying bacteria, the latter of which helps stabilize
the reef tank by converting toxic ammonia and nitrites into less
toxic nitrates. Students in Mr. Shackett’s advisory group tested the
levels of these compounds weekly until the ammonia and nitrite
levels reached zero, indicating that the tank had been “cycled” by
the helpful bacteria and that it could safely become home to more
animals.
These included eight red-legged hermit crabs, a small snowflake
moray eel, and two types of soft coral. More recently a chocolate
chip sea star, a sea anemone, and a dwarf lionfish were added. The
reef tank is a living, ever-changing science lesson for students who
pass by on their way to class, and for those who have been involved
in maintaining and testing it.
A close-up of the “live rock.”
Published January 25, 2008
Mundahl Explores “Wikifest” in Asia
Director of Experiential Learning Hans Mundahl has just returned
from “Wikifest,” an Outward Bound International technology
and adventure education conference in Singapore. The seminar
focused on social networking tools and experiential education, and
New Hampton School’s Junior Urban Adventure and the Burleigh
Mountain YouTube channel programs were highlighted as examples
of effective electronic media.
Mundahl reported, “There is some really exciting work going on right
now, and New Hampton School is ahead of the curve in some areas.”
The conference focused on current Internet trends such as “massive
publishing,” free global communications, social networks, and
opportunities for experiential learning. In typical adventure
education fashion, the first day was a ropes course challenge
that brought conference participants together and examined
communication metaphors in an online world. Subsequent
conference sessions focused on topics like building a knowledge base
by using wikis (software that allows users to create, edit, and link
Web pages easily), hiring and marketing using social networks, and
global collaboration using free communication tools.
Mundahl sees short- and long-term benefits to New Hampton School
coming out of the conference. “Our work at NHS is being seen by a
global network of educators who like what they see,” he commented,
“but more tangibly we’ll be able to more effectively manage the
Strategic Plan, hire instructors for the Sophomore Expedition, and
develop curriculum.” He also sees benefits to travel and study
abroad programs that could conceivably be sponsored by New
Hampton School in coming years. “Imagine if our students studying
abroad in India could participate in an Outward Bound course in the
Himalayas before going on to their host families. That would really
help to extend the experience.”
Published January 31, 2008
Math Students Solve “Real World” Problems
What will I ever use this for? Students in Ms. Katerina Farr-
Williams’s Precalculus Honors class know the answer to this
question. They have learned many practical applications for
their studies and now are equipped to evaluate the cost of a
college education, engage in responsible financial planning,
and analyze basic student loans.
Ms. Farr-Williams explained, “Mathematical modeling
is commonly used in biology, economics, and ecology to
demonstrate the applications of functional analysis in the
real world, but our recent student loans project was even
more ambitious. Students were encouraged to apply their
critical thinking and problem-solving skills while calculating
compound interest in a real world problem. This helped
them to understand the true ‘price’ of a loan.”
Students were provided with a list of colleges and their
current tuition costs, and were asked to assume a 6 percent
annual increase. They then had to research the student
loan market to find the best deal, taking into consideration
options beyond posted interest rates, such as deferring
payments and scholarship opportunities. The final grade
was based on a number of factors including a detailed
calculation of tuition over four years and a written summary
or chart that compared various loan options.
The bottom line? Ms. Farr-Williams: “Beyond discovering
the true price of a college education, students learned that it’s
best not to borrow money, but if you have to you should try
to pay it back as quickly as possible!”
Published February 8, 2008
“Winter Dance” To Feature
Diverse Movement Compositions
New Hampton School’s dance program
will grace the McEvoy Theater stage
on Saturday, February 16, 8 pm, and
Sunday, February 17, 2 pm. The public
performances are suitable for all ages
and will feature ballet, jazz, tap, modern,
and hip-hop.
The concert will include works
choreographed by Dance Director Rene
Metzler and senior students, performed
by students in the Dance Technique III
and co-curricular dance classes.
The NHS dance program offers courses for
recreational through serious dancers, as
well as Ballet Training for Athletes.
Metzler has served as NHS dance director
since 2006 and has choreographed NHS
productions of
Soda Pop
and
Little Shop of
Horrors
. She previously taught dance at
the Perkiomen School, Pennsburg, PA; the
French Woods Festival of the Performing
Arts, Hancock, NY; and Muhlenberg
College Dance Center for Children and
Teens; Allentown, PA; among other
settings, and has choreographed over
twenty-five works.
Soo Wan Kim ‘11 and Alex
Kent ’10 play for the crowd.
A dancer strikes a pose.
Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.