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Frost & Sullivan: Care Team Implementation a Critical First Step in Medical Practices' Transition to Accountable Care

7 pages
Frost & Sullivan: Care TeamFrost & Sullivan: Care Team Implementation a Critical First Step in Medical Practices' Transition to Accountable Care PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, Feb. 18, 2014 -- The future of care teams will enhance patient engagement tools As accountable care transforms the U.S. healthcare system, changing culture is becoming a leading challenge for providers. For decades, primary care physicians and specialists have practiced in autonomous, independent silos as a result of prospective payment requirements for reimbursement. However, as doctors begin to augment their practices to manage defined populations, it has become evident that to meet this challenge, providers will need to adapt and reorganize around clinical care teams. The processes, thoughts and requirements for implementing care teams requires in-depth analysis and assessment of the current organizational structure and behavior of an independent practice, including the level of health IT infrastructure in place to support this movement. Frost & Sullivan's new white paper, The Accountable Care Team: A Guide for Care Delivery Transformation (http://www.connectedhealth.frost.com), profiles the innovative approach of Oregon-based Providence Health & Services, a progressive integrated delivery network. The analysis examines the comprehensive process to transform independent physician practices into care teams as a strategy to succeed in an accountable care environment.
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Frost & Sullivan: Care Team Implementation a Critical First Step in Medical Practices' Transition to Accountable Care

PR Newswire

-- The future of care teams will enhance patient engagement tools

As accountable care transforms the U.S. healthcare system, changing culture is becoming a leading challenge for providers. For decades, primary care physicians and specialists have practiced in autonomous, independent silos as a result of prospective payment requirements for reimbursement. However, as doctors begin to augment their practices to manage defined populations, it has become evident that to meet this challenge, providers will need to adapt and reorganize around clinical care teams.