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Frost & Sullivan: Favorable Laws and Programs Ignite the Biomass Gasification and Pyrolysis Market

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Frost & Sullivan: Favorable Laws and Programs Ignite the Biomass Gasification and Pyrolysis Market PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, May 30, 2012 - Volatility in fuel prices makes a strong case for alternate fuel sources MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, May 30, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The nascent application of gasification and pyrolysis as power-producing technologies is soon expected to give way to a lively adoption rate of these technologies in North America. The governments are offering funding and support for renewable energy to assuage escalating environmental concerns. Analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.energy.frost.com) North American Biomass Gasification and Pyrolysis Market finds that the market earned revenues of $4.17 billion in 2010 and estimates this to reach $7.34 billion in 2017. If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an email to Britni Myers, Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com, with your full name, company name, title, telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and country. Already in the U.S., several states have implemented Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which mandates that a certain percent of electricity be generated from renewable energy sources to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. On the back of these and other varied government incentives, the first commercial-scale biomass gasification project will begin operating in the next two years.
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Frost & Sullivan: Favorable Laws and
Programs Ignite the Biomass Gasification and
Pyrolysis Market
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, May 30, 2012
- Volatility in fuel prices makes a strong case for alternate fuel
sources
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
May 30, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- The nascent
application of gasification and pyrolysis as power-producing technologies is
soon expected to give way to a lively adoption rate of these technologies in
North America
. The governments are offering funding and support for
renewable energy to assuage escalating environmental concerns.
Analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.energy.frost.com)
North American
Biomass Gasification and Pyrolysis Market
finds that the market earned
revenues of
$4.17 billion
in 2010 and estimates this to reach
$7.34 billion
in
2017.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Britni Myers, Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com,
with your full name, company name, title, telephone number, company email
address, company website, city, state and country.
Already in the U.S., several states have implemented Renewable Portfolio
Standards (RPS), which mandates that a certain percent of electricity be
generated from renewable energy sources to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions. On the back of these and other varied government incentives, the
first commercial-scale biomass gasification project will begin operating in the
next two years.
Alternate fuels' rising profile mirrors the growth in demand for electricity, which
is expected to increase by 30.0 percent in the next 20 years. Another
argument in favor of alternate fuel sources, such as biomass gasification and
pyrolysis, is the unpredictability of fuel prices, which affects the world's leading
economies.
The United States
is highly dependent on foreign oil. The country produces only
6.0 percent of the world's annual petroleum supply, but consumes about 25.0
percent. This has created an urgent need to ensure national energy security
and greater self sufficiency.
"Syngas or pyrolysis oil for power generation costs more than conventional
fuels," said a Frost & Sullivan research analyst. "However, as natural gas prices
are volatile and biomass feedstock is inexpensive, syngas and pyrolysis oil are
promising alternatives."
Price volatility can be a double-edged sword, as biomass producers have
discovered. Fluctuations in transportation costs of raw materials have made
proximity to feedstock an important consideration when choosing a power
plant's location. Decentralizing biomass power plants is an economical method
to provide power to remote locations, where access to transmission lines is
usually expensive. Pyrolysis' main advantage is that it produces transportable