The effects of background music on long-term memory
1 page
English
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

The effects of background music on long-term memory

-

Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
1 page
English

Description

The effects of background music on long-term memory

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de lectures 105
Langue English

Exrait

The effects of background music on long-term memo Sherilene Carr, Nikki Rickard; Monash University, Australia  sherilene.carr@med.monash.edu.au  The facilitatory effect of moderate emotional arousal on memory is robust and has been attributed to the noradrenergic neuromodulatory system (Cahill et al., 1994). However, it is questionable whether this means of memory enhancement can be utilized therapeutically as the source of emotional arousal (such as images of human trauma accompanied by tragic stories) has typically been intrinsic to the material to be remembered. The use of emotioninducing music as an extraneous source of arousal within this paradigm is as yet untested. Music offers more promise than other sources of extraneous arousal (such as exercise or glucose) as it has the potential to infuse affect into otherwise neutral material, as occurs with film soundtracks. In the current study, negatively valent music (Holsts Mars, the Bringer of War from The Planets) was played in the background to 9 participants as they watched a slideshow containing IAPS images and a neutral narrative. One week later, a surprise recognition memory test for the images was conducted and memory was compared to two additional groups (9 participants in each) who viewed the same slideshow, with either neutral (Saties Gymnopedies No 1, orchestral) or no background music. Planned comparisons between the music conditions and the nomusic control revealed recall of the slideshow images was better for participants who heard neutral background music. The failure to detect any changes in physiological or self report measures of arousal indicated the negative music did not have the intended arousing effect. The enhancing effect of neutral music on longterm memory was not predicted; however it is possible that enjoyment mediated this effect (Schellenberg and colleagues), as the neutral music was enjoyed significantly more than the negative music. One of the limitations of this experiment was low experimental power. Nevertheless, future research aims to pursue the music induced enjoyment hypothesis on longterm memory performance.  
r