Reasonable elocution. A text-book for schools, colleges, clergymen, lawyers, actors, etc

Reasonable elocution. A text-book for schools, colleges, clergymen, lawyers, actors, etc

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X ELOCUTIONREASONABLE TEXT-BOOK FOB SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, CLERGYMEN, LAWYERS, ETC.ACTORS, BY MRS. P. TAVERNER GRAHAM. A. S. BARNES AND COMPANY, NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. Entered to Act of in theaccording Congress, year 1874, by A. S. BARNES & CO., In atthe Office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington. C \\ INTRODUCTION. isthe Art of will "comeReading naturally" THAT con-a common with which we almostfallacy, ifdelude ourselves. Even it were it wouldtrue,stantly offer little to those who theencouragement appreciate and of the art for some method of;importancebeauty isis and as thisreading always taught, extremely likely ato be all chance ofradically wrong, attaining strictly natural of is at anstyle reading destroyed early period of the career errors of instruction and the con-pupil's by of badtagion example. ofIn Elocution is both a sciencefact, however,point art onand an founded in thelaws,resting positive of in the case ofnature as other art or; and,things any these laws never come but must bescience, by nature, and Themastered master must haveby study practice. hours and in careful research and delin-spent days patient eation of the most natural he must;insignificant points have familiarized himself with all science that bears even on his otherwise he himself to theart;remotely exposes of into his anddanger introducing work,incongruities of which will be at oncecommitting blunders, apparent to the trained observer.

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XELOCUTIONREASONABLE
TEXT-BOOK
FOB
SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, CLERGYMEN, LAWYERS,
ETC.ACTORS,
BY
MRS. P. TAVERNER GRAHAM.
A. S. BARNES AND COMPANY,
NEW YORK AND CHICAGO.Entered to Act of in theaccording Congress, year 1874, by
A. S. BARNES & CO.,
In atthe Office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington.
C \\INTRODUCTION.
isthe Art of will "comeReading naturally"
THAT con-a common with which we almostfallacy,
ifdelude ourselves. Even it were it wouldtrue,stantly
offer little to those who theencouragement appreciate
and of the art for some method of;importancebeauty
isis and as thisreading always taught, extremely likely
ato be all chance ofradically wrong, attaining strictly
natural of is at anstyle reading destroyed early period
of the career errors of instruction and the con-pupil's by
of badtagion example.
ofIn Elocution is both a sciencefact, however,point
art onand an founded in thelaws,resting positive
of in the case ofnature as other art or; and,things any
these laws never come but must bescience, by nature,
and Themastered master must haveby study practice.
hours and in careful research and delin-spent days patient
eation of the most natural he must;insignificant points
have familiarized himself with all science that bears even
on his otherwise he himself to theart;remotely exposes
of into his anddanger introducing work,incongruities
of which will be at oncecommitting blunders, apparent
to the trained observer. for areSculptors, instance,
to in order to avoid the mistakesobliged study anatomy,
would were of the distri-they perpetrate they ignorant4 INTRODUCTION.
of the bones and their movements andbution muscles,
attachments in the human frame. But even this is not
if the be unfamiliar with the ofenough ; sculptor theory
" he his workequilibrium," may spoil by representing
fromthe the centre of asperpendicular gravity falling
And the for scientificunnaturally. necessity knowledge
in the is moreeven evident it is the of;painter disregard
and the lack of all aerial that consti-linear, perspective,
tutes the of Chinese
;absurdity pictures yet perspective
rests on natural laws which science alone canstrictly
interpret.
The artistic effects an anproduced elocutionist,by
or an and sub-orator, actor, represent purely objective
and can be truejective phenomena ; they representations
in so far as conform to the natural laws ofonly they
these Before can thus thephenomena. they conform,
anddelineator of human must under-feelings passions
stand what are the laws and under what conditionsHhey
of is ofFor this thereason,vary. study psychology
it will enablethe utmost to the elocutionist ;importance
his inflections of intonationhim to indicate voice, byby
his mental attitude toward certainand by emphasis,
and sentiments without to itdigression explain ;thoughts
and this is the whole art of Elocution.
nearly
and at leastorator, actor, possessesEvery clergyman,
a stock of which him inempirical guidegeneralizations
his of the matter in hand but to have aexposition ; gen-
eral idea of what we are to do and of howwe are toonly
ourselves under is not suf-express given circumstances,
ficient such will not enable us to
; meagre knowledge
of or various and com-delineate different shades thought
ofemotions. It is this sort orplex vague impression
definite that us thatrather, quite ignorance gives large