Catalogue of the Hebrew books in the library of the British museum. Printed by order of the Trustees
908 pages
English

Catalogue of the Hebrew books in the library of the British museum. Printed by order of the Trustees

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908 pages
English
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Tout savoir sur nos offres

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;CATALOGUEHEBREW BOOKSLIBRARYTHE BRITISH MUSEUM.BYTRINTED ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.SOLD AT THE BRITISH MUSEUMAND BYCO., PATERNOSTER ROW; B. M. PICKERING, 196, PICCADILLYLONGMAN &A. ASHER & CO., 20, UNTER DEN LINDEN, BERLIN.AND1867.:zV7<6LONDONr-.ivren nv ratramm, lea and oo.,''""- 'ice, nam n ciPREFACE.in the followingThe collection of Hebrew books, described catalogue,upwards of bound volumes, and comprises worksconsists of 10,100learning.in all branches of Hebrew and Rabbinical It has grownfrom small beginnings. In 1759, when theMuseum was first openedEditio Princeps of the Talmud was the only Hebrewto the public, the_in the librarywork it contained, and this was included ro) al presentedto the Museum by King George II. In the same year Mr. SolomonDa Costa, a Jewish merchant, who had immigrated from Holland, pre-180 volumes, containingsented a collection of the most valuable worksofRabbinical literature. During the succeeding 89 years, the Hebrewbooks had increased to about 600. In however,1848, 4,420 volumeswere purchased from the famous collection of Mr. H. J. Michael, ofHamburg. This acquisition at once raised the Museum collection ofHebrew books to be one of importance, and gave an impetus to thisbranch of the library, which has been constantly maintained to thepresent time, and has resulted in making the national collection ofHebrew books the largest in the world. While this catalogue waspassing through the press, Messrs. ...

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; CATALOGUE HEBREW BOOKS LIBRARY THE BRITISH MUSEUM. BYTRINTED ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES. SOLD AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM AND BY CO., PATERNOSTER ROW; B. M. PICKERING, 196, PICCADILLYLONGMAN & A. ASHER & CO., 20, UNTER DEN LINDEN, BERLIN.AND 1867. : z V7 <6 LONDON r-.ivren nv ratramm, lea and oo., ''""- ' ice, nam n ci PREFACE. in the followingThe collection of Hebrew books, described catalogue, upwards of bound volumes, and comprises worksconsists of 10,100 learning.in all branches of Hebrew and Rabbinical It has grown from small beginnings. In 1759, when theMuseum was first opened Editio Princeps of the Talmud was the only Hebrewto the public, the _ in the librarywork it contained, and this was included ro) al presented to the Museum by King George II. In the same year Mr. Solomon Da Costa, a Jewish merchant, who had immigrated from Holland, pre- 180 volumes, containingsented a collection of the most valuable works ofRabbinical literature. During the succeeding 89 years, the Hebrew books had increased to about 600. In however,1848, 4,420 volumes were purchased from the famous collection of Mr. H. J. Michael, of Hamburg. This acquisition at once raised the Museum collection of Hebrew books to be one of importance, and gave an impetus to this branch of the library, which has been constantly maintained to the present time, and has resulted in making the national collection of Hebrew books the largest in the world. While this catalogue was passing through the press, Messrs. Ashcr, of Berlin, purchased the Hebrew library of the late Joseph Almanzi, Padua,of from which the Trustees of the British Museum were enabled to select such works as were not in the Museum library. It has been considered advisable that all acquisitions made during the printing of the catalogue should appear in it. These have been included in the few leaves of Addenda. — IV TREFACE. Iii theaddition to Hebrew books this catalogue comprises postbiblical1. Translations of Hebrew works. 2. Works in the Arabic, Spanish, German, and other languages, printed with Hebrew characters. 3. Bibliographical works with special reference to postbiblical literature, as those ofDe Rossi, Zunz, Steinschneider, etc.; catalogues ofalso Hebrew works and biographies of the authors of Hebrew works. In order to give a general idea of the nature and importance of this collection, it may be sufficient to specify the following classes, viz. Bibles 1260 vols.1. 2. Commentaries on the Bible .... 510 „ 3. Talmud 730 „ 4. on the Talmud 700 „ 5. Codes of Law 12G0 „ 6. Decisions 520 „ 7. Midrash 160 „ 4608. Cabala „ 9. Sermons 400 „ 10. Liturgies 1200 „ 11. Divine Philosophy 690 „ 12. Scientific works ISO „ 13. Grammars, Dictionaries 450 „ 14. History, Geography 320 „ 15. Poetry, Criticism 770 „ early printed works,Of books and other rare there arc Books1. of the 15th century, mentioned by De Rossi . . 65 works. 2. Books printed from to mentioned by Be Rossi 2371500 1540, „ 3. Books from 14tsO to 1540, Dot mentioned by De Rossi 32 „ 4. Books of which no other copy, or only 1 or 2 other copies are known to exist 38 „ one of the seniorThe catalogue has been compiled by Mr. Zedner, t ant in thes library of the British Museum, whose great and <>l' mid lidaccurate knowledge Hebrew Rabbinical ratine has proved the only in theof greatest service, not preparation of this work, but -in tin- 1the acquisition of ks themselvi PREFACE. V —All titles are arranged in alphabetical order.Arrangement. Jewish authorsI. BooksWITH Authors' Names.— of Hebrew works before 1700 are catalogued under their name, unless they havefirst the family name when writing in other languages. Themade use of same ride is followed with those ol modern times who have no family name. Authors bearing the same name, e. Abraham, Jacob, are insertedg. —in the following order: 1. Those distinguished by an epithet only, derived from their alphabeti-birthplace, rank, or occupation, arranged after the cal order of the epithets. 2. Those followed by the word ben (son of), and the name of the father,* arranged according to the name of the father. 3. Compound names, of first and family names, as Jacob Berab, or two first names, as Jacob Zeeb. 4. Family names, as Jacob (Henry). The separate works of each author in alphabetical order ; the chronological order.editions of each work in —II. General Headings. Bible, arranged according to the order of books in the Hebrew bibles ; the editions of the whole Bible, as well parts, in chronologicalas of single books, or order. Of the great Polyglot editions, fully described in the general catalogue of the British Museum, only short titles are given. Misknah, Talmud, Thoseftha. The editions of the whole work are followed by its subdivisions in their regular order. Liturgies. The first three subdivisions contain prayers, without reference to any partictdar rite, as Hagadah, Occasional Prayers, Readings followed; by those arranged after the names of places, or the names of rites, in alphabetical order, as Alessandria—Yarmouth ; and again subdivided according to the class of prayer, as Daily Prayers, Fastday Prayers, Festival Prayers, etc. Periodical Publications. These are arranged in alphabetical order of the country and the town where they have been published. —III. Anonymous Works. Anonymous works are arranged under the name of the author, known,whenever and will also be found * The father's name is omitted, -phen the author sufficientlyis distinguished by his family name, as Jacob Aben Chabib. — ratavi index of titles. Where the author is not known, or thein the authorship uncertain, the heading is taken from any proper name < 7-irring in the title; , if no auch name appear, from the first substantive. reputed author appears, book isWhere the name of a the catal under that name. The same is done with regard to pseudonymous works. refutations and critiques are catalogued under theAnonymous work refutedauthor of the or commented upon. Coi.i.ii noNS.—Collections of worksofseveral authors are catalogued tinder the name of the editor; if without an editor, under the name one individual, theof the firsl author; if relating to under name of that individual. —References. General cross-references are givenCross the family name of authors, according to the1. From arranged first names, to such first names, e. g. Schick (Isaac ben David), see I> \ \< also from the first name to the family name, where the author ; -has in T 1 1 • of his family name, as Abrahum ! nbeen habit omitting Eliczer, Wilna, see Lit ni^ii in ; or where the orthography of itof is uncertain, as Elijah ben Joseph Shamma, see Shamma. forms of names as they may appear, or ii"t, in2. From correctly this asother printed books, to the one adopted in catalogue, Kulli (Jacob), see Ci 11. s, ' d from the ofnames editot trans- of .MS. notes in tlio ho. klators, « titers catalogued, as alsofrom authors works appear in a collection, nol being a periodical. t'ross-whose \i" Periodica] Publications are lt i 1 1 only in cases ofreferencee the authors of ancient lor the time, ofMSS. published first and biogra- ''phies of 1 brated mi n. 1 following alter the works of each author, are to the alphabetical order of thearranged according headings referred 1. etc., which followto, except those relatingto Bible, Talmu theordi r arrangement of thoseh 1 mentioned above. theof Where the date and size of the honk is chronological, onlj i.d to an- thegiven. Biographical cross-references precede worl nanusi:\niv.— Biblical are rendered according to the in tie authorized English version, asform used Aaron, Judah,
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