contemporary art, film, music, literature and fashion from the ...

contemporary art, film, music, literature and fashion from the ...

-

Documents
400 pages
Lire
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

  • mémoire
  • cours - matière : music
  • cours - matière potentielle : saturdays
  • exposé
  • cours - matière potentielle : award
  • expression écrite
contemporary art, film, music, literature and fashion from the middle east and north africa leighton house museum // october – november 2011
  • partnership
  • house museum
  • leighton house
  • contemporary developments
  • oday rasheed rasheed
  • bahij hojeij hojeij
  • collection for inspiration
  • inspiration from an eastern souk
  • art
  • arab world

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de visites sur la page 37
Langue English
Signaler un problème

ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION









Christopher Allen Green










The Graduate School

University of Kentucky

2004
THE SOCIAL LIFE OF POETRY: PLURALISM AND APPALACHIA, 1937-1946








ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION



A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the
College of Arts and Sciences
at the University of Kentucky


By
Christopher Allen Green

Lexington, Kentucky

Director: Dr. Dale Bauer, Professor of English

Lexington, Kentucky

2004

Copyright © Chris Green 2004
ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION



THE SOCIAL LIFE OF POETRY: PLURALISM AND APPALACHIA, 1937-1946

This dissertation demonstrates how poetry about Appalachia expanded American considerations of
democracy, ethnicity, and cultural values. I argue that poetry is profoundly communal in its construction
and investigate how the value of poetry changes based upon its transfer through varying networks of
production, circulation, and reception. Informed by theories of cultural capital and rhetoric, the chapters
trace three books of poetry from their composition and publication to their reception and influence, noting
how central political and social institutions and individuals shaped that process. The dissertation establishes
how the poets crafted their writing to sway specific interpretive communities’ attitudes on pluralism. In
Hounds on the Mountain (Viking, 1937), James Still sang about the erosion of the quiet earth for the liberal,
middleclass readers of The Atlantic. In U. S. 1 (Covici·Friede, 1938), Muriel Rukeyser wrote about the
deaths of migrant and African-American miners, the Spanish Civil War, and the threat of fascism for
popular-front readers of The New Republic, Poetry, and the New Masses. In Clods of Southern Earth
(Boni and Gaer, 1946), Don West catalyzed resistance in an interracial readership of southern (and
mountain) sharecroppers and factory workers. In each case, the complex interrelations between history,
authors, and readers show their mutually transformative effects on pluralism. Within American pluralism
from1900 to 1948, my work reveals the vital relations between established ethnicities—African-
American, Jewish, Anglo, American Indian, and Southern—and Appalachia. My account follows
the concrete connections of pluralism from Plessy vs. Ferguson’s judicial theory of racial purity, through a
cultural pluralism based on national origins during WWI, to the Harlem Renaissance, and ends with an
examination of regional pluralism in the 1930s. Appalachia was then often understood as preserving
remnants of a premodern America, and the authors about whom I write used it to authenticate the values of
community, which they felt to be endangered by the threats of modern dissociation, industrial exploitation,
and fascist culture. Through close readings of poems in the three books, I establish Appalachia’s role in the
discourse of modern American pluralism—the poetics of region and race.

KEYWORDS: American Poetry, Cultural Studies, Reader-response Criticism,
Multiculturalism, Appalachian Region

























Christopher A. Green

April 20, 2004
THE SOCIAL LIFE OF POETRY: PLURALISM AND APPALACHIA, 1937-1946




By

Christopher Allen Green













Dale M. Bauer
Director of Dissertation


Dale M. Bauer
Director of Graduate Studies


April 20, 2004
RULES FOR USE OF DISSERTATIONS

Unpublished dissertations submitted for the Doctor’s degree and deposited in the University of
Kentucky Library are as a rule open for inspection, but are to be used only with due regard to the
rights of the authors. Bibliographical references may be noted, but quotations or summaries of
part may be published only with the permission of the author, and with the usual scholarly
acknowledgments.

Extensive copying for publication of the dissertation in whole or in part also requires the consent
of the Dean of the Graduate School of the University of Kentucky.

DISSERTATION









Christopher Allen Green










The Graduate School

University of Kentucky

2004

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF POETRY: PLURALISM AND APPALACHIA, 1937-1946








DISSERTATION



A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the
College of Arts and Sciences
at the University of Kentucky


By
Christopher Allen Green

Lexington, Kentucky

Director: Dr. Dale Bauer, Professor of English

Lexington, Kentucky

2004

Copyright © Chris Green 2004




For Jenny









ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I extend deep appreciation to Dale Bauer because of her belief, wherewithal, and
commitment. I also give gratitude to the quiet direction of Dwight Billings, whom can best be
labeled a sage. And thanks to Janet Eldred for standing by me from word go, and thanks to
Gordon Hutner for coming on board at the finale. And thanks as well to the Department of
English and the University Graduate School, each of which funded my research and
presentations around the country. On those travels, I was able to meet remarkable people and
utilize essential archives. I bow to my fellow radical scholars: Rachel Rubin, Professor of
American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston; Jim Lorence, Eminent Scholar of
History, Gainesville College, GA; and James Smethurst, Professor of African-American Studies,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst. I also bow to Clara Keyes, Special Collections Librarian,
at Morehead State University; I bow to Pam Hackbart-Dean, Director, Southern Labor Archives,
at the Pullen Library, Georgia State University; I bow to Ann Salter, Head Librarian at
Oglethorpe University, which opened up new collections for me; I bow to Sara Wilson and
LaLoria Konata who manned Special Collections at Atlanta University; I bow to Claire McGann,
Manuscripts Librarian, at the University of Kentucky’s Special Collections & Archives; and I
bow to Dave, Janitor for the Third Floor of the Young Library who granted me sanity. I also
give my sincere appreciation to the Interlibrary Loan Librarians and Timothy Garrison,
Borrowing Technician, at the University of Kentucky, who so quickly and ably brought in my
varied, myriad requests.
I send out unrelenting adorations to Kimmerle Green, my sister, who explored the
Highlander Research and Education Center papers at the Wisconsin Historical Society in
Madison; I adulate Craig Hobson, my brother-in-law, who took time from his own masters
degree to scrounge into the depths of Claude Williams’ Papers at Wayne State University,
Detroit. And I thank my parents—all six of them—whose support and love has kept me sane and
my family healthy; throughout my lifetime, they have modeled for me what it means to give.
My work also takes its place in a line of scholars whose work has inspired my own: Cary
Nelson’s Repression and Recovery: Modern American Poetry and the Politics of Cultural
Memory, 1910-1945 (1989); Adrienne Rich’s What is Found There: Note Books on Poetry and
Politics (1993); Slavoj Žižek’s The Sublime Object of Ideology (1989); Henry D Shapiro’s
Appalachia on Our Mind: The Southern Mountains and Mountaineers in theAmerican
iv