Credit Course Descriptions

Credit Course Descriptions

Documents
430 pages
Lire
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

  • cours magistral - matière potentielle : portion
  • exposé - matière potentielle : elements
  • cours - matière potentielle : content
  • cours - matière potentielle : by the execution of actual drawing types
  • exposé
  • cours - matière potentielle : descriptions key
  • expression écrite
  • cours - matière potentielle : fulfills
Credit Course Descriptions Key to course/department prefixes: ACC* Accounting ANT* Anthropology ARC* Architecture ART* Art ASL* American Sign Language AST* Astronomy BBG* Business-General BES* Business-Entrepreneurship BFN* Business-Finance BIO* Biological Sciences BMG* Business-Management BMK* Business-Marketing CAD* Computer-Aided Drafting CHE* Chemistry CHI* Chinese CIV* Civil Engineering Technology CJS* Criminal Justice COM* Communication/Speech COU Counseling CSA* Computer Applications CSC* Computer Science CST* Computer Technology CTC* Construction Technology DNT* Dental Hygiene
  • principles of architectural design
  • studies from cultural anthropology
  • analysis of site conditions
  • scaled detail building project
  • electrical engineering technology egr
  • hypothetical project from preliminary zoning research
  • forensic accounting
  • construction
  • design
  • students

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de visites sur la page 15
Langue English
Signaler un problème

Geometr y Assessments
The Charles A. Dana Center
at The University of Texas at Austin
With funding from
the Texas Education Agency and
the National Science Foundation
48810 Frontmatter 59 8/21/02, 11:19 AM48810 Frontmatter 1 8/21/02, 11:19 AMAbout the Charles A. Dana Center’s Work
in Mathematics and Science
The Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin works to
support education leaders and policymakers in strengthening Texas edu-
cation. As a research unit of UT Austin’s College of Natural Sciences, the
Dana Center maintains a special emphasis on mathematics and science
education. We offer professional development institutes and produce
research-based mathematics and science resources for educators to use
in helping all students achieve academic success. For more information,
visit the Dana Center website at www.utdanacenter.org.
The development of this work is supported in part by the Texas Education
Agency, the National Science Foundation under cooperative agreement
#ESR-9712001, and the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of
Texas at Austin. Any opinions, fndings, conclusions, or recommendations
expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessar-
ily refect the views of the Texas Education Agency, the National Science
Foundation, or The University of Texas at Austin.
Permission is given to any person, group, or organization to copy and
distribute this publication, Geometry Assessments, for noncommercial
educational purposes only, so long as the appropriate credit is given. This
permission is granted by the Charles A. Dana Center, a unit of the College
of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin.
First printing August 2002
©2002, The University of Texas at Austin. All rights reserved.
ISBN 0-9707948-8-6
H
ii
48810 Frontmatter 2 8/21/02, 11:19 AMAuthors
Basia Hall, Houston ISD
David Eschberger, Region IV Education Service Center
Diane Reed, Ysleta ISD
Ken Rutkowski, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School, Austin
Charles A. Dana Center Production Team
Diane McGowan, Editor
HeeJoon Kim, Assistant Editor
Kathy Park, Proofreader
Brandy Windham, Proofreader
Phil Swann, Senior Designer
Rob Eagleton, Graphics Assistant
Aaron Rutkowski, Geometer Sketchpad Gr
H
iii
48810 Frontmatter 3 8/21/02, 11:19 AMGeometry Assessments Advisory Team
Heidi Anderson, International School of the Americas, Northeast ISD, San Antonio
Brian Barns, Sweetwater High School, Sweetwater ISD
Sue Borders, Texas Education Agency, Assessment Division
Kathi Cook, Charles A. Dana Center
James Epperson, University of Texas at Arlington
David Eschberger, Region IV Education Service Center
Paula Gustafson, T, Curriculum and Professional Development
Julie Guthrie, Texas Education Agency, Assessment Division
Kathy Hale, Region XIV Education Service Center
Basia Hall, Houston ISD
Mary Alice Hatchett, Round Rock ISD
Arthur Howard, Aldine ISD
Susan Hudson Hull, Charles A. Dana Center
Denise Kraft, New Braunfels ISD
Garland Linkenhoger, McAllen ISD
Kelli Mallory, Region X Education Service Center
Diane McGowan, Charles A. Dana Center
Barbara Montalto, Texas Education Agency, Curriculum and Professional Development
Joseph Montana, San Antonio USI
Pat Miller, Fort Worth ISD
Marlene Nelson, Region VII Education Service Center
Erika Pierce, Charles A. Dana Center
Domingo Ponce, Grand Prairie ISD
Diane Reed, Ysleta ISD
Barbara Rives, Lamar State College, Orange
Elsa Ruiz, Laredo ISD
Ken Rutkowski, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School, Austin
Carol Salzwedel, Lee High School, Northeast ISD
Judy Shahan, Eagle Mt-Saginaw ISD
Ann Shannon, University of California, Offce of the President
Dick Stanley, University of California at Berkeley
Walter Stewart, Aldine ISD
Susan Thomas, Alamo Heights ISD
Judy Wright, Lanier High School, San Antonio ISD
With Special Thanks to:
Ted Beal, Birdville ISD; Jason Deutsch, Birdville ISD; Donna Harris, Region XI Education
Service Center; Pamm Hoffman, Arlington ISD; Cindy McColly, Grand Prairie ISD;
Brenda Mesa, Fort Worth ISD; Betsy Norris, Fort Worth ISD; Rebecca Russell,
Fort Worth ISD; Joyce Schneider, Carroll ISD; Faith Schwope, Grand Prairie ISD;
Caesar J. Thibodaux, III, Pasadena ISD; Melissa Williams, Birdville ISD; Belinda Windham,
Birdville ISD
H
iv
48810 Frontmatter 4 8/21/02, 11:19 AMH
v
48810 Frontmatter 5 8/21/02, 11:20 AMTEKS and TAKS Resources
The mathematics Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) were
developed by the state of Texas to clarify what all students should
know and be able to do in mathematics in kindergarten through grade
12. Districts are required to provide instruction that is aligned with the
mathematics TEKS, which were adopted by the State Board of Education
in 1997 and implemented statewide in 1998. The mathematics TEKS also
form the objectives and student expectations for the mathematics portion
of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS), which will be
implemented in spring 2003 for grades 3 through 10 and for the Grade
11 Exit Level assessment.
The mathematics TEKS can be downloaded in printable format, free of
charge, from the Texas Education Agency website (www.tea.state.tx.us/
teks). Bound versions of the mathematics and science TEKS are available
for a fee from the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at
Austin (www.utdanacenter.org).
Resources for implementing the mathematics TEKS, including
professional development opportunities, are available through the Texas
Education Agency and the Charles A. Dana Center, the state-designated
Mathematics Center for Educator Development. Online resources can be
found in the Mathematics TEKS Toolkit at www.mathtekstoolkit.org.
Additional products and services that may be of interest are available from
the Dana Center at www.utdanacenter.org. These include the following:
• TEKS, TAAS, and TAKS: What’s Tested at Grades 3–8 charts
• Mathematics Abridged TEKS charts
• Mathematics TEKS “Big Picture” posters
• Mathematics Standards in the Classroom: Resources for Grades 3–5
• ces for Grades 6–8
• Algebra I Assessments and the corresponding professional
development
• TEXTEAMS professional development mathematics institutes
• TEKS for Leaders professional development modules for principals
and other administrators
H
v iC ONTENT S
H
vii
48810 Frontmatter 7 8/21/02, 11:20 AMC ONTENT S
Introduction x
Solution Guide xiii
Mathematics TEKS Alignment xiv
Mathematics Grade 11 Exit Level TAKS Alignment xix
Chapter 1: Coordinate Geometry 1
Cross Country Cable 5
Whitebeard’s Treasure 13
Quadrilateral Quandary 23
Quite a Quilt 31
Wearable Art 47
Sea Quest 53
Chapter 2: Patterns, Conjecture, and Proof 59
Pizza Delivery Service Regions 63
More Pizza Delivery 77
Conjecture as Discovery and Proof as Explanation 87
Extending the Triangle Midsegment Conjecture 101
Why Doesn’t My Conjecture Work? 109
Steiner’s Point 117s Point Revisited 129
Walking the Archimedean Walk 137
TTalk 149
Mad as a Hatter or Hat as a Madder 157
Going the Distance in Taxicab Land 167
Chapter 3: Properties and Relationships 187
of Geometric Figures
Angle Bisectors and Parallel Lines 191
Circles and Tangents 199
The Clubhouse 205
Diagonals and Polygons 211
The Most Juice 219
viii
48810 Frontmatter 8 8/21/02, 11:20 AM