Quasi isometry rigidity of groups

Quasi isometry rigidity of groups

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Quasi-isometry rigidity of groups Cornelia DRUT¸U Universite de Lille I, Contents 1 Preliminaries on quasi-isometries 2 1.1 Basic definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 Examples of quasi-isometries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Rigidity of non-uniform rank one lattices 6 2.1 Theorems of Richard Schwartz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.2 Finite volume real hyperbolic manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.3 Proof of Theorem 2.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.4 Proof of Theorem 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • now all

  • group

  • any word

  • symmetric space

  • simplicial trees

  • regular simplicial

  • compact riemannian

  • relatively hyperbolic


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Ajouté le 18 juin 2012
Nombre de lectures 14
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Quasi-isometry rigidity of groups
Cornelia DRUT¸U
Universit´e de Lille I,
Cornelia.Drutu@math.univ-lille1.fr
Contents
1 Preliminaries on quasi-isometries 2
1.1 Basic definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Examples of quasi-isometries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2 Rigidity of non-uniform rank one lattices 6
2.1 Theorems of Richard Schwartz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.2 Finite volume real hyperbolic manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.3 Proof of Theorem 2.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.4 Proof of Theorem 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3 Classes of groups complete with respect to quasi-isometries 14
3.1 List of classes of groups q.i. complete. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.2 Relatively hyperbolic groups: preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4 Asymptotic cones of a metric space 18
4.1 Definition, preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.2 A sample of what one can do using asymptotic cones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.3 Examples of asymptotic cones of groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
5 Relatively hyperbolic groups: image from infinitely far away and rigidity 23
5.1 Tree-graded spaces and cut-points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5.2 The characterization of relatively hyperbolic groups in terms of asymptotic cones 25
5.3 Rigidity of relatively hyperbolic groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
5.4 More rigidity of relatively hyperbolic groups: outer automorphisms . . . . . . . . 29
6 Groups asymptotically with(out) cut-points 30
6.1 Groups with elements of infinite order in the center, not virtually cyclic . . . . . 31
6.2 Groups satisfying an identity, not virtually cyclic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6.3 Existence of cut-points in asymptotic cones and relative hyperbolicity . . . . . . 33
7 Open questions 34
8 Dictionary 35
1These notes represent a slightly modified version of the lectures given at the summer school
“G´eom´etries a` courbure n´egative ou nulle, groupes discrets et rigidite´s” held from the 14-th of
June till the 2-nd of July 2004 in Grenoble.
Many of the open questions formulated in the paper do not belong to the author and have
been asked by other people before.
1 Preliminaries on quasi-isometries
Nota bene: In order to ensure some coherence in the exposition, some notions are not defined
in the text, but in a Dictionary at the end of the text.
1.1 Basic definitions
A quasi-isometric embedding of a metric space (X,dist ) into a metric space (Y,dist ) is a mapX Y
q :X!Y such that for every x ,x "X,1 2
1
dist (x ,x )#C$ dist (q(x ),q(x ))$Ldist (x ,x)+C, (1)X 1 2 Y 1 2 X 1 2L
for some constants L% 1 and C% 0.
IfX is a finite interval [a,b] then q is called quasi-geodesic (segment). If a =#& or b=+&
then q is called quasi-geodesic ray. If both a =#& and b=+& then q is called quasi-geodesic
line. The same names are used for the image of q.
If moreover Y is contained in theC–tubular neighbourhood of q(X) then q is called a quasi-
¯ ¯ ¯isometry. In this case there exists q : Y ! X quasi-isometry such that q' q and q' q are at
uniformly bounded distance from the respective identity maps (see [GH ] for a proof). We call2
¯q quasi-converse of q.
The objects of study are the finitely generated groups. We first recall how to make them
into geometric objects. Given a group G with a finite set of generators S containing together
with every element its inverse, one can construct the Cayley graph Cayley(G,S) as follows:
• its set of vertices is G;
• every pair of elements g ,g "G such thatg =g s, with s"S, is joined by an edge. The1 2 1 2
oriented edge (g ,g ) is labeled by s.1 2
We supposethat every edge has length 1and we endow Cayley(G,S) with thelength metric.
Its restriction to G is called the word metric associated to S and it is denoted by dist . SeeS
Figure 1 for the Cayley graph of the free group of rank twoF =(a,b).2
Remark 1.1. A Cayley graph can be constructed also for an infinite set of generators. In this
case the graph has infinite valence in each point.
¯We note that if S and S are two finite generating sets of G then dist and dist are bi-¯S S
2Lipschitz equivalent. In Figure 2 are represented the Cayley graph ofZ with set of generators
2{(1,0),(0,1)} and the Cayley graph ofZ with set of generators {(1,0),(1,1)}.
2b
!1
a a
!1
b
Figure 1: Cayley graph ofF .2
2Figure 2: Cayley graph ofZ .
31.2 Examples of quasi-isometries
1. The main example, which partly justifies the interest in quasi-isometries, is the following.
!Given M a compact Riemannian manifold, let M be its universal covering and let ! (M)1
be its fundamental group. The group ! (M) is finitely generated, in fact even finitely1
presented [BrH, Corollary I.8.11, p.137].
!The metric space M with the Riemannian metric is quasi-isometric to ! (M) with some1
word metric. This can be clearly seen in the case when M is the n-dimensional flat torus
n n n n!T . In this caseM isR and ! (M) isZ . They are quasi-isometric, asR is a thickening1
nofZ .
2. More generally, if a group! acts properly discontinuously and with compact quotient by
isometries on a complete locally compact length metric space (X,dist ) then ! is finitely!
generated [BrH, Theorem I.8.10, p. 135] and ! endowed with any word metric is quasi-
isometric to (X,dist ).!
Consequently two groups acting as above on the same length metric space are quasi-
isometric.
3. Givenafinitelygenerated groupGandafiniteindexsubgroupG init,GandG endowed1 1
with arbitrary word metrics are quasi-isometric.
In terms of Riemannian manifolds, if M is a finite covering of N then ! (M) and ! (N)1 1
are quasi-isometric.
4. Given a finite normal subgroup N in a finitely generated group G, G and G/N (both
endowed with arbitrary word metrics) are quasi-isometric.
Thus, in arguments where we study behaviour of groups with respect to quasi-isometry,
we can always replace a group with a finite index subgroup or with a quotient by a finite
normal subgroups.
5. All non-Abelian free groups of finite rank are quasi-isometric to each other. This follows
from the fact that the Cayley graph of the free group of rank n with respect to a set of n
generators and their inverses is the regular simplicial tree of valence 2n.
Now all regular simplicial trees of valence at least 3 are quasi-isometric. We denote byTk
the regular simplicial tree of valence k and we show that T is quasi-isometric to T for3 k
every k% 4.
We define the map q : T !T as in Figure 3, sending all edges drawn in thin lines3 k
isometrically onto edges and all paths of lengthk#3 drawn in thick lines onto one vertex.
The map q thus defined is surjective and it satisfies the inequality
1
dist(x,y)#1$ dist(q(x),q(y))$ dist(x,y).
k#2
6. Let M be a non-compact hyperbolic two-dimensional orbifold of finite area. This is the
2same thing as saying that M =!\H , where ! is a discrete subgroup of PSL (R) with2R
fundamental domain of finite area.
Nota bene: We assume that all the actions of groups by isometries on spaces are to the
left, as in the particular case when the space is the Cayley graph. This means that the
41
3 1 1
2
1 3
2 1
1 1
q
5
1
11
22
3131
TT3 6
Figure 3: All regular simplicial trees are quasi-isometric.
quotient will bealways taken to the left. We feel sorry for all people which are accustomed
to the quotients to the right.
We can apply the following result.
Lemma 1.2 (Selberg’s Lemma). A finitely generated group which is linear over a field
of characteristic zero has a torsion free subgroup of finite index.
We recall that torsion free group means a group which does not have finite non-trivial
subgroups. For an elementary proof of Selberg’s Lemma see [Al].
We conclude that ! has a finite index subgroup ! which is torsion free. It follows that1
2N=! \H is a hyperbolicsurface which is a finite covering ofM, hence it is of finite area1 R
but non-compact. On the other hand, it is known that the fundamental group of such a
surface is a free group of finite rank (see for instance [Mass]).
Conclusion: Thefundamentalgroupsofallhyperbolictwo-dimensionalorbifoldsarequasi-
isometric to each other.
Atthispointonemaystartthinkingthatthequasi-isometryistooweakarelationforgroups,
and that it does not distinguish too well between groups with di"erent algebraic structure. It
goes without saying that we are discussing here only infinite finitely generated groups, because
we need a word metric and because finite groups are all quasi-isometric to the trivial group.
We can start by asking if the result in Example 6 is true for any rank one symmetric space.
Question 1.3. Given M and N orbifolds of finite volume covered by the same rank one sym-
metric space, is it true that ! (M) and ! (N) are quasi-isometric ?1 1
It is true if N is obtained from M by means of a sequence of operations obviously leaving
the fundamental group! = ! (M) in the same quasi-isometry class :1
5• goingupordownafinitecovering,whichattheleveloffundamentalgroupsmeanschanging
! with a finite index subgroup or a finite extension;
• replacing a manifold with another one isometric to it, which at the level of groups means
gchanging! with a conjugate! , where g is an isometry of the universal covering.
Above we have used the following
gNotation: For A an element or a subgroup in a group G and g"G, we denote by A its image
!1gAg under conjugacy by g.
In the sequel we also use the following
Convention: In a group G we denote its neutral element by id if we consider an action of the
group on a space, and by 1 otherwise.
2 Rigidity of non-uniform rank one lattices
It turns out that the answer to the Question 1.3 is “very much negative”, so to speak, that
is: apart from the exceptional case of two dimensional hyperbolic orbifolds, in the other cases
finite volume rank one locally symmetric spaces which are not compact have quasi-isometric
fundamental groups if and only if the locally symmetric spaces are obtained one from the other
by means of a sequence of three of the operations described previously. More precisely, the
theorem below, formulated in terms of groups, holds.
2.1 Theorems of Richard Schwartz
We recall that a discrete group of isometries! of a symmetric spaceX such that!\X has finite
volume is called a lattice. If!\X is compact, the lattice is called uniform, otherwise it is called
non-uniform.
Theorem 2.1 (R. Schwartz, [Sch ]). (1) (quasi-isometric lattices)LetG beanon-uniform1 i
lattice of isometries of the rank one symmetric spaceX,i=1,2. Suppose thatG is quasi-i 1
isometric to G . Then X =X =X and one of the following holds:2 1 2
2(a) X =H ;R
g g(b) there exists an isometry g of X such that G *G has finite index both in G and in21 1
G .2
(2) (finitely generated groups quasi-isometric to lattices) Let # be a finitely generated group
2and let G be a non-uniform lattice of isometries of a rank one symmetric space X =H .R
If# is quasi-isometric to G then there exists a non-uniform lattice G of isometries of X1
and a finite group F such that one has the following exact sequence:
0!F !#!G ! 0.1
The notion of commensurability is recalled in Section 8. The particular case of commensu-
rability described in Theorem 2.1, (1), (b), means that the locally symmetric spacesG \X and1
G \X have isometric finite coverings.2
We note that Theorem 2.1 is in some sense a much stronger result than Mostow Theorem.
MostowTheoremrequirestheisomorphismoffundamentalgroups-whichisanalgebraicrelation
between groups, also implying their quasi-isometry. Theorem 2.1 only requires that the groups
6
+are quasi-isometric, which is a relation between “large scale geometries” of the two groups, and
has a priori nothing to do with the algebraic structure of the groups.
Since Mostow rigidity holds for all kinds of lattices, a first natural question to ask is:
Question 2.2. Are the two statements in Theorem 2.1 also true for uniform lattices ?
Concerningstatement(1),thefollowingcanbesaid: givenG uniformlatticesofisometriesofi
therankonesymmetricspacesX,i=1,2,G quasi-isometric toG impliesthatX =X =X.i 1 2 1 2
g2Now one can ask if in case X = H there exists an isometry g of X such that G *G21R
ghas finite index both in G and in G ? In other words is it true that all uniform lattices of21
2isometries of the same rank one symmetric space X =H are commensurable ?
R
A weaker variant of the previousquestion is whether allarithmetic uniformlattices of isome-
2tries of X =H are commensurable.
R
The answer to both questions is negative, as shown by the following counter-example.
Counter-example:
All the details for the statements below can be found in [GPS].,
2 2 2Let Q be a quadratic form of the type 2x #a x #···#a x , where a are positive1 n in+1 1 n
rational numbers. The set
n+1H ={(x ,...,x )"R |Q(x ,...,x ) =1,x > 0}Q 1 n+1 1 n+1 n+1
is a model of the hyperbolic n-dimensional space. Its group of isometries is SO (Q), theId
connected component containing the identity of the stabilizer of the form Q in SL(n+1,R).,
The discrete subgroup G =SO (Q)*SL(n+1,Z( 2)) is a uniform lattice. Now if two suchQ Id , ,
lattices G and G are commensurable then there exist g"GL(n+1,Q[ 2]) and ""Q[ 2]Q Q1 2
such that Q 'g = "Q . In particular, if n is odd then the ratio between the discriminant of1 2 ,
Q and the discriminant of Q is a square inQ[ 2]. It now su$ces to take two forms such that1 2
this is not possible, for instance (like in [GPS]):
, ,
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2Q = 2x #x #x #···#x and Q = 2x #3x #x #···#x .1 2n+1 1 2 n n+1 1 2 n
Statement (2) of Theorem 2.1, on the other hand, also holds for uniform lattices. See the
discussion in the beginning of Section 3.
A main step in the proof of Theorem 2.1 is the following rigidity result, interesting by itself.
Theorem2.3(RigidityTheorem[Sch ]). Let! andG be two non-uniform lattices of isome-1
n 2tries of H = H . An (L,C)–quasi-isometry q between ! and G is at finite distance from anF R
n g gisometry g of H with the property that ! *G has finite index in both ! and G.F
The meaning of the statement “q is at finite distance from g” is the following:
nFor every compact K in G\H there exists D =D(L,C,K,!,G) such that for every x with0F
Gx "K, one has0
dist(q(#)x , g#x )$D,-#"!.0 0
As it is, it does not look very enlightening. We shall come back to this statement in Section
2.3, after recalling what is the structure of finite volume real hyperbolic manifolds in Section
2.2. Also in Section 2.3 we shall give an outline of the proof of Theorem 2.3 in the particular
n 3case when H = H . All the ideas of the general proof are already present in this particularF R
case, and we avoid some technical di$culties that are irrelevant in a first approach.
According to Selberg’s Lemma, we may suppose, without loss of generality, that both! and
G are without torsion.
7
++++2.2 Finite volume real hyperbolic manifolds
Let M be a finite volume real hyperbolic manifold, that is a manifold with universal covering
nH , for some n% 2. Let! be its fundamental group.R
Given a point x"M denote by r(x) the injectivity radius of M at x.
For every$> 0 the manifold can be decomposed into two parts:
• the $-thick part: M ={x"M |r(x)% $};""
• the $-thin part: M ={x"M |r(x)<$}.<"
The following theorem describes the structure of M. We refer to [Th, §4.5] for details.
Theorem 2.4. (1) There exists a universal constant $ = $ (n) > 0 such that for every0 0
ncomplete manifold M of universal covering H and of fundamental group !, the $ -thin0R
part M is a disjoint union of<"0
– tubular neighbourhoods of short closed geodesics;
– neighbourhoods of cusps, that is sets of the form ! \Hbo(%), where Hbo(%) is an#
nopen horoball of basepoint %" & H and ! is the stabilizer of % in !.# #R
(2) A complete hyperbolic manifold M has finite volume if and only if for every$> 0 the
$-thick part M is compact.""
Note that the fact that M is compact implies that""0
– M has finitely many components;<"0
– for every neighbourhood of a cusp, ! \Hbo(%), its boundary ! \H(%), where H is# # #
the boundary horosphere of Hbo(%), is compact.
Let now M be a finite volume real hyperbolic manifold and! =! (M). Consider the finite1
set of tubular neighbourhoods of cusps
{! \Hbo(% )|i"{1,2,...,m}}.# ii
According to Theorem 2.4, the set
m"
M =M \ ! \Hbo(% )0 # ii
i=1
is compact. The pre-image of each cusp ! \Hbo(% ) is the !–orbit of Hbo(% ) and the open# i ii
horoballs composing this orbit are pairwise disjoint. Thus, the space
m" "
3X =H \ #Hbo(% )0 iR
i=1$$!/!!i
satisfies!\X =M .0 0
Remarks 2.5. The group! endowed with a word metric dist is quasi-isometric to the spacew
X with the length metric dist according to the example (2) of quasi-isometry given in Section0 !
1.2. In particular, since for every x " X,!x is a net in X , we also have that (!, dist ) is0 0 0 0 w
quasi-isometric to (!x , dist ).0 !
8!
Hb 3\ ! M = H" \Hb ! "!
\ X" 0
X
0
Figure 4: Finite volume hyperbolic manifold, space X .0
2.3 Proof of Theorem 2.3
3According to Section 2.2, there exists X complementary set inH of countably many pairwise0 R
disjoint open horoballs such that !\X is compact. Consequently, ! with any word metric is0
quasi-isometric toX withthelength metric. Similarly, onecan associate toGacomplementary0
set Y of countably many pairwise disjoint open horoballs such thatG\Y is compact and such0 0
that G with a word metric is quasi-isometric to Y with the length metric.0
Thequasi-isometry q:!!Ginducesaquasi-isometry between (!x ,dist )and(Gy ,dist ),0 0! !
for every x "X ,y "Y , hence also between X and Y (each quasi-isometry having di"erent0 0 0 0 0 0
parameters L and C). For simplicity, we denote all these quasi-isometries by q and all their
constants by L and C.
In theseterms, theconclusion of Theorem 2.3 means thatq seen as aquasi-isometry between
X and Y is at distance at mostD from the restriction toX of an isometryg in Comm(!,G),0 0 0
where D =D(L,C,X ,Y ).0 0
We now give an outline of proof of Theorem 2.3.
Step 1. The following general statement holds.
Lemma 2.6 (Quasi-Flat Lemma [Sch ], §3.2). Let! be a non-uniform lattice of isometries1
3of H . For every L% 1 and C % 0 there exists M = M(L,C) such that every quasi-isometric
R
embedding
2q :Z !!
has its range in N (#! ), where ! is a cusp group and #"!.M # #
We shall come back to the proof of Lemma 2.6 later (when discussing Theorem 5.8). For the
moment let us apply it to the (L,C)–quasi-isometry q from ! to G, and to its quasi-converse
¯q :G!!.
3 3• For every #"! and %" & H corresponding to a cusp of!\H ,# R R
q(#! ).N (gG ),# M %
3 3for some g"G and '" & H corresponding to a cusp of G\H ;# R R
93 3• For every g"G and '" & H corresponding to a cusp of G\H ,# R R
%¯q(gG ).N (#! !),% M #
% % 3 3for some # "! and % " & H corresponding to a cusp of!\H .# R R
Combining both and noticing that if the left class #! is contained in the tubular neigh-#
%bourhood of another left class #! ! then the two coincide, a bijection is obtained, between left#
classes #! and left classes gG , such that# %
%dist (q(#! ),gG )$M . (2)H # %
Here dist denotes the Hausdor" distance (see the Dictionary for a definition).H
The situation is represented in Figure 5.
q
XX 00
2Figure 5: Quasi-isometric embeddings ofZ .
Step 2. The map q seen as a quasi-isometry between !x , net in X and Gy , net in Y ,0 0 0 0
3 3is extended to a quasi-isometry q between a net N in H and a net N in H . This is donee 1 2R R
horoball byhoroball. Let#! andgG satisfying (2). Let#Hb andgHb bethecorresponding# % # %
horoballs. We divide each of them into strips of constant width, by means of countably many
horospheres. We note that #! x is (-separated, and that the horosphere #H is contained in# 0 #
N (#! x ), for some(> 0 and)> 0.& # 0
(1)% % %We project #! x onto the first horosphereH . We get a (( ,))–net, N , for some ( <(# 0 1 1
(1) (1) (1)%and ) <). We choose a maximal (-separated subset N in N , hence a ((,()–net in N1 1 1
(1)% !1and a ((,( +))–net in H . We extend q to N by q(n )=!'q'! (n ), where ! denotes1 1 11
the projection in each of the spaces onto the first horosphereH .1
WerepeattheargumentandextendqtoanetinH,H,etc. Aglobalquasi-isometryisthus2 3
%obtained. Indeed, given two points A"H and B"H , with m%n, if B is the projection ofn m
% %B onto H , the distance dist(A,B) is bi-Lipschitz equivalent to dist(A,B )+dist(B,B).n
3 3We finally obtain a quasi-isometry q between nets ofH , hence a quasi-isometry ofH .e R R
Nota bene: In the case of the Mostow rigidity theorem also a quasi-isometry of the whole
space is obtained, but it has the extra property that it is equivariant with respect to a given
isomorphism between the two groups ! and G. Here, the property of equivariance is replaced
10