These presentee pour obtenir le titre de Docteur de l'Universite Louis Pasteur

-

Documents
212 pages
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Niveau: Supérieur, Doctorat, Bac+8
These presentee pour obtenir le titre de Docteur de l'Universite Louis Pasteur Strasbourg I Discipline : Physique Structure et relaxation structurale des fondus de polymeres vitrifiables en couches minces Simone Peter These soutenue publiquement le 21 juin 2007 Membres du Jury : Directeur de these : J. Baschnagel Professeur ULP, ICS, Strasbourg Co-encadrant : H. Meyer Charge de recherche, ICS, Strasbourg Rapporteur interne : Y. Holl Professeur ULP, ICS, Strasbourg Rapporteur externe : M. Muller Professeur, Fachbereich Physik, Gottingen Rapporteur externe : W. Kob Professeur, UM2, LCVN, Montpellier Examinateur : G. Reiter Directeur de recherche, ICSI, Mulhouse Institut Charles Sadron Strasbourg CNRS

  • reiter directeur de recherche

  • professeur ulp

  • simulation model

  • relaxation structurale des fondus de polymeres vitrifiables

  • supported model polymer


Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Publié le 01 juin 2007
Nombre de visites sur la page 24
Langue English
Signaler un problème

These` present´ ee´ pour obtenir le titre de
Docteur de l’Universite´ Louis Pasteur
Strasbourg I
Discipline : Physique
Structure et relaxation structurale
`des fondus de polymeres vitrifiables
en couches minces
Simone Peter
These` soutenue publiquement le 21 juin 2007
Membres du Jury :
Directeur de these` : J. Baschnagel
Professeur ULP, ICS, Strasbourg
Co encadrant : H. Meyer
Charge´ de recherche, ICS, Strasbourg
Rapporteur interne : Y. Holl
Professeur ULP, ICS, Strasbourg
Rapporteur externe : M. Muller¨
Professeur, Fachbereich Physik, Gottingen¨
Rapporteur externe : W. Kob
Professeur, UM2, LCVN, Montpellier
Examinateur : G. Reiter
Directeur de recherche, ICSI, Mulhouse
Institut Charles Sadron
Strasbourg
CNRSAcknowledgements
The work on this thesis has been made possible by many other people who have sup
ported me. First of all I would like to express my gratitude to my supervisor Jor¨ g
Baschnagel who has helped me with his encouragement and many fruitful discus
sions. I owe a lot to my co advisor Hendrik Meyer who was always available to help
out solving physical as well as computational problems. I really appreciate that they
gave me the liberty to follow my own ideas. I also would like to thank all the members
of the RTN PolyFilm for the interesting discussions and incentives they have given
throughout the meetings and visits I could make in other groups. Last but not least I
would like to convey my gratefulness to my family and friends for the support they
provided me throughout my life.Contents
Resum´ e´ v
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Films de polymeres` libres et supportes´ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Solvant explicite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
1 Introduction 1
The glass transition in confinement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Non equilibrium nature of thin polymer films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Simulations of free standing and supported model polymer films . . . . . . 6 with explicit solvent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Outline of this theses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2 Model 9
2.1 Simulation model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2 Molecular dynamics simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2.1 Integration of the equations of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.2 Different ensembles: NVE, NVT, NPT . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.3 Simulation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.4 Double bridging algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3 Static structure 31
3.1 Glass transition temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.1.1 Definition of the film thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.1.2 Thickness dependence ofT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33g
3.1.3 Chain length ofT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35g
3.1.4 Cooling rate dependence ofT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36g
3.2 Static structure factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.2.1 Bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.2.2 Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.3 Radius of gyrationR and end to end distanceR . . . . . . . . . . . 44g e
3.4 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
iii
4 Dynamic properties 49
4.1 Average dynamic properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.1.1 Bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.1.2 Film versus bulk dynamics: qualitative features . . . . . . . . 51
4.2 Relaxation times andT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53c
4.2.1 Chain lengthN = 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.2.2 ChainN = 64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.2.3 Film versus bulk behavior: choosingT as a reference point . 55c
4.3 Layer resolved dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.3.1 Layer resolved analysis: definition and qualitative features . . 58
4.3.2 An attempt to quantify the penetration depth of the surface
effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.4 Thickness dependence ofT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64c
4.5 Position dependentT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66c
4.6 Non Gaussian parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.6.1 Bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.6.2 Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.7 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5 Capillary waves 79
5.1 Statics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.1.1 Surface tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.1.2 Capillary wave theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.1.3 Low q limit of the static structure factor . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5.2 Dynamic structure factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5.2.1 Bulk relaxation in the hydrodynamic limit . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5.2.2 Relaxation of surface height fluctuations . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.3 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6 Dielectric relaxation 95
6.1 Definition of the system’s polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.2 Auto correlation functions of the polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
6.2.1 Bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
6.2.2 Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3 Dielectric loss spectra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
6.3.1 Temperature dependence of the segmental mode relaxation . . 101
6.3.2 Normal mode relaxation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
6.4 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
7 Simulations with explicit solvent 109
7.1 Flory Huggins model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
7.2 Simulation model with explicit solvent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110Contents iii
7.2.1 Choice of the model parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
7.2.2 System preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
7.3 Dynamic properties of the binary mixture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
7.3.1 Mean square displacements of polymer and solvent . . . . . . 114
7.3.2 Layer resolved relaxation times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
7.3.3 Composition dependence of the relaxation times . . . . . . . 118
7.4 Static structure in the presence of the solvent . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
7.4.1 Static structure factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
7.4.2 Layer resolvedR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125g
7.5 Glass transition temperature of the binary mixture . . . . . . . . . . . 126
7.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
8 Solvent evaporation 131
8.1 Simulation results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
8.2 Theories of diffusion and solvent evaporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
8.2.1 Mutual versus self diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
8.2.2 Fickian versus non Fickian diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
8.2.3 Moving boundary problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
8.2.4 Analytical solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
8.3 Comparison of the simulation results with theory . . . . . . . . . . . 139
8.3.1 Solvent evaporation from supported films . . . . . . . . . . . 140
8.3.2 Finite size effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.3.3 Influence of temperature on the evaporation kinetics . . . . . 144
8.3.4 of film geometry on the ev . . . . 145
8.4 Numerical solution of the diffusion equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
8.4.1 Numerical implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
8.4.2 Solvent evaporation at high temperature (T = 0.5) . . . . . . 149
8.4.3 Solvent ev at the glass transition temperatureT . . . 151g
8.4.4 Possible interpretations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.5 Instantaneous extraction of the solvent belowT . . . . . . . . . . . . 156g
8.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
9 Conclusions 161
Relaxation and structure of polymer films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Simulations with explicit solvent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
A Tables 169
List of Figures 173
Bibliography 177ivResum´ e´
Introduction
Recemment,´ des experiences´ [1–11], des simulations numeriques´ [12–21] ainsi que
des approches theoriques´ [22–27] ont et´ e´ utilisees´ afin d’explorer le phenom´ ene` de la
transition vitreuse en milieu confine,´ de memeˆ que les mechanismes´ sous jacents. Ces
etudes´ mettent en evidence´ des deviations´ par rapport au comportement en volume si
le systeme` est confine´ a` l’echelle´ nanoscopique.
Un liquide de polymeres` formant un verre presente´ des propriet´ es´ que l’on re
trouve eg´ alement dans le cas d’autres liquides sujets a` une transition vitreuse; par
exemple, une forte augmentation (de type non Arrhenius) du temps de relaxation
structurale lors du refroidissement au voisinage de la temperature´ de transition vit
` ´ `reuseT [28, 29]. L’hypothese selon laquelle cette augmentation est liee a une crois g
sance de la longueur de correlation´ ξ existe de longue date. ξ est sense´ correspondreg g
a` la taille moyenne de la zone de rearrangement´ cooperatif´ (cooperatively rearrang
ing region, CRR), c’est a dire` d’un sous ensemble de particules susceptible de se
rearranger´ en une nouvelle configuration independament´ des autres particules dans
leur entourage [29]. Une approche tentante pour mettre en evidence´ l’existence de
telles CRR et estimer leur taille consiste en une etude´ de la transition vitreuse en mi
lieu confine.´ L’augmentation de ξ devrait alors etreˆ tronquee´ par la taille finie dug
systeme` confine,´ ce qui devrait conduire a` une diminution deT [29].g
De recents´ travaux experimemtaux´ et numeriques´ ont en effet rapporte´ des ecarts´
dans la valeur deT pour des liquides confines´ et des films de polymeres.` Cependant,g
ces deviations´ peuvent etreˆ aussi bien des augmentations que des diminutions par
rapport a` la valeur observee´ en volume (cf. [2, 30, 31] pour des revues et [24, 25, 27]
pour des approches theoriques´ recentes).´ Ceci implique qu’en plus des effets dusˆ
au confinement, d’autres facteurs jouent un roleˆ important. L’un des facteurs cle´
devrait etreˆ l’interaction du liquide avec le substrat le confinant [11]. Les simulations
suggerent` que cette interaction liquide substrat se decompose´ en deux contributions,
l’une ener´ getique´ et l’autre sterique.´ Par exemple, une forte attraction liquide substrat
peut pieger´ temporairement des particules proches des parois et contribuer a` ralentir
la dynamique par rapport a` celle observee´ en volume [16, 17]. Par ailleurs, memeˆ
en l’absence d’attraction pref´ erentielle,´ la dynamique peut se trouver ralentie si des
vvi Resum´ e´
particules sont emprisonnees´ dans des cavites´ du substrat [19, 32–34]. Dans les deux
cas, les particules lentes proches des parois ralentissent partiellement leur voisines qui
` ˆa leur tour genent le mouvement de leurs voisines, etc. Ceci permet au ralentissement
induit par les parois de se propager vers le centre du systeme.` Ceci resulte´ en une
augmentation de T , particulierement` dans le cas de confinements importants (poresg
tres` etroits,´ films ultra fins). A contrario, on peut s’attendre a` ce que des parois lisses
facilitent le mouvement des particules les plus proches, et ainsi conduisent a` une
diminution deT [35, 36].g
La plupart des etudes´ experimentales´ de la transition vitreuse en geom´ etrie´ con
´ ´ ´ ´finee ont porte sur la reponse moyenne du liquide confine. On trouve parmi les excep
tions notables les travaux recents´ de Nugent et al. [37] et ceux de Ellison et Torkel
son [9, 10]. Ellison et al. utilisent une technique de fluorescence sur multicouches
dans laquelle une couche mince fluorescente de polystyrene` (PS) est incorporee´ dans
un film de PS non marque.´ Ceci permet de mesurer T localement en differents´ en g
droits du film. Ils obtiennent une forte reduction´ deT a` l’interface libre des films deg
PS et une attenuation´ continue de l’effet quand la couche fluorescente est situee´ de
plus en plus profond dans le film. Il est possible de mesurer une diminution deT dansg
une couche marquee´ situee´ jusqu’a` 30 nm de la surface libre du film. Cette distance
` ´ ` ´excede largement la valeur de ξ estimee a 2 3 nm. Egalement, de recentes simula g
tions numeriques´ indiquent l’existence d’une dynamique het´ erog´ ene` [17, 35, 38] et
une distribution continue deT dans les couches minces de polymeres` [15, 21, 39].g
` ´Films de polymeres libres et supportes
Dans cette these,` nous apportons de nouvelles preuves de la diminution de T dansg
les couches minces de polymeres` avec une surface libre et des el´ ements´ en faveur
de l’existence d’une temperature´ de transition vitreuse locale. Nous avons utilise´ des
simulations de dynamique moleculaire´ de films libres et supportes´ pour des chaˆınes
non enchevetrˆ ees.´ Dans le cas du film supporte,´ le substrat est modelis´ e´ par un mur
´ ´ ´ ´ ´attractif lisse. Pour ces deux geometries differentes, nous avons etudie l’influence du
confinement sur les propriet´ es´ statiques et dynamiques du fondu.
Nous avons mis en evidence´ une structure en couche de la densite´ de monomeres`
a` l’interface supportee,´ tandis que le profil de densite´ au voisinage de la surface libre
decro´ ˆıt vers zero´ de fac ¸on monotone comme on peut l’observer sur la figure 1.
Cette structure en couches s’accentue lors d’un refroidissement et se propage
vers l’interieur´ du film. La dynamique dans nos systemes` est eg´ alement modifiee´
de par l’existence des interfaces. Une analyse resolue´ en couches demontre´ claire
ment que les monomeres` aux interfaces libre et solide sont plus rapides que ceux
situes´ au centre du film, qui conservent les propriet´ es´ observees´ en volume. De plus,
les monomeres` a` l’interface libre sont plus rapides que ceux proches du mur. Ces
monomeres` de surface tres` mobiles transmettent une partie de leur mobilite´ ele´ vee´ a`